Switch to: References

Citations of:

How doctors think: clinical judgment and the practice of medicine

New York: Oxford University Press (2006)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Psychopathy: Morally Incapacitated Persons.Heidi Maibom - 2017 - In Thomas Schramme & Steven Edwards (eds.), Handbook of the Philosophy of Medicine. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 1109-1129.
    After describing the disorder of psychopathy, I examine the theories and the evidence concerning the psychopaths’ deficient moral capacities. I first examine whether or not psychopaths can pass tests of moral knowledge. Most of the evidence suggests that they can. If there is a lack of moral understanding, then it has to be due to an incapacity that affects not their declarative knowledge of moral norms, but their deeper understanding of them. I then examine two suggestions: it is their deficient (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Person centered healthcare and clinical research: the necessity of an evolutionary hierarchy of knowing and doing.Michael Loughlin & Peter Wyer - unknown
    Effective person-centred care requires recognition of the personhood not only of patients but of practitioners. This chapter explores the consequences of this recognition for major debates in medical epistemology, regarding clinical reasoning and the relationship between research and practice. For too long these debates have been dominated by false dichotomies - subjectivity versus objectivity, judgement versus evidence, reason versus emotion. Based on flawed understandings of such core concepts as “objectivity” and “engagement”, this distorted dissection of the subject-object relationship has served (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • To Tell the Truth, the Whole Truth, May Do Patients Harm: The Problem of the Nocebo Effect for Informed Consent.Rebecca Erwin Wells & Ted J. Kaptchuk - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (3):22-29.
    The principle of informed consent obligates physicians to explain possible side effects when prescribing medications. This disclosure may itself induce adverse effects through expectancy mechanisms known as nocebo effects, contradicting the principle of nonmaleficence. Rigorous research suggests that providing patients with a detailed enumeration of every possible adverse event—especially subjective self-appraised symptoms—can actually increase side effects. Describing one version of what might happen (clinical “facts”) may actually create outcomes that are different from what would have happened without this information (another (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  • Yearning for certainty and the critique of medicine as “science”.Mark H. Waymack - 2009 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (3):215-229.
    A debate has simmered concerning the nature of clinical reasoning, especially diagnostic reasoning: Is it a “science” or an “art”? The trend since the seventeenth century has been to regard medical reasoning as scientific reasoning, and the most advanced clinical reasoning is the most scientific. However, in recent years, several scholars have argued that clinical reasoning is clearly not “science” reasoning, but is in fact a species of narratival or hermeneutical reasoning. The study reviews this dispute, and argues that in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • ‘Deep brain stimulation is no ON/OFF-switch’: an ethnography of clinical expertise in psychiatric practice.Maarten van Westen, Erik Rietveld, Annemarie van Hout & Damiaan Denys - 2021 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 22 (1):129-148.
    Despite technological innovations, clinical expertise remains the cornerstone of psychiatry. A clinical expert does not only have general textbook knowledge, but is sensitive to what is demanded for the individual patient in a particular situation. A method that can do justice to the subjective and situation-specific nature of clinical expertise is ethnography. Effective deep brain stimulation (DBS) for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) involves an interpretive, evaluative process of optimizing stimulation parameters, which makes it an interesting case to study clinical expertise. The (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Using practical wisdom to facilitate ethical decision-making: a major empirical study of phronesis in the decision narratives of doctors.Chris Turner, Alan Brockie, Catherine Weir, Catherine Hale, Aisha Y. Malik & Mervyn Conroy - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-13.
    BackgroundMedical ethics has recently seen a drive away from multiple prescriptive approaches, where physicians are inundated with guidelines and principles, towards alternative, less deontological perspectives. This represents a clear call for theory building that does not produce more guidelines. Phronesis (practical wisdom) offers an alternative approach for ethical decision-making based on an application of accumulated wisdom gained through previous practice dilemmas and decisions experienced by practitioners. Phronesis, as an ‘executive virtue’, offers a way to navigate the practice virtues for any (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Role of Philosophy in Modern Medicine.Mbih Jerome Tosam - 2014 - Open Journal of Philosophy 4 (1):75-84.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Experiential knowledge in clinical medicine: use and justification.Mark R. Tonelli & Devora Shapiro - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (2):67-82.
