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  1. Moral Values: Situationally Defined Individual Differences.Elizabeth D. Scott - 2000 - Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (2):497-521.
    This article suggests that there are individual differences in how people define important moral values, and that these differences are made manifest in differences in the situations. It identifies five dimensions along which individuals can differ in their understandings of values: 1) value category (where the value lies in the hierarchy), 2) agent (how voluntary the action is and whether it is morally required of the agent), 3) object (how close the self is to the object of the action; whether (...)
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  • Lying: The Impact of Decision Context.William T. Ross & Diana C. Robertson - 2000 - Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (2):409-440.
    This study tests the usefulness of a person-situation interactionist framework in examining the willingness of a salesperson to lie to get an order. Using a survey of 389 salespersons, our results demonstrate that organizational relationships influence willingness to lie. Specifically, salespersons are less willing to lie to their own company than to their customer, than to a channel partner, and finally,than to a competitor firm. Furthermore, respondents from firms with a clear and positive ethical climate are less willing to lie. (...)
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  • The Impact of Ethical Ideologies, Moral Intensity, and Social Context on Sales-Based Ethical Reasoning.Sean R. Valentine & Connie R. Bateman - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (1):155-168.
    Previous research indicates that ethical ideologies, issue-contingencies, and social context can impact ethical reasoning in different business situations. However, the manner in which these constructs work together to shape different steps of the ethical decision-making process is not always clear. The purpose of this study was to address these issues by exploring the influence of idealism and relativism, perceived moral intensity in a decision-making situation, and social context on the recognition of an ethical issue and ethical intention. Utilizing a sales-based (...)
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  • The Legacy Motive: A Catalyst for Sustainable Decision Making in Organizations.Matthew Fox, Leigh Plunkett Tost & Kimberly A. Wade-Benzoni - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (2):153-185.
    In this article, we review and build on intergenerational and behavioral ethics research to consider how the motive to build a lasting legacy can impact ethical behavior in intergenerational decision making. We discuss how people can utilize their relationships toorganizations to craft their legacies. Further, we elucidate how the legacy motive can enhance business ethics, incorporating theory and empirical findings from research on intergenerational decision making, generativity, and terror management theory to develop the legacy construct and to outline the psychological (...)
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  • The Effect of Moral Intensity on Ethical Judgment.Joan Marie McMahon & Robert J. Harvey - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 72 (4):335-357.
    Following an extensive review of the moral intensity literature, this article reports the findings of two studies (one between-subjects, the other within-subject) that examined the effect of manipulated and perceived moral intensity on ethical judgment. In the between-subjects study participants judged actions taken in manipulated high moral intensity scenarios to be more unethical than the same actions taken in manipulated low moral intensity scenarios. Findings were mixed for the effect of perceived moral intensity. Both probable magnitude of consequences (a factor (...)
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  • Accounting for Proscriptive and Prescriptive Morality in the Workplace: The Double-Edged Sword Effect of Mood on Managerial Ethical Decision Making.Laura J. Noval & Günter K. Stahl - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 142 (3):589-602.
    This article provides a conceptual framework for studying the influence of mood on managerial ethical decision making. We draw on mood-congruency theory and the affect infusion model to propose that mood influences managerial ethical decision making through deliberate and conscious assessments of the moral intensity of an ethical issue. By accounting for proscriptive and prescriptive morality—i.e., harmful and prosocial behavior, respectively—we demonstrate that positive and negative mood may have asymmetrical and paradoxical effects on ethical decision making. Specifically, our analysis suggests (...)
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  • The Joint Moderating Impact of Moral Intensity and Moral Judgment on Consumer’s Use Intention of Pirated Software.Mei-Fang Chen, Ching-Ti Pan & Ming-Chuan Pan - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (3):361 - 373.
    Moral issues have been included in the studies of consumer misbehavior research, but little is known about the joint moderating effect of moral intensity and moral judgment on the consumer’s use intention of pirated software. This study aims to understand the consumer’s use intention of pirated software in Taiwan based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) proposed by Ajzen (Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 50, 179, 1991). In addition, moral intensity and moral judgment are adopted as a joint (...)
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  • Using Ibsen in Business Ethics.Johannes Brinkmann - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (S1):11 - 24.
    To celebrate the 100th anniversary of Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen's death, during 2006 quite a number of cultural events were launched (cf. http://www.ibsen.net/). The article suggests celebrating Ibsen as a potentially useful resource for business ethics teaching. Departing from a short presentation of Ibsen's plays An enemy of the people and A doll's house the main focus of this paper is on two selected scenes from the latter piece -both as raw material for developing scenarios for moral maturity assessment (one (...)
