Switch to: References

Citations of:

Science-Mart: Privatizing American Science

Harvard University Press (2011)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Risk, Prudence and Moral Formation in the Laboratory.Paul Scherz - 2018 - Journal of Moral Education 47 (3):304-315.
    Sociologists of science have noted that the institutional cultures and practices of research tend to de-emphasize the risks produced in the lab, resulting in injuries and deaths in recent lab accidents and increased dangers for surrounding communities. In response to these accidents, science ethics and policy increasingly focus on risk management. One strategy to confront these problems is to implement more procedural safeguards, but ethnographies of science suggest that procedural forms can have the unintended effect of contributing to complacency. What (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Ultimate Think Tank: The Rise of the Santa Fe Institute Libertarian.Erik Baker - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (3-4):32-57.
    Why do corporations and wealthy philanthropists fund the human sciences? Examining the history of the Santa Fe Institute, a private research institute founded in the early 1980s, this article shows that funders can find as much value in the social worlds of the sciences they sponsor as in their ideas. SFI became increasingly dependent on funding from corporations and libertarian business leaders in the 1990s and 2000s. At the same time, its intellectual work came to focus on the underlying principles (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Managing Ambiguities at the Edge of Knowledge: Research Strategy and Artificial Intelligence Labs in an Era of Academic Capitalism.Steve G. Hoffman - 2017 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 42 (4):703-740.
    Many research-intensive universities have moved into the business of promoting technology development that promises revenue, impact, and legitimacy. While the scholarship on academic capitalism has documented the general dynamics of this institutional shift, we know less about the ground-level challenges of research priority and scientific problem choice. This paper unites the practice tradition in science and technology studies with an organizational analysis of decision-making to compare how two university artificial intelligence labs manage ambiguities at the edge of scientific knowledge. One (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Refuge of the Academy: Response to Socrates Tenured.Raphael Sassower - 2018 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 48 (1):63-70.
    In response to and as an elaboration on Robert Frodeman and Adam Briggle’s Socrates Tenured, I wish to recognize the notion of practical philosophers as both public intellectuals and as those who may find refuge in the academy in order to shed the pretense of expertise, on the one hand, and the esoteric engagement with topics irrelevant to the affairs of contemporary culture, on the other.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Un-Silencing an Experimental Technique: Listening to the Electrical Penetration Graph.Owen Marshall - 2022 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 47 (5):1011-1032.
    In scientific work, sonification is primarily thought of as a novel way to communicate post hoc research findings to lay audiences but only rarely, if ever, as a component of the research itself. This article argues that, rather than any inherent epistemological limitations of sound as a medium of scientific reasoning, this framing reflects a sociohistorical tendency to “silence” experimental techniques as they become widely adopted—both in terms of the literal silencing of noisy instrumentation and the elision of the role (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • AFHVS 2017 Presidential Address: The Purpose-Driven University: The Role of University Research in the Era of Science Commercialization.Leland L. Glenna - 2017 - Agriculture and Human Values 34 (4):1021-1031.
    As efforts to commercialize university research outputs continue, critics charge that universities and university scientists are failing to live up to their public-interest purpose. In this paper, I discuss the distinctions between public-interest and private-interest research institutions and how commercialization of university science may be undermining the public interest. I then use Jürgen Habermas’s concept of communicative action as the foundation for efforts to establish public spaces for ethical deliberation among scientists and university administrators. Such ethical deliberation is necessary to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Does Post-Truth Expand or Restrict Political Choice? Politics, Planning, and Expertise in a Post-Truth Environment.William T. Lynch - 2022 - Analyse & Kritik 44 (1):137-159.
    Steve Fuller has replied to my critique of his endorsement of a post-truth epistemology. I trace the divergence in our approach to social epistemology by examining our distinct responses to the principle of symmetry in the sociology of scientific knowledge. Fuller has extended the concept of symmetry and challenged the field to embrace a post-truth condition that flattens the difference between experts and the public. By contrast, I have criticized the concept of symmetry for policing the field to rule ideology (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Friends with Benefits! Distributed Cognition Hooks Up Cognitive and Social Conceptions of Science.P. D. Magnus & Ron McClamrock - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (8):1114-1127.
    One approach to science treats science as a cognitive accomplishment of individuals and defines a scientific community as an aggregate of individual inquirers. Another treats science as a fundamentally collective endeavor and defines a scientist as a member of a scientific community. Distributed cognition has been offered as a framework that could be used to reconcile these two approaches. Adam Toon has recently asked if the cognitive and the social can be friends at last. He answers that they probably cannot, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Three Stages of Modern Science.Henry Bauer - 2013 - Journal of Scientific Exploration 27 (3).