    Within the evidence-based medicine construct, clinical expertise is acknowledged to be both derived from primary experience and necessary for optimal medical practice. Primary experience in medical practice, however, remains undervalued. Clinicians’ primary experience tends to be dismissed by EBM as unsystematic or anecdotal, a source of bias rather than knowledge, never serving as the “best” evidence to support a clinical decision. The position that clinical expertise is necessary but that primary experience is untrustworthy in clinical decision-making is epistemically incoherent. Here (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Evidence and the end of medicine.Keld Thorgaard & Uffe Juul Jensen - 2011 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (3):273-280.
    Fifty years ago, in 1961, Feinstein published his first path-breaking articles leading to his seminal work Clinical Judgement and to the establishment of clinical epidemiology. Feinstein had an Aristotelian approach to scientific method: methods must be adapted to the material examined. Feinstein died 10 years ago and few years before his death he concluded that efforts to promote a person-oriented medicine had failed. He criticised medicine for not having recognized that only persons can suitably observe, evaluate and rate their own (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Courts, Expertise and Resource Allocation: Is there a Judicial 'Legitimacy Problem'?Keith Syrett - 2014 - Public Health Ethics 7 (2):112-122.
    Courts are increasingly obliged to adjudicate upon challenges to allocative decisions in healthcare, but their involvement continues to be regarded with unease, imperilling the legitimacy of the judicial role in this context. A central reason for this is that judges are perceived to lack sufficient expertise to determine allocative questions. This article critically appraises the claim of lack of judicial expertise through an examination of the various components of a limit-setting decision. It is argued that the inexpertise argument is weak (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Doctor(s) in House: An Analysis of the Evolution of the Television Doctor-Hero. [REVIEW]Elena C. Strauman & Bethany C. Goodier - 2011 - Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (1):31-46.
    The medical drama and its central character, the doctor-hero have been a mainstay of popular television. House M.D. offers a new (and problematic) iteration of the doctor-hero. House eschews the generic conventions of the “television doctor” by being neither the idealized television doctor of the past, nor the more recent competent but often fallible physicians in entertainment texts. Instead, his character is a fragmented text which privileges the biomedical over the personal or emotional with the ultimate goal of scientifically uncovering (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Just a paradigm: evidence-based medicine in epistemological context.Miriam Solomon - 2011 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 1 (3):451-466.
    Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) developed from the work of clinical epidemiologists at McMaster University and Oxford University in the 1970s and 1980s and self-consciously presented itself as a "new paradigm" called "evidence-based medicine" in the early 1990s. The techniques of the randomized controlled trial, systematic review and meta-analysis have produced an extensive and powerful body of research. They have also generated a critical literature that raises general concerns about its methods. This paper is a systematic review of the critical literature. It (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • Musings on reflective practice as a grand idea.Derek Sellman - 2010 - Nursing Philosophy 11 (3):149-150.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The “Medical friendship” or the true meaning of the doctor-patient relationship from two complementary perspectives: Goya and Laín.Roger Ruiz-Moral - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (1):111-117.
    This essay aims to broaden the understanding of the nature of the physician–patient relationship. To do so, the concept of medical philia that Pedro Laín Entralgo proposes is analysed and is considered taking into consideration the relational trait of the human being and the structure of human action as a story of the permanent tension that exists between freedom and truth, where the ontological foundation of the hermeneutic of the "Gift" and the analogy of “Love” as the central dynamic of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Institutional Futility Policies are Inherently Unfair.Philip M. Rosoff - 2013 - HEC Forum 25 (3):191-209.
    For many years a debate has raged over what constitutes futile medical care, if patients have a right to demand what doctors label as futile, and whether physicians should be obliged to provide treatments that they think are inappropriate. More recently, the argument has shifted away from the difficult project of definitions, to outlining institutional policies and procedures that take a measured and patient-by-patient approach to deciding if an existing or desired intervention is futile. The prototype is the Texas Advance (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Equipment for Thinking: or Why Kenneth Burke is Still Worth Reading.Jennifer Richards - 2014 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (4):363-375.
    In a market place crowded with practical rhetoric books what educational value could a challenging work such as Kenneth Burke’s A Rhetoric of Motives possibly have? Burke knows but doesn’t use the terminology of the classical art and rather than analysing the persuasive rhetoric of well-known speeches to equip us with strategies, he weaves his way around literary texts, teasing out meanings that their authors something intended, sometimes did not. Yet, despite such difficulties, A Rhetoric of Motives is a practical (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Genetic Counseling, Professional Values, and Habitus: An Analysis of Disability Narratives in Textbooks.Amy R. Reed - 2018 - Journal of Medical Humanities 39 (4):515-533.
    This article analyzes narrative illustrations in genetic counseling textbooks as a way of understanding professional habitus--the dispositions that motivate professional behavior. In particular, this analysis shows that there are significant differences in how the textbooks' expository and narrative portions represent Down syndrome, genetic counseling practice, and patient behaviors. While the narrative portions of the text position the genetic counseling profession as working in service to the values of genetic medicine, the expository portions represent genetic counselors as neutral parties. Ultimately, this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Last Laughs: Gallows Humor and Medical Education.Nicole M. Piemonte - 2015 - Journal of Medical Humanities 36 (4):375-390.
    This paper argues that “backstage” gallows humor among clinical mentors not only affects medical students’ perceptions of what it means to be a doctor but is also symptomatic and indicative of a much larger problem in medicine—namely, the failure to attend fully to the complexity and profundity of the lived experiences of illness, suffering, and death. Reorienting the discourse surrounding gallows humor away from whether or in what context it is acceptable and toward the reasons why doctors feel the need (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Chatbot breakthrough in the 2020s? An ethical reflection on the trend of automated consultations in health care.Jaana Parviainen & Juho Rantala - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (1):61-71.
    Many experts have emphasised that chatbots are not sufficiently mature to be able to technically diagnose patient conditions or replace the judgements of health professionals. The COVID-19 pandemic, however, has significantly increased the utilisation of health-oriented chatbots, for instance, as a conversational interface to answer questions, recommend care options, check symptoms and complete tasks such as booking appointments. In this paper, we take a proactive approach and consider how the emergence of task-oriented chatbots as partially automated consulting systems can influence (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Objectivity in Science: New Perspectives From Science and Technology Studies.Flavia Padovani, Alan Richardson & Jonathan Y. Tsou (eds.) - 2015 - Cham: Boston Studies in the Philosophy and History of Science, vol. 310. Springer.
    This highly multidisciplinary collection discusses an increasingly important topic among scholars in science and technology studies: objectivity in science. It features eleven essays on scientific objectivity from a variety of perspectives, including philosophy of science, history of science, and feminist philosophy. Topics addressed in the book include the nature and value of scientific objectivity, the history of objectivity, and objectivity in scientific journals and communities. Taken individually, the essays supply new methodological tools for theorizing what is valuable in the pursuit (...)
  • Science: a limited source of knowledge and authority in the care of patients*. A Review and Analysis of: ‘How Doctors Think. Clinical Judgement and the Practice of Medicine.’Montgomery, K. [REVIEW]Andrew Miles - 2007 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (4):545-563.
  • On the interface between science, medicine, faith and values in the individualization of clinical practice: a review and analysis of 'Medicine of the Person' Cox, J., Campbell, A. V. & Fulford, K. W. M., eds (2007). [REVIEW]Andrew Miles - 2009 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (6):1000-1024.
  • On a Medicine of the Whole Person: away from scientistic reductionism and towards the embrace of the complex in clinical practice.Andrew Miles - 2009 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (6):941-949.
  • Models in the balance: evidence‐based medicine versus evidence‐informed individualized care.Andrew Miles & Michael Loughlin - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (4):531-536.
  • Medicine and evidence: knowledge and action in clinical practice.Andrew Miles, Michael Loughlin & Andreas Polychronis - 2007 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (4):481-503.
  • Evidence for practice and the authority of experts: there can be no former without the latter: a commentary an Nunn (2008).Andrew Miles - 2008 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (5):679-681.
  • Evidence‐based healthcare, clinical knowledge and the rise of personalised medicine.Andrew Miles, Michael Loughlin & Andreas Polychronis - 2008 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (5):621-649.
  • Continuing the evidence‐based health care debate in 2006. The progress and price of EBM.Andrew Miles & Michael Loughlin - 2006 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (4):385-398.
  • In-verse reflection: structured creative writing exercises to promote reflective learning in medical students.David McLean, Neville Chiavaroli, Charlotte Denniston & Martin Richardson - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (3):493-504.
    Medical educators recognize the value of reflection for medical students and the role creative writing can play in fostering this. However, direct creative writing tasks can be challenging for many students, particularly those with limited experience in the arts and humanities. An alternative strategy is to utilize an indirect approach, engaging students with structured tasks that obliquely encourage reflection. This paper reports one such approach. We refer to this approach as in-verse reflection, playing on both the structure of the writing (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • “Personal Knowledge” in Medicine and the Epistemic Shortcomings of Scientism.Hugh Marshall McHugh & Simon Thomas Walker - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (4):577-585.