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  • Anger Strays, Fear Refrains: The Differential Effect of Negative Emotions on Consumers’ Ethical Judgments.Jatinder J. Singh, Nitika Garg, Rahul Govind & Scott J. Vitell - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (1):235-248.
    Although various factors have been studied for their influence on consumers’ ethical judgments, the role of incidental emotions has received relatively less attention. Recent research in consumer behavior has focused on studying the effect of specific incidental emotions on various aspects of consumer decision making. This paper investigates the effect of two negative, incidental emotional states of anger and fear on ethical judgment in a consumer context using a passive unethical behavior scenario. The paper presents two experimental studies. Study 1 (...)
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  • Using the PET Assessment Instrument to Help Students Identify Factors That Could Impede Moral Behavior.Debra R. Comer & Gina Vega - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):129 - 145.
    We present an instrument developed to explain to students the concept of the personal ethical threshold (PET). The PET represents an individual’s susceptibility to situational pressure in his or her organization that makes moral behavior more personally difficult. Further, the PET varies according to the moral intensity of the issue at hand, such that individuals are less vulnerable to situational pressure for issues of high moral intensity, i.e., those with greater consequences for others. A higher PET reflects an individual’s greater (...)
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  • Ethical Sensitivity for Organizational Communication Issues: Examining Individual and Organizational Differences.Tammy Swenson-Lepper - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (3):205-231.
    . This descriptive study discusses cognitive mapping as a technique for analyzing ethical sensitivity, examines whether the method allows comparisons between people, compares the ethical sensitivity levels of participants from three organizations, examines which indicators of ethical sensitivity are most salient to members of specific organizations, and examines whether education level or organizational membership is the best predictor of an individual’s ethical sensitivity level. Subjects from three organizations read background information, listened to two audiotaped scenarios containing multiple ethical issues related (...)
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  • Observers' Impressions of Unethical Persons and Whistleblowers.Wayne H. Decker & Thomas J. Calo - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 76 (3):309 - 318.
    Since there have been many recent occurrences of alleged wrongdoing by business persons and other professionals, it seems additional ethics research is needed to obtain knowledge that will impact real-world behavior. An empirical study assessed business students’ impressions of hypothetical wrongdoers and whistleblowers. To some extent, impressions of an unethical executive and a whistleblower were influenced by the same variables and in opposite directions. Female respondents judged the unethical executive less favorably and the whistleblower more favorably than did males. The (...)
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  • The Role of Moral Intensity and Moral Philosophy in Ethical Decision Making: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of China and the European Union.Scott J. Vitell & Abhijit Patwardhan - 2008 - Business Ethics 17 (2):196–209.
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  • Deception in Business Networks: Is It Easier to Lie Online?Jeanne M. Logsdon & Karen D. W. Patterson - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (S4):537 - 549.
    This article synthesizes research presented in several models of unethical behavior to develop propositions about the factors that facilitate and mitigate deception in online business communications. The work expands the social network perspective to incorporate the medium of communication as a significant influence on deception. We go beyond existing models by developing seven propositions that identify how social network and issue moral intensity characteristics influence the probability of deception in online business communication in comparison to traditional communication channels. Remedies to (...)
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  • Individual and Organizational Predictors of the Ethicality of Graduate Students’ Responses to Research Integrity Issues.Philip J. Langlais & Blake J. Bent - 2014 - Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (4):897-921.
    The development of effective means to enhance research integrity by universities requires baseline measures of individual, programmatic, and institutional factors known to contribute to ethical decision making and behavior. In the present study, master’s thesis and Ph.D. students in the fields of biological, health and social sciences at a research extensive university completed a field appropriate measure of research ethical decision making and rated the seriousness of the research issue and importance for implementing the selection response. In addition they were (...)
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  • Ethical Decision Making: Special or No Different? [REVIEW]Dawn R. Elm & Tara J. Radin - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 107 (3):313-329.
    Theories of ethical decision making assume it is a process that is special, or different in some regard, from typical individual decision making. Empirical results of the most widely known theories in the field of business ethics contain numerous inconsistencies and contradictions. In an attempt to assess why we continue to lack understanding of how individuals make ethical decisions at work, an inductive study of ethical decision making was conducted. The results of this preliminary study suggest that ethical decision making (...)
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  • Ethical Decision Making and the Employed Lawyer.Sally Gunz & Hugh Gunz - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (4):927-944.
    This article addresses one of the more disturbing questions raised by the major financial failures of the recent past; namely, how it could be that professionals, highly trained both in ethics and technical disciplines, should apparently collude with management in corporate misbehaviour. The article builds on evidence suggesting that professionals in employment contexts find ways of adapting in order to minimise perceived or actual conflict between their professional and organizational obligations and that this, in turn, may affect the way in (...)
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  • Consideration of the Role of Guanxi in the Ethical Judgments of Chinese Managers.Cynthia Ho & Kylie A. Redfern - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (2):207 - 221.
    The importance of personal connections and relationships, or guanxi when doing business with the Chinese is widely acknowledged amongst Western academics and business managers alike. However, aspects of guanxi-rehted behaviours in the workplace are often misunderstood by Westerners with some going so far as to equate guanxi with forms of corruption. This study extends earlier study of Tan and Snell: 2002, Journal of Business Ethics 41 (December), 361-384) in its investigation of the underlying modes of moral reasoning in ethical decisions (...)
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  • Design and Validation of a Novel New Instrument for Measuring the Effect of Moral Intensity on Accountants' Propensity to Manage Earnings.Jeanette Ng, Gregory P. White, Alina Lee & Andreas Moneta - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (3):367 - 387.
    The goal of this study was to construct a valid new instrument to measure the effect of moral intensity on managers' propensity to manage earnings. More specifically, this study is a pilot study of the impact of moral intensity on financial accountants' propensity to manage earnings. The instrument, once validated, will be used in a full-study of managers in the hotel industry. Different ethical scenarios were presented to respondents in the survey; each ethical scenario was designed in both high or (...)
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  • What Makes Customers Discontent with Service Providers? An Empirical Analysis of Complaint Handling in Information and Communication Technology Services.C. Y. Chan Hubert & E. W. T. Ngai - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (S1):73 - 110.
    The effectiveness of complaint handling and service recovery policies in customer retention has been the focus of both scholars and service organizations. In the past decade, Justice Theory has provided the basis of the dominant theoretical framework for complaint management and service recovery. However, it does not explicitly address unfair trade practices, which constitute an ethical issue. Favorable outcomes in complaint handling may not be able to restore the reputation of a company and the potential harm perceived by consumers. Using (...)
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  • The Ethics of Meaningful Work: Types and Magnitude of Job-Related Harm and the Ethical Decision-Making Process.Douglas R. May, Cuifang Li, Jennifer Mencl & Ching-Chu Huang - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 121 (4):651-669.
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  • Psychometric Properties of the Reidenbach–Robin Multidimensional Ethics Scale.Joan Marie McMahon & Robert J. Harvey - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 72 (1):27-39.
    The factor structure of the Multidimensional Ethics Scale (MES; Reidenbach and Robin: 1988, Journal of Business Ethics 7, 871–879; 1990, Journal of Business Ethics 9, 639–653) was examined for the 8-item short form (N = 328) and the original 30-item pool (N = 260). The objectives of the study were: to verify the dimensionality of the MES; to increase the amount of true cross-scenario variance through the use of 18 scenarios varying in moral intensity (Jones: 1991, Academy of Management Review (...)
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  • An Investigation Into Unethical Behavior Intentions Among Undergraduate Students: A Malaysian Study. [REVIEW]Joyce K. H. Nga & Evelyn W. S. Lum - 2013 - Journal of Academic Ethics 11 (1):45-71.
    The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of the dimensions of the theory of planned behavior, gender and course majors on unethical behavior intentions among Generation Y undergraduates. The sample of this study comprises 245 undergraduates from a private higher education institution (PHEI) in Malaysia. The instrument of this study is developed based on concepts developed from extant literature. Reliability and validity is accessed using Cronbach’s Alpha and Exploratory Factor Analysis respectively. Social desirability bias was monitored utilizing (...)
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  • Workplace Romance 2.0: Developing a Communication Ethics Model to Address Potential Sexual Harassment From Inappropriate Social Media Contacts Between Coworkers. [REVIEW]Lisa A. Mainiero & Kevin J. Jones - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (2):367-379.
    This article examines ethical implications from workplace romances that may subsequently turn into sexual harassment through the use of social media technologies, such as YouTube, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, text messaging, IMing, and other forms of digital communication between office colleagues. We examine common ethical models such as Jones (Acad Manag Rev 16:366–395, 1991) issue-contingent decision-making model, Rest’s (Moral development: Advances in research and theory, 1986) Stages of Ethical Decision-Making model, and Pierce and Aguinis’s (J Org Behav 26(6):727–732,2005) review of workplace (...)
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  • Ethical Consumer Decision‐Making: The Role of Need for Cognition and Affective Responses.Omneya Mokhtar Yacout & Scott Vitell - 2018 - Business Ethics: A European Review 27 (2):178-194.
    Most of the academic research in the field of consumer ethics has focused on the cognitive antecedents and processes of unethical consumer behavior. However, the specific roles of discrete emotions such as fear have not yet been investigated thoroughly. This research examines the role of the need for cognition, the three affective responses—fear, power, and excitement—and perceived issue importance on moral intensity, ethical perceptions, and ethical intentions for four types of unethical consumer behaviors. A sample of consumers from the two (...)
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  • Dishonesty in the Classroom: The Effect of Cognitive Dissonance and the Mitigating Influence of Religious Commitment. [REVIEW]Gordon F. Woodbine & Vimala Amirthalingam - 2013 - Journal of Academic Ethics 11 (2):139-155.
    A controlled experiment was conducted with a cohort of graduate accounting students, which involved a mild form of deception during a class ethics quiz. One of the answers to a difficult question was inadvertently revealed by a visiting scholar, which allowed students an opportunity to use the answer in order to maximise test scores and qualify for a reward. Despite an attempt to sensitize students prior to the test to the importance of moral codes of conduct, a high incidence of (...)
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  • Relative Importance Measurement of the Moral Intensity Dimensions.John Tsalikis, Bruce Seaton & Philip Shepherd - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (3):613-626.
    The relative importance of the Jones’ [Jones, T. M.: 1991, Academy of Management Review 16(2), 366–395] six components of moral intensity was measured using a conjoint experimental design. The most important components influencing ethical perceptions were: probability of effect, magnitude of consequences, and temporal immediacy. Contrary to previous research, overall social consensus was not an important factor. However, consumers exhibit distinctly different patterns in ethical evaluation, and for approximately 15% of respondents social consensus was the most important dimension.
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  • Using the Analytical Hierarchy Process (Ahp) to Construct a Measure of the Magnitude of Consequences Component of Moral Intensity.Eric W. Stein & Norita Ahmad - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):391 - 407.
    The purpose of this work is to elaborate an empirically grounded mathematical model of the magnitude of consequences component of “moral intensity” (Jones, Academy of Management Review 16 (2),366, 1991) that can be used to evaluate different ethical situations. The model is built using the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) (Saaty, The Analytic Hierarchy Process , 1980) and empirical data from the legal profession. One contribution of our work is that it illustrates how AHP can be applied in the field of (...)
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  • The Interaction of Learning Styles and Teaching Methodologies in Accounting Ethical Instruction.Conor O'Leary & Jenny Stewart - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (2):225-241.
    Ethical instruction is critical for trainee accountants. Various teaching methods, both active and passive, are normally utilised when teaching accounting ethics. However, students’ learning styles are rarely assessed. This study evaluates the learning styles of accounting students and assesses the interaction of teaching methods and learning styles in an ethics instruction environment. The ethical attitudes and preferred learning styles of a cohort (137) of final year accounting students were evaluated pre-instruction. They were then subject to three different teaching methods while (...)
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  • What Would I Do? Civilians' Ethical Decision Making in Response to Military Dilemmas.Ann-Renée Blais & Megan M. Thompson - 2013 - Ethics and Behavior 23 (3):237-249.
    This research explored the ethical decision-making process of civilians in response to real-world military dilemmas. Results revealed the complexity of these dilemmas, with about equal proportions of civilians choosing each of two response options. The moral intensity dimension of social consensus significantly predicted moral judgment in both dilemmas, whereas that of magnitude of consequences did so in only one dilemma, partially supporting our hypothesis. Both dimensions were significant predictors of moral intent in both dilemmas as was moral judgment, also supporting (...)
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  • Military Ethical Decision Making: The Effects of Option Choice and Perspective Taking on Moral Decision-Making Processes and Intentions.Megan M. Thompson, Tonya Hendriks & Ann-Renée Blais - 2018 - Ethics and Behavior 28 (7):578-596.
    We investigated the ethical decision-making processes and intentions of 151 military personnel responding to 1 of 2 ethical scenarios drawn from the deployment experiences of military commanders. For each scenario, option choice and perspective affected decision-making processes. Differences were also found between the 2 scenarios. Results add to the emerging literature concerning operational ethical conflicts and highlight the complexity and challenge that often accompanies operational ethics.
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  • The Impact of Moral Intensity and Desire for Control on Scaling Decisions in Social Entrepreneurship.Brett R. Smith, Geoffrey M. Kistruck & Benedetto Cannatelli - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (4):677-689.
