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  1. How Diagrams Can Support Syllogistic Reasoning: An Experimental Study.Yuri Sato & Koji Mineshima - 2015 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 24 (4):409-455.
    This paper explores the question of what makes diagrammatic representations effective for human logical reasoning, focusing on how Euler diagrams support syllogistic reasoning. It is widely held that diagrammatic representations aid intuitive understanding of logical reasoning. In the psychological literature, however, it is still controversial whether and how Euler diagrams can aid untrained people to successfully conduct logical reasoning such as set-theoretic and syllogistic reasoning. To challenge the negative view, we build on the findings of modern diagrammatic logic and introduce (...)
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  • Proof Theory for Heterogeneous Logic Combining Formulas and Diagrams: Proof Normalization.Ryo Takemura - forthcoming - Archive for Mathematical Logic:1-31.
    We extend natural deduction for first-order logic by introducing diagrams as components of formal proofs. From the viewpoint of FOL, we regard a diagram as a deductively closed conjunction of certain FOL formulas. On the basis of this observation, we first investigate basic heterogeneous logic wherein heterogeneous inference rules are defined in the styles of conjunction introduction and elimination rules of FOL. By examining what is a detour in our heterogeneous proofs, we discuss that an elimination-introduction pair of rules constitutes (...)
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  • Counter-Example Construction with Euler Diagrams.Ryo Takemura - 2015 - Studia Logica 103 (4):669-696.
    One of the traditional applications of Euler diagrams is as a representation or counterpart of the usual set-theoretical models of given sentences. However, Euler diagrams have recently been investigated as the counterparts of logical formulas, which constitute formal proofs. Euler diagrams are rigorously defined as syntactic objects, and their inference systems, which are equivalent to some symbolic logical systems, are formalized. Based on this observation, we investigate both counter-model construction and proof-construction in the framework of Euler diagrams. We introduce the (...)
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  • Syllogisms in Rudimentary Linear Logic, Diagrammatically.Ruggero Pagnan - 2013 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 22 (1):71-113.
    We present a reading of the traditional syllogistics in a fragment of the propositional intuitionistic multiplicative linear logic and prove that with respect to a diagrammatic logical calculus that we introduced in a previous paper, a syllogism is provable in such a fragment if and only if it is diagrammatically provable. We extend this result to syllogistics with complemented terms à la De Morgan, with respect to a suitable extension of the diagrammatic reasoning system for the traditional case and a (...)
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  • Presence and Absence of Individuals in Diagrammatic Logics: An Empirical Comparison.Gem Stapleton, Andrew Blake, Jim Burton & Anestis Touloumis - 2017 - Studia Logica 105 (4):787-815.
    The development of diagrammatic logics is strongly motivated by the desire to make formal reasoning accessible to broad audiences. One major research problem, for which surprisingly little progress has been made, is to understand how to choose between semantically equivalent diagrams from the perspective of human cognition. The particular focus of this paper is on choosing between diagrams that represent either the presence or absence of individuals. To understand how to best make this choice, we conducted an empirical study. We (...)
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