    In this paper, we outline a framework for understanding the different kinds of knowledge required for medical practice and use this framework to show how scientism undermines aspects of this knowledge. The framework is based on Michael Polanyi’s claim that knowledge is primarily the product of the contemplations and convictions of persons and yet at the same time carries a sense of universality because it grasps at reality. Building on Polanyi’s ideas, we propose that knowledge can be described along two (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Moral Expertise in the Clinic: Lessons Learned from Medicine and Science.Leah McClimans & Anne Slowther - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (4):401-415.
    Philosophers and others have questioned whether or not expertise in morality is possible. This debate is not only theoretical, but also affects the perceived legitimacy of clinical ethicists. One argument against moral expertise is that in a pluralistic society with competing moral theories no one can claim expertise regarding what another ought morally to do. There are simply too many reasonable moral values and intuitions that affect theory choice and its application; expertise is epistemically uniform. In this article, we discuss (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • The role of experts in the methodology of economics.Carlo Martini - 2014 - Journal of Economic Methodology 21 (1):77-91.
    Is subjective expert judgment a source of evidence in economics? In this paper, I will argue that it is, on a par with other sources like modeling, statistics, experimental, etc. I will also argue that it is not derivative, that is, reducible to the previous ones. But what is exactly the role of experts in economics? The contribution to the current methodological debate that I propose not only takes the role of expertise in economics as indispensable, but also suggests a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Clinical Decision-Making, Gender Bias, Virtue Epistemology, and Quality Healthcare.James A. Marcum - 2017 - Topoi 36 (3):501-508.
    Robust clinical decision-making depends on valid reasoning and sound judgment and is essential for delivering quality healthcare. It is often susceptible, however, to a clinician’s biases such as towards a patient’s age, gender, race, or socioeconomic status. Gender bias in particular has a deleterious impact, which frequently results in cognitive myopia so that a clinician is unable to make an accurate diagnosis because of a patient’s gender—especially for female patients. Virtue epistemology provides a means for confronting gender bias in clinical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Understanding medical symptoms: a conceptual review and analysis.Kirsti Malterud, Ann Dorrit Guassora, Anette Hauskov Graungaard & Susanne Reventlow - 2015 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 36 (6):411-424.
    The aim of this article is to present a conceptual review and analysis of symptom understanding. Subjective bodily sensations occur abundantly in the normal population and dialogues about symptoms take place in a broad range of contexts, not only in the doctor’s office. Our review of symptom understanding proceeds from an initial subliminal awareness by way of attribution of meaning and subsequent management, with and without professional involvement. We introduce theoretical perspectives from phenomenology, semiotics, social interactionism, and discourse analysis. Drew (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Introduction: Evidence, Expertise and Argumentation in Evidence-Based Medicine.Fabrizio Macagno & Carlo Martini - 2020 - Topoi 40 (2):295-298.
    [1st paragraph] A philosophical discussion on evidence-based medicine (EBM) can be probably perceived almost as an oxymoron. How can “the process of systematically finding, appraising, and using contemporaneous research findings as the basis for clinical decisions” (Jenicek 2012: 23) be compatible with the critical and systematic examination of fundamental problems such as the nature of being, reality, thinking, values and perception? How can a scientific field focused mainly on the search and evaluation of evidence and aimed at solid quantifications of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Phronesis as an ideal in professional medical ethics: some preliminary positionings and problematics.Kristján Kristjánsson - 2015 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 36 (5):299-320.
    Phronesis has become a buzzword in contemporary medical ethics. Yet, the use of this single term conceals a number of significant conceptual controversies based on divergent philosophical assumptions. This paper explores three of them: on phronesis as universalist or relativist, generalist or particularist, and natural/painless or painful/ambivalent. It also reveals tensions between Alasdair MacIntyre’s take on phronesis, typically drawn upon in professional ethics discourses, and Aristotle’s original concept. The paper offers these four binaries as a possible analytical framework for classifying (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  • Against Interpretability: a Critical Examination of the Interpretability Problem in Machine Learning.Maya Krishnan - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (3):487-502.
    The usefulness of machine learning algorithms has led to their widespread adoption prior to the development of a conceptual framework for making sense of them. One common response to this situation is to say that machine learning suffers from a “black box problem.” That is, machine learning algorithms are “opaque” to human users, failing to be “interpretable” or “explicable” in terms that would render categorization procedures “understandable.” The purpose of this paper is to challenge the widespread agreement about the existence (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  • The lived body as a medical topic: an argument for an ethically informed epistemology.Anna Luise Kirkengen & Eline Thornquist - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1095-1101.
