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Jeffrey Moriarty (2005). Do CEOs Get Paid Too Much?

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  1.  6
    Executive Compensation and Employee Remuneration: The Flexible Principles of Justice in Pay.Michel Magnan & Dominic Martin - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics:1-17.
    This paper investigates a series of normative principles that are used to justify different aspects of executive compensation within business firms, as well as the remuneration of lower-ranking employees. We look at how businesses perform pay benchmarking; employees’ engagement, fidelity and loyalty ; and the acceptability of what we call both-ends-dipping, that is, receiving both ex ante and ex post benefits for the same work. We make two observations. First, either different or incoherent principles are used to justify the pay (...)
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  2.  19
    Egalitarianism and Executive Compensation: A Relational Argument.Pierre-Yves Néron - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (1):171-184.
    What, if anything, is wrong with high executive compensation? Is the common “lay reaction” of indignation and moral outrage justified? In this paper, my main goal is to articulate in a more systematic and philosophical manner the egalitarian responses to these questions. In order to do so, I suggest that we take some insights from recent debates on two versions of egalitarianism: a distributive one, according to which no one should be worse off than others because of unfair distributions of (...)
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  3.  15
    Using Inside Job to Teach Business Ethics.Ernest N. Biktimirov & Don Cyr - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):209-219.
    This article recommends the film Inside Job as an effective teaching tool for illustrating the ethical issues that surrounded the global financial crisis of 2008 and the subsequent economic downturn. The study discusses issues such as the revolving door, conflicts of interest, fiduciary duty, executive compensation, and financial regulation. The presentation of each ethical issue comprises suggested questions, background information, and guides to specific sections of the film. An overview of the film is provided as well.
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  4.  13
    Managing the Risks of Corporate Political Donations: A Utilitarian Perspective.Shane Leong, James Hazelton & Cynthia Townley - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (2):429-445.
    This paper applies a utilitarian analysis to corporate political donations. Unlike the more common rights-based analyses, it is argued that the optimal policy is the one that best satisfies society’s rational preferences concerning donor influence, adequate financing, donor pressure and the cost of maintaining and enforcing the democratic system. This analysis suggests that a ban is best if it would be generally observed and sufficient financing from other sources is available, otherwise a donation cap is a better option. Further, lobbyists (...)
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  5.  47
    Vice or Virtue? The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on Executive Compensation.Ye Cai, Hoje Jo & Carrie Pan - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (2):159-173.
    We empirically examine the impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on CEO compensation using a large sample of the US firms from 1996 to 2010. We develop and test two hypotheses, the overinvestment hypothesis based on agency theory and the conflict–resolution hypothesis based on stakeholder theory. We find that the lag of CSR adversely affects both total compensation and cash compensation, after controlling for various firm and board characteristics. Our estimates show that an interquartile increase in CSR is followed by (...)
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  6.  56
    The Structure of a Rawlsian Theory of Just Work.Lars Lindblom - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (4):577-599.
    This article outlines the structure of a Rawlsian theory of justice in the employment relationship. A focus on this theory is motivated by the role it plays in debates in business ethics. The Rawlsian theory answers three central questions about justice and the workplace. What is the relationship between social justice and justice at work? How should we conceive of the problem of justice in the economic sphere? And, what is justice in the workplace? To see fully what demands justice (...)
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  7.  23
    Are Stock Options Grants to CEOs of Stagnant Firms Fair and Justified?Kiridaran Kanagaretnam, Gerald J. Lobo & Emad Mohammad - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (1):137-155.
    Prior research has examined several ethical questions related to executive compensation. The issues that have received most attention are whether executives' pay is fair and justified by performance. Since more recent studies show that stock options grants constitute the single largest component in executive compensation, we examine the relations of these grants to economic determinants and corporate governance for firms in the stagnant stage of their lifecycle. We find that, on average, stock options grants comprise a significant portion of annual (...)
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  8.  20
    Executive Compensation.Marjorie Chan - 2008 - Business and Society Review 113 (1):129-161.
  9.  80
    Moral Luck and Business Ethics.Christopher Michaelson - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (4):773-787.
    Moral luck – which seems to appear when circumstances beyond a person’s control influence our moral attributions of praise and blame – is troubling in that modern moral theory has supposed morality to be immune to luck. In business, moral luck commonly influences our moral judgments, many of which have economic consequences that cannot be reversed. The possibility that the chance intervention of luck could influence the way in which we assign moral accountability in business ethics is unsettling. This paper (...)
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  10.  31
    The Shadow of Macintyre's Manager in the Kingdom of Conscience Constrained.James A. H. S. Hine - 2007 - Business Ethics 16 (4):358–371.
    This article addresses the issue of moral compunction among a sample of senior managers set against the background of their routine organizational participation. In considering what factors influence their moral sensibilities these managers were interviewed using an approach designed to elicit their perceptions concerning both the ethical and commercially imperative dimensions of their working lives. The qualitative data resulting from this inquiry, while tentative, indicates the primacy of the normative appeal of shareholder value, conditioned by the exigencies of engagement in (...)
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  11.  5
    The Shadow of MacIntyre's Manager in the Kingdom of Conscience Constrained.James A. H. S. Hine - 2007 - Business Ethics: A European Review 16 (4):358-371.
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  12.  43
    Does 'Best Practice' in Setting Executive Pay in the UK Encourage 'Good' Behaviour?Ruth Bender & Lance Moir - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 67 (1):75 - 91.
    We examine how UK listed companies set executive pay, reviewing the implications of following best practice in corporate governance and examining how this can conflict with what shareholders and other stakeholders might perceive as good behaviour. We do this by considering current governance regulation in the light of interviews with protagonists in the debate, setting out the dilemmas faced by remuneration-setters, and showing how the processes they follow can lead to ethical conflicts.Current ‘best’ practice governing executive pay includes the use (...)
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  13.  1
    Does ‘Best Practice’ in Setting Executive Pay in the UK Encourage ‘Good’ Behaviour?Ruth Bender & Lance Moir - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 67 (1):75-91.
    We examine how UK listed companies set executive pay, reviewing the implications of following best practice in corporate governance and examining how this can conflict with what shareholders and other stakeholders might perceive as good behaviour. We do this by considering current governance regulation in the light of interviews with protagonists in the debate, setting out the dilemmas faced by remuneration-setters, and showing how the processes they follow can lead to ethical conflicts. Current 'best' practice governing executive pay includes the (...)
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