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  1. Deliberating Animal Values: A Pragmatic—Pluralistic Approach to Animal Ethics. [REVIEW]Frank Kupper & Tjard Cock Bunindeg - 2011 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (5):431-450.
    Debates in animal ethics are largely characterized by ethical monism, the search for a single, timeless, and essential trait in which the moral standing of animals can be grounded. In this paper, we argue that a monistic approach towards animal ethics hampers and oversimplifies the moral debate. The value pluralism present in our contemporary societies requires a more open and flexible approach to moral inquiry. This paper advocates the turn to a pragmatic, pluralistic approach to animal ethics. It contributes to (...)
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  • A “Practical” Ethic for Animals.David Fraser - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (5):721-746.
    Abstract Drawing on the features of “practical philosophy” described by Toulmin ( 1990 ), a “practical” ethic for animals would be rooted in knowledge of how people affect animals, and would provide guidance on the diverse ethical concerns that arise. Human activities affect animals in four broad ways: (1) keeping animals, for example, on farms and as companions, (2) causing intentional harm to animals, for example through slaughter and hunting, (3) causing direct but unintended harm to animals, for example by (...)
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  • The Natural Environment as a Salient Stakeholder: Non-Anthropocentrism, Ecosystem Stability and the Financial Markets.Simon D. Norton - 2007 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 16 (4):387–402.
    The current debate as to whether the natural environment should be accorded stakeholder status involves an assumption that it is in some way ‘different’ from other stakeholders, requiring favourable discriminatory treatment. Essentially it is regarded as passive, requiring regulatory agencies to represent its interests or the wider public to demand its protection on the occasion of, for example, oil spills that leave wildlife in a visibly distressed state. But the natural environment does not have ‘consciousness’ as do traditional classes of (...)
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  • The Natural Environment as a Salient Stakeholder: Non-Anthropocentrism, Ecosystem Stability and the Financial Markets.Simon D. Norton - 2007 - Business Ethics: A European Review 16 (4):387-402.
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  • Environmental Pragmatism, Global Warming, and Climate Change.Jacoby Adeshei Carter - 2012 - Contemporary Pragmatism 9 (1):133-150.
    This paper begins with a presentation of some important aspects of the science behind global warming. Following that, I argue that attempts to address global warming and climate change as problems facing humanity ought not to center around economic understandings of the problem or it solutions. Moreover, I argue that pragmatism is especially vulnerable to this sort of misappropriation in seeking solutions to climate change, and that environmental pragmatists ought to make a conscious effort to avoid potential mischaracterizations of pragmatism (...)
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  • Deliberating Animal Values: A Pragmatic—Pluralistic Approach to Animal Ethics.Frank Kupper & Tjard De Cock Buning - 2011 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (5):431-450.
    Debates in animal ethics are largely characterized by ethical monism, the search for a single, timeless, and essential trait in which the moral standing of animals can be grounded. In this paper, we argue that a monistic approach towards animal ethics hampers and oversimplifies the moral debate. The value pluralism present in our contemporary societies requires a more open and flexible approach to moral inquiry. This paper advocates the turn to a pragmatic, pluralistic approach to animal ethics. It contributes to (...)
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  • Sustainable Food Consumption: Exploring the Consumer “Attitude – Behavioral Intention” Gap. [REVIEW]Iris Vermeir & Wim Verbeke - 2005 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (2):169-194.
    Although public interest in sustainability increases and consumer attitudes are mainly positive, behavioral patterns are not univocally consistent with attitudes. This study investigates the presumed gap between favorable attitude towards sustainable behavior and behavioral intention to purchase sustainable food products. The impact of involvement, perceived availability, certainty, perceived consumer effectiveness (PCE), values, and social norms on consumers’ attitudes and intentions towards sustainable food products is analyzed. The empirical research builds on a survey with a sample of 456 young consumers, using (...)
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  • The Once and Future Georgic: Agricultural Practice, Environmental Knowledge, and the Place for an Ethic of Experience. [REVIEW]Benjamin R. Cohen - 2009 - Agriculture and Human Values 26 (3):153-165.
    This paper re-introduces the georgic ethic and the role it has historically played in debates about new agricultural practices. Public engagement, participatory research, and greater local involvement in crafting new means to work the land flood the literature of agrarian studies. Putting the experience- and place-based georgic into that discourse can help deepen its character and future possibilities. The paper draws from recent sociological research into the acceptance and resistance to new practices to show the georgic’s explanatory, descriptive utility in (...)
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  • Environmental Pragmatism, Adaptive Management, and Cultural Reform. Jenkins - 2011 - Ethics and the Environment 16 (1):51-74.
    The field of environmental ethics hosts a debate between competing strategies of practical reason. Both sides of the debate share a commitment for ethics to address environmental problems, but strategies diverge over notions of what an ethic must accomplish in order to do so effectively. Should ethics critique the cultural worldviews that give rise to environmental problems and propose alternative environmental values, or should it develop practical responses to problems from broadly available cultural values? That initial question of strategy seems (...)
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