Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Embodied attention and word learning by toddlers.Chen Yu & Linda B. Smith - 2012 - Cognition 125 (2):244-262.
  • Perceiving referential intent: Dynamics of reference in natural parent–child interactions.John C. Trueswell, Yi Lin, Benjamin Armstrong, Erica A. Cartmill, Susan Goldin-Meadow & Lila R. Gleitman - 2016 - Cognition 148 (C):117-135.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Knowing what a novel word is not: Two-year-olds ‘listen through’ ambiguous adjectives in fluent speech.Kirsten Thorpe & Anne Fernald - 2006 - Cognition 100 (3):389-433.
  • “Frequent Frames” in German Child-Directed Speech: A Limited Cue to Grammatical Categories.Barbara Stumper, Colin Bannard, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (6):1190-1205.
    Mintz (2003) found that in English child-directed speech, frequently occurring frames formed by linking the preceding (A) and succeeding (B) word (A_x_B) could accurately predict the syntactic category of the intervening word (x). This has been successfully extended to French (Chemla, Mintz, Bernal, & Christophe, 2009). In this paper, we show that, as for Dutch (Erkelens, 2009), frequent frames in German do not enable such accurate lexical categorization. This can be explained by the characteristics of German including a less restricted (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • A Probabilistic Constraints Approach to Language Acquisition and Processing.Mark S. Seidenberg & Maryellen C. MacDonald - 1999 - Cognitive Science 23 (4):569-588.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  • Grammatical pattern learning by human infants and cotton-top tamarin monkeys.Jenny Saffran, Marc Hauser, Rebecca Seibel, Joshua Kapfhamer, Fritz Tsao & Fiery Cushman - 2008 - Cognition 107 (2):479-500.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Explaining errors in children’s questions.Caroline F. Rowland - 2007 - Cognition 104 (1):106-134.
    The ability to explain the occurrence of errors in children's speech is an essential component of successful theories of language acquisition. The present study tested some generativist and constructivist predictions about error on the questions produced by ten English-learning children between 2 and 5 years of age. The analyses demonstrated that, as predicted by some generativist theories [e.g. Santelmann, L., Berk, S., Austin, J., Somashekar, S. & Lust. B. (2002). Continuity and development in the acquisition of inversion in yes/no questions: (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Uncovering the Richness of the Stimulus: Structure Dependence and Indirect Statistical Evidence.Florencia Reali & Morten H. Christiansen - 2005 - Cognitive Science 29 (6):1007-1028.
    The poverty of stimulus argument is one of the most controversial arguments in the study of language acquisition. Here we follow previous approaches challenging the assumption of impoverished primary linguistic data, focusing on the specific problem of auxiliary (AUX) fronting in complex polar interrogatives. We develop a series of corpus analyses of child-directed speech showing that there is indirect statistical information useful for correct auxiliary fronting in polar interrogatives and that such information is sufficient for distinguishing between grammatical and ungrammatical (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  • The learnability of abstract syntactic principles.Amy Perfors, Joshua B. Tenenbaum & Terry Regier - 2011 - Cognition 118 (3):306-338.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   49 citations  
  • Lexical Categories at the Edge of the Word.Luca Onnis & Morten H. Christiansen - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (1):184-221.
    Language acquisition may be one of the most difficult tasks that children face during development. They have to segment words from fluent speech, figure out the meanings of these words, and discover the syntactic constraints for joining them together into meaningful sentences. Over the past couple of decades, computational modeling has emerged as a new paradigm for gaining insights into the mechanisms by which children may accomplish these feats. Unfortunately, many of these models assume a computational complexity and linguistic knowledge (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • A universal cue for grammatical categories in the input to children: Frequent frames.Steven Moran, Damián E. Blasi, Robert Schikowski, Aylin C. Küntay, Barbara Pfeiler, Shanley Allen & Sabine Stoll - 2018 - Cognition 175 (C):131-140.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The differential role of phonological and distributional cues in grammatical categorisation.Padraic Monaghan, Nick Chater & Morten H. Christiansen - 2005 - Cognition 96 (2):143-182.
  • Integrating constraints for learning word–referent mappings.Padraic Monaghan & Karen Mattock - 2012 - Cognition 123 (1):133-143.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Frequent frames as a cue for grammatical categories in child directed speech.Toben H. Mintz - 2003 - Cognition 90 (1):91-117.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   48 citations  
  • Grammatical pattern learning by human infants and cotton-top tamarin monkeys.Fiery Cushman Jenny Saffran, Marc Hauser, Rebecca Seibel, Joshua Kapfhamer, Fritz Tsao - 2008 - Cognition 107 (2):479.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Word frequency, function words and the second gavagai problem.Jean-Rémy Hochmann - 2013 - Cognition 128 (1):13-25.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Comment: Acquiring metaphors.Joshua K. Hartshorne - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (3):280-282.
    Lakoff describes an account of conceptual representation based in part on metaphor. Though promising, this account faces several challenges with respect to learning and development.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • More misunderstandings of collostructional analysis: On Schmid and Küchenhoff.Stefan Th Gries - 2015 - Cognitive Linguistics 26 (3):505-536.
    Journal Name: Cognitive Linguistics Issue: Ahead of print.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Subtle Implicit Language Facts Emerge from the Functions of Constructions.Adele E. Goldberg - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Explanation and Constructions: Response to Adger.Adele E. Goldberg - 2013 - Mind and Language 28 (4):479-491.
  • Experience with morphosyntactic paradigms allows toddlers to tacitly anticipate overregularized verb forms months before they produce them.Megan Figueroa & LouAnn Gerken - 2019 - Cognition 191 (C):103977.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Rapid learning of syllable classes from a perceptually continuous speech stream.Ansgar D. Endress & Luca L. Bonatti - 2007 - Cognition 105 (2):247-299.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  • An alternative view of the mental lexicon.Jeffrey Elman L. - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (7):301-306.
    An essential aspect of knowing language is knowing the words of that language. This knowledge is usually thought to reside in the mental lexicon, a kind of dictionary that contains information regarding a word’s meaning, pronunciation, syntactic characteristics, and so on. In this article, a very different view is presented. In this view, words are understood as stimuli that operate directly on mental states. The phonological, syntactic and semantic properties of a word are revealed by the effects it has on (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  • Explanation and Constructions: Response to Adger.Adele E. Goldberg - 2013 - Mind and Language 28 (4):479-491.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Studying the Real-Time Interpretation of Novel Noun and Verb Meanings in Young Children.Alex de Carvalho, Mireille Babineau, John C. Trueswell, Sandra R. Waxman & Anne Christophe - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • A construction based analysis of child directed speech.Thea Cameron-Faulkner, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello - 2003 - Cognitive Science 27 (6):843-873.
    The child directed speech of twelve English‐speaking motherswas analyzed in terms of utterance‐level constructions. First, the mothers' utterances were categorized in terms of general constructional categories such as Wh‐questions, copulas and transitives. Second, mothers' utterances within these categories were further specified in terms of the initial words that framed the utterance, item‐based phrases such as Are you …, I'll …, It's …, Let's …, What did … The findings were: (i) overall, only about 15% of all maternal utterances had SVO (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  • Conversational implicature and the referential use of descriptions.Thomas D. Bontly - 2005 - Philosophical Studies 125 (1):1 - 25.
    This paper enters the continuing fray over the semantic significance of Donnellan’s referential/attributive distinction. Some holdthat the distinction is at bottom a pragmatic one: i.e., that the difference between the referential use and the attributive use arises at the level of speaker’s meaning rather the level of sentence-or utterance-meaning. This view has recently been challenged byMarga Reimer andMichael Devitt, both of whom argue that the fact that descriptions are regularly, that is standardly, usedto refer defeats the pragmatic approach. The present (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Novel words in novel contexts: The role of distributional information in formclass category learning.Patricia A. Reeder, Elissa L. Newport & Richard N. Aslin - 2010 - In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 2063--2068.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Discovering syntactic hierarchies.Virginia Savova, Daniel Roy, Lauren Schmidt & Joshua B. Tenenbaum - unknown
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark