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  1. The Effect of Similarity on Evaluative Priming: Higher Similarity Predicts Stronger Congruency Effects.Juliane Burghardt - unknown
    The evaluative priming paradigm aims to uncover the processes underlying evaluations. For this purpose, this paradigm presents a sequence of two or more stimuli varying on the valence dimension to which participants must provide a response. The “standard” evaluative priming effect is a relative facilitation of the required responses in congruent trials compared to incongruent trials. The following thesis argues that this evaluative priming effect depends on prime-target similarity, with higher similarity between prime and target leading to larger priming effects. (...)
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  • Automatic Constructive Appraisal: A Reply to the Commentaries of Parkinson and Kuppens.Agnes Moors - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (2):161-162.
    My reply to the comments of Parkinson (2010) and Kuppens (2010) is organized in three parts. The first part deals with Parkinson’s claim that the scope of our research is limited because no real emotions were elicited. I suggest that the outcomes in our studies are structurally similar to real emotions but that they lack intensity. In the second part, I try to correct three potential misunderstandings regarding the nature of the comparison process that I proposed. In the third part, (...)
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  • Recognizing Desirability: Is Goal Comparison Necessary?Brian Parkinson - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (2):159-160.
    Moors and colleagues’ clever studies demonstrate that goal-relevant stimuli can produce rapid, unintentional affective priming, but not necessarily that primes are compared with goal representations following onset. Instead, prior attunements based on changing concerns may prespecify reward value. Even if both these processes count as emotion-relevant appraisal, none of the evidence rules out appraisal-independent emotion under other, unsampled, circumstances, including those where emotions develop as cumulative responses to unfolding and responsive environments rather than as momentary reactions to briefly-presented simple stimuli. (...)
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  • Automatic Constructive Appraisal as a Candidate Cause of Emotion.Agnes Moors - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (2):139-156.
    Critics of appraisal theory have difficulty accepting appraisal (with its constructive flavor) as an automatic process, and hence as a potential cause of most emotions. In response, some appraisal theorists have argued that appraisal was never meant as a causal process but as a constituent of emotional experience. Others have argued that appraisal is a causal process, but that it can be either rule-based or associative, and that the associative variant can be automatic. This article first proposes empirically investigating whether (...)
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  • Can Implicit Appraisal Concepts Produce Emotion-Specific Effects? A Focus on Unfairness and Anger.Eddie Mw Tong, Deborah H. Tan & Yan Lin Tan - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):449-460.
    This research examined whether the non-conscious activation of an implicit appraisal concept could affect responses associated with the corresponding emotion as predicted by appraisal theories. Explicit and implicit emotional responses were examined. We focused on implicit unfairness and its effect on anger. The results show that subliminal activation of implicit unfairness affected implicit anger responses but not explicit anger feelings . The non-conscious effect of implicit unfairness was specific to anger, as no effect on sadness, fear, and guilt was found.
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  • Emotion Experience.Nico Frijda - 2005 - Cognition and Emotion 19 (4):473-497.
  • Cognition and Emotionover Twenty-Five Years.Keith Oatley, W. Gerrod Parrott, Craig Smith & Fraser Watts - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (8):1341-1348.
  • Can Cognitive Methods Be Used to Study the Unique Aspect of Emotion: An Appraisal Theorist's Answer.Agnes Moors - 2007 - Cognition and Emotion 21 (6):1238-1269.
  • Interactional Appraisal Models for the Anger Appraisals of Threatened Self-Esteem, Other-Blame, and Frustration.Peter Kuppens & Iven Van Mechelen - 2007 - Cognition and Emotion 21 (1):56-77.