    The common view of science is a misunderstanding of today's science that does not recognize how "modern" science has changed since its inception in the 16th to 17th centuries. Science is generally taken to be objectively reliable because it uses "the scientific method" and because scientists work disinterestedly, publish openly, and keep one another honest through peer review. That common view was not too unrealistic in the early days and the glory days of modern science, but it is quite wrong (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Moral Limits of the Market: Science Commercialization and Religious Traditions.Jared L. Peifer, David R. Johnson & Elaine Howard Ecklund - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 157 (1):183-197.
    Entrepreneurs of contested commodities often face stakeholders engaged in market excluding boundary work driven by ethical considerations. For example, the conversion of academic scientific knowledge into technologies that can be owned and sold is a growing global trend and key stakeholders have different ethical responses to this contested commodity. Commercialization of science can be viewed as a good thing because people believe it bolsters economic growth and broadly benefits society. Others view it as bad because they believe it discourages basic (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Transition to Science 2.0: “Remoralizing” the Economy of Science.David Tyfield - 2013 - Spontaneous Generations 7 (1):29-48.
    The present is a moment of crisis and transition, both generally and specifically in “knowledge” and its institutions. Acknowledging this elicits the key questions: where are we? Where are we headed? What, if anything, can be done about this? And what can the “economics of science” contribute to this? This paper assumes a “cultural political economy of research & innovation” perspective to explore the current upheaval and transition in the system of academic knowledge production, at the confluence of accelerating commercialisation (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • A Cultural Political Economy of Research and Innovation in an Age of Crisis.David Tyfield - 2012 - Minerva 50 (2):149-167.
    Science and technology policy is both faced by unprecedented challenges and itself undergoing seismic shifts. First, policy is increasingly demanding of science that it fixes a set of epochal and global crises. On the other hand, practices of scientific research are changing rapidly regarding geographical dispersion, the institutions and identities of those involved and its forms of knowledge production and circulation. Furthermore, these changes are accelerated by the current upheavals in public funding of research, higher education and technology development in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Smaller is Better? Learning an Ethos and Worldview in Nanoengineering Education.Emily York - 2015 - NanoEthics 9 (2):109-122.
    In this article, I draw on ethnographic research to show how a particular ethos and worldview get produced in the context of “technical” education in a department of nanoengineering. Building on feminist science studies and communication theory, I argue that the curriculum introducing undergraduate students to scale implicitly teaches them an abstract and universal notion that smaller is better. I suggest that rather than smaller is better, a perspective that embraces context and specificity—such as the question “when, how, and for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Blinded by Science: Paula Stephan: How Economics Shapes Science. Cambridge and London: Harvard University Press, 2015, 384 Pp, $2195 PB.David Tyfield - 2017 - Metascience 26 (2):329-333.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Demise of Capitalism?: Lessons From an Entropic Perspective on the Current Crises.David Tyfield - 2013 - Journal of Critical Realism 12 (1):112 - 128.
    How are we to understand the multiple overlapping crises of the present? In a superbly enlightening synthesis of Marxian (critique of) political economy and systems theory, Robert Biel presents a compelling case for the importance of an entropic perspective, regarding both thermodynamic and informational flows that constitute and transform social systems. This perspective offers an insightful analysis of neoliberalism as an attempt to harness the entropic benefits of spontaneous and complex emergence for the purposes of capitalist accumulation. The current crises (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • New Economics of Science, Economics of Scientific Knowledge and Sociology of Science: The Case of Paul David.Matthieu Ballandonne - 2012 - Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (4):391-406.
    For a little more than twenty years, the terminology used in the economics of science has changed significantly with the development of expressions such as ?new economics of science? (NES) and ?economics of scientific knowledge? (ESK). This article seeks to shed light on the use of these different terminologies by studying the work of the economist of science Paul David. We aim to use his work as a case study in order to argue for a difference between NES and ESK (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Formal Models of the Scientific Community and the Value-Ladenness of Science.Vincenzo Politi - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 11 (4):1-23.
    In the past few years, social epistemologists have developed several formal models of the social organisation of science. While their robustness and representational adequacy has been analysed at length, the function of these models has begun to be discussed in more general terms only recently. In this article, I will interpret many of the current formal models of the scientific community as representing the latest development of what I will call the ‘Kuhnian project’. These models share with Kuhn a number (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Behind the Screens: Post-Truth, Populism, and the Circulation of Elites.William T. Lynch - 2021 - Analyse & Kritik 43 (2):367-393.
