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  1. Treatment Adherence Redefined: A Critical Analysis of Technotherapeutics.Marilou Gagnon, Jean Daniel Jacob & Adrian Guta - 2013 - Nursing Inquiry 20 (1):60-70.
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  • Biotechnology as End Game: Ontological and Ethical Collapse in the “Biotech Century”.Zipporah Weisberg - 2015 - NanoEthics 9 (1):39-54.
    I argue in this paper that animal biotechnology constitutes a dangerous ontological collapse between animals and the technical-economic apparatus. By ontological collapse, I mean the elimination of fundamental ontological tensions between embodied subjects and the principles of scientific, technological, and economic rationalization. Biotechnology imposes this collapse in various ways: by genetically “reprogramming” animals to serve as uniform commodities, by abstracting them into data and code, and, in some cases, by literally manipulating their movements with computer technologies. These and other forms (...)
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  • Reconstruction of the Ethical Debate on Naturalness in Discussions About Plant-Biotechnology.P. F. Van Haperen, B. Gremmen & J. Jacobs - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (6):797-812.
    Abstract This paper argues that in modern (agro)biotechnology, (un)naturalness as an argument contributed to a stalemate in public debate about innovative technologies. Naturalness in this is often placed opposite to human disruption. It also often serves as a label that shapes moral acceptance or rejection of agricultural innovative technologies. The cause of this lies in the use of nature as a closed, static reference to naturalness, while in fact “nature” is an open and dynamic concept with many different meanings. We (...)
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  • Can the Treatment of Animals Be Compared to the Holocaust?David Sztybel - 2006 - Ethics and the Environment 11 (1):97-132.
    : The treatment of animals and the Holocaust have been compared many times before, but never has a thoroughly detailed comparison been offered. A thirty-nine-point comparison can be constructed, whether or not one believes that animals are oppressed. The question of whether or not the comparison ought to be expressed merely brings into question whether animal liberationists have liberal-democratic rights to express themselves, which they surely do. Four objections are considered: Is the comparison offensive? Does the comparison trivialize what happened (...)
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  • Understanding Human Technogenesis: Human Development in the Post-Genomic World.Dinesh Sharma - 2008 - Genomics, Society and Policy 4 (3):89-102.
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  • Resolving Multiple Visions of Nature, Science, and Religion.James D. Proctor - 2004 - Zygon 39 (3):637-657.
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  • Dissolving the Engineering Moral Dilemmas Within the Islamic Ethico-Legal Praxes.Abdul Kabir Hussain Solihu & Abdul Rauf Ambali - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (1):133-147.
    The goal of responsible engineers is the creation of useful and safe technological products and commitment to public health, while respecting the autonomy of the clients and the public. Because engineers often face moral dilemma to resolve such issues, different engineers have chosen different course of actions depending on their respective moral value orientations. Islam provides a value-based mechanism rooted in the Maqasid al-Shari‘ah (the objectives of Islamic law). This mechanism prioritizes some values over others and could help resolve the (...)
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  • Psychopharmacology and the Self: An Introduction to the Theme. [REVIEW]Fredrik Svenaeus - 2007 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (2):115-117.
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  • Reconstruction of the Ethical Debate on Naturalness in Discussions About Plant-Biotechnology.P. F. Haperen, B. Gremmen & J. Jacobs - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (6):797-812.
    This paper argues that in modern (agro)biotechnology, (un)naturalness as an argument contributed to a stalemate in public debate about innovative technologies. Naturalness in this is often placed opposite to human disruption. It also often serves as a label that shapes moral acceptance or rejection of agricultural innovative technologies. The cause of this lies in the use of nature as a closed, static reference to naturalness, while in fact “nature” is an open and dynamic concept with many different meanings. We propose (...)
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  • Shopping for Change? Neoliberalizing Activism and the Limits to Eating Non-GMO.Robin Jane Roff - 2007 - Agriculture and Human Values 24 (4):511-522.
    While the cultivation of genetically modified organisms (GMO) and the spread of genetically engineered (GE) foods has gone largely unnoticed by the majority of Americans, a growing number of vocal civil society groups are opposing the technology and with it the entire conventional system of food provision. As with other alternative food movements, non-GMO activists focus on changing individual consumption habits as the best means of altering the practices of food manufacturers and thereby what and how food is produced. In (...)
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  • Access to Life-Saving Medicines and Intellectual Property Rights: An Ethical Assessment.Doris Schroeder & Peter Singer - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (2):279-289.
    Dying before one’s time has been a prominent theme in classic literature and poetry. Catherine Linton’s youthful death in Wuthering Heights leaves behind a bereft Heathcliff and generations of mourning readers. The author herself, Emily Brontë, died young from tuberculosis. John Keats’ Ode on Melancholy captures the transitory beauty of 19th century human lives too often ravished by early death. Keats also died of tuberculosis, aged 25. “The bloom, whose petals nipped before they blew, died on the promise of the (...)
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  • Can the Treatment of Animals Be Compared to the Holocaust?David Sztybel - 2006 - Ethics and the Environment 11 (1):97-132.
    The treatment of animals and the Holocaust have been compared many times before, but never has a thoroughly detailed comparison been offered. A thirty-nine-point comparison can be constructed, whether or not one believes that animals are oppressed. The question of whether or not the comparison ought to be expressed merely brings into question whether animal liberationists have liberal-democratic rights to express themselves, which they surely do. Four objections are considered: Is the comparison offensive? Does the comparison trivialize what happened to (...)
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  • Genetic Science, Animal Exploitation, and the Challenge for Democracy.Steven Best - 2006 - AI and Society 20 (1):6-21.
    As the debates over cloning and stem cell research indicate, issues raised by biotechnology combine research into the genetic sciences, perspectives and contexts articulated by the social sciences, and the ethical and anthropological concerns of philosophy. Consequently, I argue that intervening in the debates over biotechnology requires supra-disciplinary critical philosophy and social theory to illuminate the problems and their stakes. In addition, debates over cloning and stem cell research raise exceptionally important challenges to bioethics and a democratic politics of communication.
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