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  1. Negotiated Measures: The Institutional Micropolitics of Official Criminal Justice Statistics.Kevin D. Haggerty - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 32 (4):705-722.
    This paper examines some of the background social and institutional practices involved in the production of official statistics about crime and criminal justice. It documents how a host of micropolitical considerations impinge on what studies are conducted, which agencies control official data, and how measures are standardized. The communication of statistical facts is also shown to be influenced by a concern to prospectively manage the political symbolism of popular accounts about crime and criminal justice statistics.
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  • Critique as Locus or Modus? Power and Resistance in the World of Work.Torben Bech Dyrberg & Peter Triantafillou - 2019 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 20 (1):47-70.
    How and from where can power be criticized and resisted? The advent of new managerial forms of power has brought the question once more to the fore. One of the salient issues is whether the ubiquity and apparent omnipotence of contemporary forms of managerial power renders critique and resistance difficult. This article compares the critical potential of French pragmatic sociology and Foucauldian-inspired genealogy. We argue that both approaches offer viable critiques of contemporary forms of power. Yet, whereas the critique of (...)
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  • Knowledge Claims and the Governance of Agri-Food Innovation.Richard Philip Lee - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (1):79-91.
    In this paper I examine how knowledge claims operating through two types of governance techniques can guide product innovations in the agri-food sector. The notion that knowledge claims have strong social and material components informs the analysis undertaken, developed through a discussion of social science approaches to the role of human groups and biophysical properties in social change. I apply this socio-technical perspective to two case studies: defining dietary fiber and reducing saturated fat. The first involves attempts to produce an (...)
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  • Laboratizing and de-Laboratizing the World.Michael Guggenheim - 2012 - History of the Human Sciences 25 (1):99-118.
    How has sociology framed places of knowledge production and what is the specific power of the laboratory for this history? This article looks in three steps at how sociology and Science and Technology Studies (STS) have historically framed the world as laboratory. First, in early sociology, the laboratory was an important metaphor to conceive of sociology as a scientific enterprise. In the 1950s, the trend reversed and with the emergence of a ‘qualitative sociology’, sociology was seen in opposition to laboratory (...)
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  • Society as Experiment: Sociological Foundations for a Self-Experimental Society.Matthias Gross & Wolfgang Krohn - 2005 - History of the Human Sciences 18 (2):63-86.
    Experiments are generally thought of as actions or operations undertaken to test a scientific hypothesis in settings detached from the rest of society. In this paper a different notion of experiment will be discussed. It is an understanding that has been developed in the classical tradition of the Chicago School of Sociology since the 1890s, but has so far remained unexplored. This sociological understanding of experiment does not model itself strictly on the natural sciences. Rather, it implies a process of (...)
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  • Wisdom in Organizations: Whence and Whither.David Rooney & Bernard McKenna - 2007 - Social Epistemology 21 (2):113 – 138.
    We trace the genealogy of wisdom to show that its status in epistemological and management discourse has gradually declined since the Scientific Revolution. As the status of wisdom has declined, so the status of rational science has grown. We argue that the effects on the practice of management of the decline of wisdom may impede management practice by clouding judgment, degrading decision making and compromising ethical standards. We show that wisdom combines transcendent intellection and rational process with ethics to provide (...)
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  • Putting the Technological Into Government.Mitchell Dean - 1996 - History of the Human Sciences 9 (3):47-68.