    The alleged emergence of a ‘post-truth’ regime links the rise of new forms of social media and the reemergence of political populism. Post-truth has theoretical roots in the interdisciplinary field of Science and Technology Studies, with sociologists of science arguing that both true and false claims should be explained by the same kinds of social causes. Most STS theorists have sought to deflect blame for post-truth, while at the same time enacting a normative turn, looking to deconstruct truth claims and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • COVID-19, Digital Health Technology and the Politics of the Unprecedented.Benjamin Chin-Yee & Dillon Wamsley - 2021 - Big Data and Society 8 (1).
    The COVID-19 global pandemic has stretched the capacities of public health institutions and health systems around the world, opening the door to a range of technologically-driven solutions. In this article, we seek to historicize the expanding role of digital health technologies and examine the political-economic context from which they have emerged. Drawing on critical insights from science and technology studies, we maintain that the rise of digital health technologies has been catalyzed by broad shifts in global health governance that have (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Assessing Biases, Relaxing Moralism: On Ground-Truthing Practices in Machine Learning Design and Application.Florian Jaton - 2021 - Big Data and Society 8 (1).
    This theoretical paper considers the morality of machine learning algorithms and systems in the light of the biases that ground their correctness. It begins by presenting biases not as a priori negative entities but as contingent external referents—often gathered in benchmarked repositories called ground-truth datasets—that define what needs to be learned and allow for performance measures. I then argue that ground-truth datasets and their concomitant practices—that fundamentally involve establishing biases to enable learning procedures—can be described by their respective morality, here (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Allure and Impossibility of an Algorithmic Future: A Lesson From Patočka’s Supercivilisation.Ľubica Učník - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (3):249-270.
    Our experience of the present is defined by numbers, graphs and, increasingly, an algorithmically calculated future, based on the mathematical and formal reasoning that began with the rise of modern science in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Today, this reasoning is further modified and extended in the form of computer-executed, algorithmic reasoning. Instead of fallible human reasoning, algorithms—based on mining databases for ‘information’—are seen to provide more efficient processes, offering fast solutions. In this paper, then, I will follow Jan Patočka, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Story of Nimble Knowledge Production in an Era of Academic Capitalism.Steve G. Hoffman - forthcoming - Theory and Society.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Evaluating Scientific Research Projects: The Units of Science in the Making.Mario Bunge - 2017 - Foundations of Science 22 (3):455-469.
    Original research is of course what scientists are expected to do. Therefore the research project is in many ways the unit of science in the making: it is the center of the professional life of the individual scientist and his coworkers. It is also the means towards the culmination of their specific activities: the original publication they hope to contribute to the scientific literature. The scientific project should therefore be of central interest to all the students of science, particularly the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • An “Entangled” History of Technoscience: Amit Prasad, Imperial Technoscience: Transnational Histories of MRI in the United States, Britain, and India. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2014, 232pp, $39.00 HB.Charles Thorpe - 2016 - Metascience 25 (2):267-273.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • “The Ennobling Unity of Science and Technology”: Materials Sciences and Engineering, the Department of Energy, and the Nanotechnology Enigma. [REVIEW]Matthew N. Eisler - 2013 - Minerva 51 (2):225-251.
    The ambiguous material identity of nanotechnology is a minor mystery of the history of contemporary science. This paper argues that nanotechnology functioned primarily in discourses of social, not physical or biological science, the problematic knowledge at stake concerning the economic value of state-supported basic science. The politics of taxonomy in the United States Department of Energy’s Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the 1990s reveals how scientists invoked the term as one of several competing and equally valid candidates for reframing (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Commercialization and the Limits of Well-Ordered Science.Manuela Fernández Pinto - 2015 - Perspectives on Science 23 (2):173-191.
    In recent decades, philosophers of science have become increasingly concerned with the social dimensions of scientific knowledge. Philosophers such as Helen Longino, Philip Kitcher, Miriam Solomon, Heather Douglas, and Janet Kourany have sought to incorporate the social aspects of science, while retaining the normative commitments of philosophy of science. Some of the major theoretical approaches in social epistemology of science, however, tend to ignore or underestimate the role that the current state of science organization plays in the production of scientific (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Should Anyone Care About Scientific Progress?Raphael Sassower - 2020 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 51 (1):58-90.
    Scientific progress has been understood as synonymous with the growth of knowledge and the advancement of humanity. In this brief survey, this concept is problematized both in rhetorical terms and within the neoliberal framework. Despite the sustained marketing of the scientific community and its funding agencies, the dangers associated with progress are explained and highlighted.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Variants of Epistemic Capitalism: Knowledge Production and the Accumulation of Worth in Commercial Biotechnology and the Academic Life Sciences.Maximilian Fochler - 2016 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 41 (5):922-948.
    Capitalist dynamics in knowledge production are not limited to situations in which economic interests influence researchers’ practices. Building on laboratory studies and the French “pragmatic” tradition in sociology, this article proposes an approach to tackle more pervasive capitalist logics at work in contemporary research and their consequences. It uses the term epistemic capitalism to denote the accumulation of capital, as worth made durable, through the act of doing research, in and beyond academia. In doing so, it conceptualizes capitalism primarily not (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Not Just Neoliberalism: Economization in US Science and Technology Policy.Elizabeth Popp Berman - 2014 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 39 (3):397-431.
    Recent scholarship in science, technology, and society has emphasized the neoliberal character of science today. This article draws on the history of US science and technology policy to argue against thinking of recent changes in science as fundamentally neoliberal, and for thinking of them instead as reflecting a process of “economization.” The policies that changed the organization of science in the United States included some that intervened in markets and others that expanded their reach, and were promoted by some groups (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Expert Judgment Versus Market Accounting in an Industrial Research Lab.Eric Giannella - 2016 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 41 (3):402-437.
    Accounts of change in contemporary research in industry and the academy often note the increasing coexistence of market and academic norms and practices. This article suggests that, at least in industry, these conflicting norms and practices are often preserved by loose coupling between market pressures and the research organization. Based on a two-year case study, this article examines the imposition of tight coupling at an industry lab that had previously been able to maintain some of the norms and practices associated (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Normalizing Complaint: Scientists and the Challenge of Commercialization.Kelly Joslin Holloway - 2015 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 40 (5):744-765.
    In recent decades, academic science has increasingly been directed toward commercializable ends by neoliberal governments. In this article, I outline a concern that academic scientists have not been consulted about the transformation of science, but nevertheless, in some ways accept commercialization as the way things are done. I focus on the ways in which academic scientists attempt to exercise agency, albeit within the parameters of the neoliberal knowledge economy. In this economy, scientific inquiry has transformed to be focused more on (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Portfolios of Worth: Capitalizing on Basic and Clinical Problems in Biomedical Research Groups.Sarah de Rijcke, Thomas Franssen & Alexander Rushforth - 2019 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 44 (2):209-236.
    How are “interesting” research problems identified and made durable by academic researchers, particularly in situations defined by multiple evaluation principles? Building on two case studies of research groups working on rare diseases in academic biomedicine, we explore how group leaders arrange their groups to encompass research problems that latch onto distinct evaluation principles by dividing and combining work into “basic-oriented” and “clinical-oriented” spheres of inquiry. Following recent developments in the sociology of valuation comparing academics to capitalist entrepreneurs in pursuit of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Intellectual Property and Agricultural Science and Innovation in Germany and the United States.Leland L. Glenna & Barbara Brandl - 2017 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 42 (4):622-656.
    In the 1950s and 1960s, prominent institutional economists in the United States offered what became the orthodox theory on the obstacles to commercializing scientific knowledge. According to this theory, scientific knowledge has inherent qualities that make it a public good. Since the 1970s, however, neoliberalism has emphasized the need to convert public goods to private goods to enhance economic growth, and this theory has had global impacts on policies governing the generation and diffusion of scientific research and innovation. We critique (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Reductionism in Epigenetics.Stephen T. Casper - 2018 - History of the Human Sciences 31 (1):132-135.
  • The Problem of Expertise in Knowledge Societies.Reiner Grundmann - 2017 - Minerva 55 (1):25-48.
    This paper puts forward a theoretical framework for the analysis of expertise and experts in contemporary societies. It argues that while prevailing approaches have come to see expertise in various forms and functions, they tend to neglect the broader historical and societal context, and importantly the relational aspect of expertise. This will be discussed with regard to influential theoretical frameworks, such as laboratory studies, regulatory science, lay expertise, post-normal science, and honest brokers. An alternative framework of expertise is introduced, showing (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • Plastic Neuroscience: Studying What the Brain Cares About.Joseph Dumit - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  • Gift Versus Trade: On the Culture of Science Communication.Ilya Kasavin - 2019 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 49 (6):453-472.
    This article aims at a critical reevaluation of the trading zone concept. It starts from a case study of the Faraday–Whewell collaboration in coming to terms with electrolysis experiments. The case is supposed to be an example of a trade zone of science/philosophy interaction though it demonstrates the unequal nature of the “trade.” This requires the analysis to log in some details concerning Galison’s metaphor of trading zones, which reveals its market-oriented connotations. The following criticism of the market metaphor for (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • To Know or Better Not To: Agnotology and the Social Construction of Ignorance in Commercially Driven Research.Manuela Fernández Pinto - 2017 - Science and Technology Studies 30 (2):53-72.
    With an innovative perspective on the social character of ignorance production, agnotology has been a fruitful approach for understanding the social and epistemological consequences of the interaction between industry and scientific research. In this paper, I argue that agnotology, or the study of ignorance, contributes to a better understanding of commercially driven research and its societal impact, showing the ways in which industrial interests have reshaped the epistemic aims of traditional scientific practices, turning them into mechanisms of ignorance production. To (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Maladies of Enlightenment Science.T. Wyatt - 2017 - Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 17 (1):51-62.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Review of Three Books on Science: Trust, Corporate Influence, and Militarization. [REVIEW]Sheldon Krimsky - 2022 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 47 (1):217-230.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Re-invent Yourself! How Demands for Innovativeness Reshape Epistemic Practices.Ruth I. Falkenberg - 2021 - Minerva 59 (4):423-444.
    In the current research landscape, there are increasing demands for research to be innovative and cutting-edge. At the same time, concerns are voiced that as a consequence of neoliberal regimes of research governance, innovative research becomes impeded. In this paper, I suggest that to gain a better understanding of these dynamics, it is indispensable to scrutinise current demands for innovativeness as a distinct way of ascribing worth to research. Drawing on interviews and focus groups produced in a close collaboration with (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Science in a New Mode: Good Old (Theoretical) Science Versus Brave New (Commodified) Knowledge Production?Tarja Knuuttila - 2013 - Science & Education 22 (10):2443-2461.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • How Peer-Review Constrains Cognition: On the Frontline in the Knowledge Sector.Stephen J. Cowley - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  • Governing Occupational Exposure Using Thresholds: A Policy Biased Toward Industry.Emmanuel Henry - 2021 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 46 (5):953-974.
    Strongly grounded in scientific knowledge, the instrument known as occupational exposure limits or threshold limit values has changed government modalities of exposure to hazardous chemicals in workplaces, transforming both the substance of the problem at hand and the power dynamics between the actors involved. Some of the characteristics of this instrument favor the interests of industries at the expense of employees, their representatives, and the authorities in charge of regulating these risks. First, this instrument can be analyzed as a boundary (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • On the Commodification of Science: The Programmatic Dimension.Marcos Barbosa de Oliveira - 2013 - Science & Education 22 (10):2463-2483.
  • Beyond Commercialization: Science, Higher Education and the Culture of Neoliberalism.Daniel Lee Kleinman, Noah Weeth Feinstein & Greg Downey - 2013 - Science & Education 22 (10):2385-2401.
  • Financializing Epistemic Norms in Contemporary Biomedical Innovation.Mark Robinson - 2019 - Synthese 196 (11):4391-4407.
    The rapid, recent emergence of new medical knowledge models has engendered a dizzying number of new medical initiatives, programs and approaches. Fields such as evidence-based medicine and translational medicine all promise a renewed relationship between knowledge and medicine. The question for philosophy and other fields has been whether these new models actually achieve their promises to bring about better kinds of medical knowledge—a question that compels scholars to analyze each model’s epistemic claims. Yet, these analyses may miss critical components that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The Rise of Computing Research in East Africa: The Relationship Between Funding, Capacity and Research Community in a Nascent Field.Matthew Harsh, Ravtosh Bal, Jameson Wetmore, G. Pascal Zachary & Kerry Holden - 2018 - Minerva 56 (1):35-58.
    The emergence of vibrant research communities of computer scientists in Kenya and Uganda has occurred in the context of neoliberal privatization, commercialization, and transnational capital flows from donors and corporations. We explore how this funding environment configures research culture and research practices, which are conceptualized as two main components of a research community. Data come from a three-year longitudinal study utilizing interview, ethnographic and survey data collected in Nairobi and Kampala. We document how administrators shape research culture by building academic (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Governing with Ignorance: Understanding the Australian Food Regulator’s Response to Nano Food.Kristen Lyons & Naomi Smith - 2017 - NanoEthics 12 (1):27-38.
    This paper examines regulatory responses to the presence of previously undetected and unlabelled nanoparticles in the Australian food system. Until 2015, the Australian regulatory body Food Standards Australia New Zealand denied that nanoparticles were present in Australian food. However, and despite repeated claims from Australia’s food regulator, research commissioned by civil society group Friends of the Earth has demonstrated that nanoparticles are deliberately included as ingredients in an array of food available for sale in Australia. This paper critically examines how (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Databall: Sabina Leonelli: Data-centric biology: A philosophical study. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016, 275 pp., $35.00 PB.Philip Mirowski - 2018 - Metascience 27 (1):83-85.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark