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  1. Can a Daoist Sage Have Close Relationships with Other Human Beings?Joanna Iwanowska - 2017 - Diametros 52:23-46.
    This paper explores the compatibility between the Daoist art of emptying one’s heart-mind and the art of creating close relationships. The fact that a Daoist sage is characterized by an empty heart-mind makes him somewhat different from an average human being: since a full heart-mind is characteristic of the human condition, the sage transcends what makes us human. This could alienate him from others and make him incapable of developing close relationships. The research goal of this paper is to investigate (...)
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  • Bibliografía seleccionada y comentada sobre Taoísmo Clásico : Obras generales y Zhuāng zǐ.Javier Bustamante Donas & Juan Luis Varona - 2015 - 'Ilu. Revista de Ciencias de Las Religiones 20:269-311.
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  • Confucianism as Anthropological Machine.Eske Møllgaard - 2010 - Asian Philosophy 20 (2):127-140.
    Confucianism is a kind of humanism. Confucian humanism presupposes, however, a divisive act that separates human and nonhuman. This paper shows that the split between the human and the nonhuman is central to Mencius' moral psychology, and it argues that Confucianism is an anthropological machine in the sense of the term used by Giorgio Agamben. I consider the main points of early Daoist critique of Confucian humanism. A comparative analysis of Herman Melville's novella 'Bartleby the Scrivener' reveals the limitation of (...)
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  • The Zhuangzi and You 遊: Defining an Ideal Without Contradiction.Alan Levinovitz - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (4):479-496.
    You 遊 is a crucial term for understanding the Zhuangzi . Translated as “play,” “free play,” and “wandering,” it is usually defined as an ideal, playful Zhuangzian way of being. There are two problems with this definition. The first is logical: the Zhuangzi cannot consistently recommend playfulness as an ideal, since doing so vitiates the essence of you —it becomes an ethical imperative instead of an activity freely undertaken for its own sake. The second problem is performative: arguments for playful (...)
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  • Who Does the Sounding? The Metaphysics of the First-Person Pronoun in the Zhuangzi.Thomas Ming - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (1):57-79.
    In classical Chinese wu 吾 is commonly employed as the first-person pronoun, similar to wo 我 that retains its use in modern Chinese. Although these two words are usually understood as stylistic variants of “I,” “me,” and “myself,” Chinese scholars of the Zhuangzi 莊子 have long been aware of the possible differences in their semantics, especially in the philosophical context of discussing the relation between the self and the person, as evinced by their occurrences in the much-discussed line “Now I (...)
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  • “Emotions That Do Not Move”: Zhuangzi and Stoics on Self-Emerging Feelings.David Machek - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (4):521-544.
    This essay develops a comparison between the Stoic and Daoist theories of emotions in order to provide a new interpretation of the emotional life of the wise person according to the Daoist classic Zhuangzi 莊子, and to shed light on larger divergences between the Greco-Roman and Chinese intellectual traditions. The core argument is that both Zhuangzi and the Stoics believed that there is a peculiar kind of emotional responses that emerge by themselves and are therefore wholly natural, since they do (...)
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