Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Thomas Reid and the Problem of Induction: From Common Experience to Common Sense.Benjamin W. Redekop - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (1):35-57.
    By the middle of the eighteenth century the new science had challenged the intellectual primacy of common experience in favor of recondite, expert and even counter-intuitive knowledge increasingly mediated by specialized instruments. Meanwhile modern philosophy had also problematized the perceptions of common experience — in the case of David Hume this included our perception of causal relations in nature, a fundamental precondition of scientific endeavor.In this article I argue that, in responding to the ‘problem of induction’ as advanced by Hume, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • La Fundamentación Filosófica de Los Principios No-Empíricos de Investigación.Sergio H. Menna - 2004 - Principia: An International Journal of Epistemology 8 (1):55-83.
    Non-empirical principles have always been a subject of interest of philoso-phers. Authors from different times and traditions agree that principles such as analogy or simplicity are present in the scientific practice. The disagreement comes out when these authors affirm that these principles have an epistemic function, and when they try to present reasons in order to found this state-ment. The first goal of this paper is to describe these principles and to point out their methodological importance. The second goal is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • True Science: Apropos a Recent Collection of Duhem's Essays.Paul Needham - 2000 - Theoria 66 (1):86-96.
    Duhem is perhaps the last active scientist to have produced a philosophi- cal text, and TheAim and Structure of Physical Theory retains its status as one that every textbook writer in the philosophy of science has to take into consideration. Several of Duhem’s other books have since appeared in English translation, but the Essays in the History and Philosophy of Science is the first collection of Duhem’s papers to appear in English. Commentators have oRen pointed out that the roots of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Survey of Inductive Generalization.John D. Norton - unknown
    Inductive generalization asserts that what obtains in known instances can be generalized to all. Its original form is enumerative induction, the earliest form of inductive inference, and it has been elaborated in various ways, largely with the goal of extending its reach. Its principal problem is that it supplies no intrinsic notion of strength of support so that one cannot tell if the generalization has weak or strong support.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Newton's Regulae Philosophandi.Zvi Biener - 2018 - In Chris Smeenk & Eric Schliesser (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Isaac Newton. Oxford University Press.
    Newton’s Regulae philosophandi—the rules for reasoning in natural philosophy—are maxims of causal reasoning and induction. This essay reviews their significance for Newton’s method of inquiry, as well as their application to particular propositions within the Principia. Two main claims emerge. First, the rules are not only interrelated, they defend various facets of the same core idea: that nature is simple and orderly by divine decree, and that, consequently, human beings can be justified in inferring universal causes from limited phenomena, if (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Scepticisme, Fidéisme Et Évidentialisme : Oppositions Et Origines.Artūrs Logins - 2013 - Dialogue 51 (4):613-642.
    Les principales attitudes adoptées devant les questions centrales de l’épistémologie générale sont selon nous l’évidentialisme, le scepticisme et le fidéisme. Dans cet article, nous présentons d’une part les arguments permettant d’accepter une forme de l’évidentialisme selon laquelle aucune croyance fausse ne peut être justifiée sur la base de raisons probantes. D’autre part, nous proposons de considérer l’aspect historique de l’émergence de l’évidentialisme au début des Lumières. Nous explorons un cas particulier qui témoigne de l’émergence de l’évidentialisme moderne comme opposition au (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Experimenters' Regress: From Skepticism to Argumentation.Benoı̂t Godin & Yves Gingras - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (1):133-148.
    Harry Collins' central argument about experimental practice revolves around the thesis that facts can only be generated by good instruments but good instruments can only be recognized as such if they produce facts. This is what Collins calls the experimenters' regress. For Collins, scientific controversies cannot be closed by the ‘facts’ themselves because there are no formal criteria independent of the outcome of the experiment that scientists can apply to decide whether an experimental apparatus works properly or not.No one seems (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Hume on Probability.Barry Gower - 1991 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 42 (1):1-19.
  • Regula Socratis: The Rediscovery of Ancient Induction in Early Modern England.John P. McCaskey - 2006 - Dissertation, Stanford University
    A revisionist account of how philosophical induction was conceived in the ancient world and how that conception was transmitted, altered, and then rediscovered. I show how philosophers of late antiquity and then the medieval period came step-by-step to seriously misunderstand Aristotle’s view of induction and how that mistake was reversed by humanists in the Renaissance and then especially by Francis Bacon. I show, naturally enough then, that in early modern science, Baconians were Aristotelians and Aristotelians were Baconians.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Hume Literature, 1986-1993.William E. Morris - 1994 - Hume Studies 20 (2):299-326.