  • Reviews in Medical Ethics.Nancy M. P. King - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (1):147-148.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Clinical judgement and the medical profession.Gunver S. Kienle & Helmut Kiene - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (4):621-627.
  • Fictional father?: Oliver Sacks and the revalidation of pathography.Andrew John Hull - 2013 - Medical Humanities 39 (2):105-114.
    This paper is a revalidation of Oliver Sacks's role in the development of medicine's narrative turn and, as such, a reinterpretation of the history of narrative in medicine. It suggests that, from the late 1960s, Sacks pioneered in his ‘Romantic Science’ a new medical mode that reunited the seemingly incommensurable art and science of medicine while also offering a way for medical humanities to shape clinical reasoning more effectively.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Polanyi's tacit knowing and the relevance of epistemology to clinical medicine.Stephen G. Henry - 2010 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (2):292-297.
    Most clinicians take for granted a simple, reductionist understanding of medical knowledge that is at odds with how they actually practice medicine; routine medical decisions incorporate more complicated kinds of information than most standard accounts of medical reasoning suggest. A better understanding of the structure and function of knowledge in medicine can lead to practical improvements in clinical medicine. This understanding requires some familiarity with epistemology, the study of knowledge and its structure, in medicine. Michael Polanyi's theory of tacit knowing (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  • ‘How do you know what Aunt Martha looks like?’ A video elicitation study exploring tacit clues in doctor-patient interactions.Stephen G. Henry, Jane H. Forman & Michael D. Fetters - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):933-939.
  • Ethico-Political aspects of clinical judgment in opportunistic screening for cognitive impairment: Arendtian and aristotelian perspectives.Martin Gunnarson & Kristin Zeiler - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (3):495-507.
    This article examines a population-based opportunistic screening practice for cognitive impairment that takes place at a hospital in Sweden. At the hospital, there is a routine in place that stipulates that all patients over the age of 65 who are admitted to the ward will be offered testing for cognitive impairment, unless they have been tested within the last six months or have been diagnosed with any form of cognitive impairment. However, our analysis shows that this routine is not universally (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Whose social values? Evaluating Canada’s ‘death of evidence’ controversy.Maya J. Goldenberg - 2015 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 45 (3):404-424.
    With twentieth- and twenty-first-century philosophy of science’s unfolding acceptance of the nature of scientific inquiry being value-laden, the persistent worry has been that there are no means for legitimate negotiation of the social or non-epistemic values that enter into science. The rejection of the value-free ideal in science has thereby been coupled with the spectres of indiscriminate relativism and bias in scientific inquiry. I challenge this view in the context of recently expressed concerns regarding Canada's death of evidence controversy. The (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Documenting insanity: Paperwork and patient narratives in psychiatric history.Liana Glew - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (3-4):3-31.
    Paperwork plays a key role in a how institutions accommodate, refuse, or manage disabled people. This article develops modes for reading paperwork that build on each other, beginning with (a) recognizing the institutional pressures at work in shaping bureaucratic practices, then (b) considering how a person's relationship to disability influences how they might encounter these practices, and ultimately (c) noticing how the encounter between disabled/mad people and an institution might create something new, what the author calls archival excess. These methods (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Robot decisions: on the importance of virtuous judgment in clinical decision making.Petra Gelhaus - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):883-887.
  • Imperfection, practice and humility in clinical ethics.Kim Garchar - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1051-1056.
  • Rhetoric and argumentation: how clinical practice guidelines think.Jonathan Fuller - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (3):433-441.
    Introduction: Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are an important source of justification for clinical decisions in modern evidence-based practice. Yet, we have given little attention to how they argue their evidence. In particular, how do CPGs argue for treatment with long-term medications that are increasingly prescribed to older patients? Approach and rationale: I selected six disease-specific guidelines recommending treatment with five of the medication classes most commonly prescribed for seniors in Ontario, Canada. I considered the stated aims of these CPGs and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Can Doctors Maintain Good Character? An Examination of Physician Lives.Saba Fatima - 2016 - Journal of Medical Humanities 37 (4):419-433.
    Can doctors maintain good character? This paper shifts the focus from patient care to ethical considerations that bear on the physician and impact her as a person. By decentering patient care, the paper highlights certain factors that habituate a particular way of reasoning that is not conducive to inculcating good character. Such factors include, standards of professionalism, being influenced by external monitors, and emphasis on adherence to guidelines. While such factors may benefit patients, they often adversely affect the character of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark