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  1. Counting Species: Biopower and the Global Biodiversity Census.R. Youatt - 2008 - Environmental Values 17 (3):393-417.
    Biopolitical analyses of census -taking usually focus on human censuses and consider how human experience is shaped by the practice. Instead, this article looks at the proposed global biodiversity census, which aims to take inventory of every species on earth as a response to anthropogenic species extinction. I suggest that it is possible to extend and modify Foucault's concept of biopower to consider contemporary human-nonhuman interactions. Specifically, I argue that an ecologically-extended version of biopower offers a useful way to conceptualise (...)
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  • Zoopolis: Challenging Our Conceptualisation of Political Sovereignty Through Animal Sovereignties.Dinesh Joseph Wadiwel - 2013 - Dialogue 52 (4):1-10.
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  • “Like One Who is Bringing His Own Hide to Market”: Marx, Irigaray, Derrida and Animal Commodification.Dinesh Joseph Wadiwel - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (2):65-82.
    This paper explores the commodification of animals, beginning with Marx’s description of how value arises within a system of exchange. Drawing from Irigaray, I observe that value in animals is both arrived at through the use value of the animal as a commodity for human consumption and as a form of currency which serves a function in reproducing the value of the “human” itself. Extending this further, I reflect on Derrida’s discussion of the metaphor as a way to understand the (...)
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  • Animals on Drugs: Understanding the Role of Pharmaceutical Companies in the Animal-Industrial Complex. [REVIEW]Richard Twine - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (4):505-514.
    In this paper I revisit previous critiques that I have made of much, though by no means all, bioethical discourse. These pertain to faithfulness to dualistic ontology, a taken-for-granted normative anthropocentrism, and the exclusion of a consideration of how political economy shapes the conditions for bioethical discourse (Twine Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8(3):285-295, 2005; International Journal of Sociology of Agriculture and Food 16(3):1-18, 2007, 2010). Part of my argument around bioethical dualist ontology is to critique the assumption of a (...)
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  • “Foucault and Critical Animal Studies: Genealogies of Agricultural Power”.Chloë Taylor - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (6):539-551.
    Michel Foucault is well known as a theorist of power who provided forceful critiques of institutions of confinement such as the psychiatric asylum and the prison. Although the invention of factory farms and industrial slaughterhouses, like prisons and psychiatric hospitals, can be considered emblematic moments in a history of modernity, and although the modern farm is an institution of confinement comparable to the prison, Foucault never addressed these institutions, the politics of animal agriculture, or power relationships between humans and other (...)
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  • Choosing and Rejecting Cattle and Sheep: Changing Discourses and Practices of (de)Selection in Pedigree Livestock Breeding. [REVIEW]Lewis Holloway, Carol Morris, Ben Gilna & David Gibbs - 2011 - Agriculture and Human Values 28 (4):533-547.
    This paper examines the discourses and practices of pedigree livestock breeding, focusing on beef cattle and sheep in the UK, concentrating on an under-examined aspect of this—the deselection and rejection of some animals from future breeding populations. In the context of exploring how animals are valued and represented in different ways in relation to particular agricultural knowledge-practices, it focuses on deselecting particular animals from breeding populations, drawing attention to shifts in such knowledge-practices related to the emergence of “genetic” techniques in (...)
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