Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Clinging to Nothing: The Phenomenology and Metaphysics of Upādāna in Early Buddhism.Charles K. Fink - 2015 - Asian Philosophy 25 (1):15-33.
    The concept of clinging is absolutely central to early Buddhist thought. This article examines the concept from both a phenomenological and a metaphysical perspective and attempts to understand how it relates to the non-self doctrine and to the ultimate goal of Nibbāna. Unenlightened consciousness is consciousness centered on an ‘I’. It is also consciousness that is conditioned by and bound up with a being in the world. From a phenomenological perspective, clinging gives birth to the illusion of self, or what (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Meditation and Consciousness: Can We Experience Experience as Broken?Jake H. Davis - forthcoming - In Rocco J. Gennaro (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Consciousness. Routledge.
  • Philosophy of Mind and Cognitive Science Since 1980.Elizabeth Schier & John Sutton - 2014 - In Graham Oppy & Nick Trakakis (eds.), History of Philosophy in Australia and New Zealand. New York: Springer.
    If Australasian philosophers constitute the kind of group to which a collective identity or broadly shared self-image can plausibly be ascribed, the celebrated history of Australian materialism rightly lies close to its heart. Jack Smart’s chapter in this volume, along with an outstanding series of briefer essays in A Companion to Philosophy in Australia and New Zealand (Forrest 2010; Gold 2010; Koksvik 2010; Lycan 2010; Matthews 2010; Nagasawa 2010; Opie 2010; Stoljar 2010a), effectively describe the naturalistic realism of Australian philosophy (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • First-Person Investigations of Consciousness.Brentyn Ramm - 2016 - Dissertation, The Australian National University
    This dissertation defends the reliability of first-person methods for studying consciousness, and applies first-person experiments to two philosophical problems: the experience of size and of the self. In chapter 1, I discuss the motivations for taking a first-person approach to consciousness, the background assumptions of the dissertation and some methodological preliminaries. In chapter 2, I address the claim that phenomenal judgements are far less reliable than perceptual judgements (Schwitzgebel, 2011). I argue that the main errors and limitations in making phenomenal (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Self-Effacing Buddhist: No-Self in Early Buddhism and Contemplative Neuroscience.Paul Verhaeghen - 2017 - Contemporary Buddhism 18 (1):21-36.
    One of the core teachings of Buddhism is the doctrine of anattā. I argue that there is good evidence that anattā as understood in early Buddhism should be viewed less as a doctrine and a metaphysical pronouncement than as a soteriological claim – an appeal and a method to achieve, or move progressively closer to, liberation. This view opens up anattā to empirical scrutiny – does un-selfing, as an act, lead to liberation? Neuroimaging data collected on Buddhist or Buddhism-inspired meditators (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Searching for the High-I.Jim Hanson - 2005 - Asian Philosophy 15 (3):247 – 264.
    This paper questions the nature and existence of the ego and I from a Western and Eastern viewpoint, which has been a question for 2,500 years when the Buddha rejected the Brahman idea of ātman. The answer for an ego depends partly on the state of consciousness; the existence of the Western objectifying ego is undeniable in ordinary consciousness, but not in extraordinary consciousness with no objectifying. The subtle question remains about the existence of an I that is distinct from (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Ground of Knowing: On the Different Modes of Knowing According to the “Great Perfection”.Eran Laish - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (1):83-112.
    The phenomenon of ‘Knowing’ has a crucial role in Buddhist explanations about the determination of individual realities. According to these explanations particular modes of knowing are connected to specific ways of perceiving and, even, constituting reality. As the ideal state of reality according to Buddhist doctrine is that of an unconditioned liberation, numerous traditions have examined and described the mode of knowing which characterizes such a state. Among these, we find several traditions that related such a mode with a claim (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark