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Can't We Make Moral Judgements?

St. Martin's Press (1991)

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  1. Withdrawing Critical Care From Patients in a Triage Situation.Joseph Tham, Louis Melahn & Michael Baggot - 2021 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 24 (2):205-211.
    The advent of COVID-19 has been the occasion for a renewed interest in the principles governing triage when the number of critically ill patients exceeds the healthcare infrastructure’s capacity in a given location. Some scholars advocate that it would be morally acceptable in a crisis to withdraw resources like life support and ICU beds from one patient in favor of another, if, in the judgment of medical personnel, the other patient has a significantly better prognosis. The paper examines the arguments (...)
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  • Guinea Pig Duties: 1. The Need for Clinical Research.T. J. Steiner - 2005 - Research Ethics 1 (1):13-22.
    If patients are to be partners rather than subjects, contributing effectively to clinical research in which they have an interest, both they and investigators must change their ways. The case is argued here that the conduct of clinical research fulfils an essential need of society and that, therefore, in the interests of society, there is a moral imperative that it be done. Further essays will develop this theme, questioning along the way whether consent is a redundant concept.
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  • Guinea Pig Duties: 4. The Extent and Limits of Patients' Duties in Clinical Research.T. J. Steiner - 2005 - Research Ethics 1 (4):115-121.
    In a series of articles, I set out my belief that investigators and subjects of research should work together in a partnership based in shared aims. Such a relationship – quite different from what is usual today – would impose duties on both partners. In earlier papers I explored the origin and nature of the duties that would fall on patients; here I examine their limits.
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  • Guinea Pig Duties: 2. The Origin of Patients' Duties in Clinical Research.T. J. Steiner - 2005 - Research Ethics 1 (2):45-52.
    This series of articles argues for a different relationship between investigators and subjects of clinical research based on partnership in shared aims and recognition, by each, of their duties within this partnership. This second essay describes how those duties arise and explores the basis on which, and by and to whom, they are owed. The conclusion that patients have duties in research raises a number of moral issues which, ultimately, question the concept of consent. Discussion of these will be continued (...)
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  • Child‐Rearing: On Government Intervention and the Discourse of Experts.Paul Smeyers - 2008 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (6):719-738.
    For Kant, education was understood as the ‘means’ to become human—and that is to say, rational. For Rousseau by contrast, and the many child‐centred educators that followed him, the adult world, far from representing reason, is essentially corrupt and given over to the superficialities of worldly vanity. On this view, the child, as a product of nature, is essentially good and will learn all she needs to know from experience. Both positions have their own problems, but beyond this ‘internal debate’, (...)
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  • Confucianism, Globalisation and the Idea of Universalism.A. T. Nuyen - 2003 - Asian Philosophy 13 (2 & 3):75 – 86.
    The pace of globalisation has quickened considerably in the last ten to fifteen years. The process has yielded benefits but also resulted in conflicts. The benefits would be enhanced if the conflicts could be resolved. One source of conflicts is the desire to maintain cultural identity. Can Confucianism contribute to the working out of a universal global justice that can help resolve conflicts, particularly conflicts of cultural identities? Can it be part of the globalisation process without sacrificing its cultural identity? (...)
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  • Discourse and Wolves: Science, Society, and Ethics.William S. Lynn - 2010 - Society and Animals 18 (1):75-92.
    Wolves have a special resonance in many human cultures. To appreciate fully the wide variety of views on wolves, we must attend to the scientific, social, and ethical discourses that frame our understanding of wolves themselves, as well as their relationships with people and the natural world. These discourses are a configuration of ideas, language, actions, and institutions that enable or constrain our individual and collective agency with respect to wolves. Scientific discourse is frequently privileged when it comes to wolves, (...)
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  • Liberalism for the Liberals, Cannibalism for the Cannibals.Steven Lukes - 2001 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 4 (4):35-54.
  • Dismissing the Moral Sceptic: A Wittgensteinian Approach.Sasha Lawson-Frost - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (3):1235-1251.
    Cartesian scepticism poses the question of how we can justify our belief that other humans experience consciousness in the same way that we do. Wittgenstein’s response to this scepticism is one that does not seek to resolve the problem by providing a sound argument against the Cartesian sceptic. Rather, he provides a method of philosophical inquiry which enables us to move past this and continue our inquiry without the possibility of solipsism arising as a philosophical problem in the first place. (...)
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  • Bioethics, Cultural Differences and the Problem of Moral Disagreements in End-Of-Life Care: A Terror Management Theory.M. -J. Johnstone - 2012 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (2):181-200.
    Next SectionCultural differences in end-of-life care and the moral disagreements these sometimes give rise to have been well documented. Even so, cultural considerations relevant to end-of-life care remain poorly understood, poorly guided, and poorly resourced in health care domains. Although there has been a strong emphasis in recent years on making policy commitments to patient-centred care and respecting patient choices, persons whose minority cultural worldviews do not fit with the worldviews supported by the conventional principles of western bioethics face a (...)
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  • Language as a Values‐Realizing Activity: Caring, Acting, and Perceiving.Bert H. Hodges - 2015 - Zygon 50 (3):711-735.
    A problem for natural scientific accounts, psychology in particular, is the existence of value. An ecological account of values is reviewed and illustrated in three domains of research: carrying differing loads; negotiating social dilemmas involving agreement and disagreement; and timing the exposure of various visual presentations. Then it is applied in greater depth to the nature of language. As described and illustrated, values are ontological relationships that are neither subjective nor objective, but which constrain and obligate all significant animate activity (...)
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  • School Discipline, Buy-in and Belief.Joan F. Goodman - 2007 - Ethics and Education 2 (1):3-23.
    It is generally acknowledged that school discipline is failing. Through a comparison of two very different disciplinary situations, I inquire into possible causes of failure and conditions of success. The argument is made that if discipline is to succeed, students must believe in and identify with the goals it is designed to support. Questions are raised as to just how embracing (pervasive throughout school life), lofty (transcending the classroom), and moralized (emphasizing social over personal) such goals should be. Without specifying (...)
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  • Sporty Solidarity, and the Expanding Circle.Simon Eassom - 1997 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 24 (1):79-98.
  • Abortion and the Neutrality of the Liberal State.Alan P. Dobson - 2006 - Politics and Ethics Review 2 (2):178-201.
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  • Metaethics.Geoff Sayre-McCord - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.