    While research has focused on why certain entrepreneurs elect to create innovative solutions to social problems, very little is known about why some social entrepreneurs choose to scale their solutions while others do not. Research on scaling has generally focused on organizational characteristics often overlooking factors at the individual level that may affect scaling decisions. Drawing on the multidimensional construct of moral intensity, we propose a theoretical model of ethical decision making to explain why a social entrepreneur’s perception of moral (...)
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  • Villains, Victims, and Verisimilitudes: An Exploratory Study of Unethical Corporate Values, Bullying Experiences, Psychopathy, and Selling Professionals’ Ethical Reasoning.Sean Valentine, Gary Fleischman & Lynn Godkin - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (1):135-154.
    This study assesses the relationships among unethical corporate values, bullying experiences, psychopathy, and selling professionals’ ethical evaluations of bullying. Information was collected from national/regional samples of selling professionals. Results indicated that unethical values, bullying, and psychopathy were positively interrelated. Psychopathy and unethical values were negatively associated with moral intensity, while moral intensity was positively related to ethical issue importance. Psychopathy and unethical values were negatively related to issue importance, and issue importance and moral intensity were positively related to ethical judgment. (...)
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  • Using the PET Assessment Instrument to Help Students Identify Factors That Could Impede Moral Behavior.Debra R. Comer & Gina Vega - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):129-145.
    We present an instrument developed to explain to students the concept of the personal ethical threshold. The PET represents an individual's susceptibility to situational pressure in his or her organization that makes moral behavior more personally difficult. Further, the PET varies according to the moral intensity of the issue at hand, such that individuals are less vulnerable to situational pressure for issues of high moral intensity, i.e., those with greater consequences for others. A higher PET reflects an individual's greater likelihood (...)
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  • Is Intuition Associated with Ethical Decision-Making?Jen-Sheng Liao, Yen-Yi Chung & Wen-Cheng Huang - 2018 - Hts Theological Studies 74 (1).
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  • Moral Intensity, Issue Characteristics, and Ethical Issue Recognition in Sales Situations.Evelyne Rousselet, Bérangère Brial, Romain Cadario & Amina Béji-Bécheur - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-17.
    Researchers have considered individual and organizational factors of ethical decision making. However, they have little interest in situational factors :101–125, 2013) which is surprising given the many situations sales persons face. We address this issue using two pilot qualitative studies successively and a 2 by 2 within-subject experiment with sales scenarios. Qualitative and quantitative data are obtained from front-line employees of the main French retail banks that serve low-income customers. We show that the recognition of an ethical issue differs depending (...)
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  • The Antecedents of Music Piracy Attitudes and Intentions.Jyh-Shen Chiou, Chien-yi Huang & Hsin-hui Lee - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 57 (2):161-174.
    Piracy is the greatest threat facing the music industry worldwide today. This study developed and empirically tested a model examining the antecedents of consumer attitude and behavioral intention toward music piracy behavior. Two types of music piracy behavior, unauthorized duplication/download and pirated music product purchasing, were examined. Based on a field survey in Taiwan, the results showed that attributive satisfaction, perceived prosecution risk, magnitude of consequence, and social consensus are very important in influencing customers attitude and behavioral intention toward two (...)
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  • Consumers' Evaluation of Unethical Marketing Behaviors: The Role of Customer Commitment. [REVIEW]Rhea Ingram, Steven J. Skinner & Valerie A. Taylor - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 62 (3):237 - 252.
    While there is a significant amount of research investigating managerial ethical judgments, a limited amount examines consumer judgments of unethical corporate behavior and its impact on the marketplace. This study examines how consumers’ commitment to a company impacts not only their ethical judgment of corporate behavior but also the outcomes of that judgment. The authors test hypotheses with data from 334 consumers and find that consumers’ level of commitment attenuates the level of perceived fairness. More specifically, highly committed consumers may (...)
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  • Ethical Antecedents of Cheating Intentions: Evidence of Mediation. [REVIEW]Jeremy J. Sierra & Michael R. Hyman - 2008 - Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (1):51--66.
    Although the pedagogy literature indicates significant relationships between cheating intentions and both personal and situational factors, no published research has examined the joint effect of personal moral philosophy and perceived moral intensity components on students’ cheating intentions. Hence, a structural equation model that relates magnitude of consequences, relativism, and idealism to willingness to cheat, is developed and tested. Using data from undergraduate business students, the empirical results provide insight into these relationships and evidence of mediation for magnitude of consequences on (...)
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  • Design and Validation of a Novel New Instrument for Measuring the Effect of Moral Intensity on Accountants’ Propensity to Manage Earnings.Jeanette Ng, Gregory P. White, Alina Lee & Andreas Moneta - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (3):367-387.
    The goal of this study was to construct a valid new instrument to measure the effect of moral intensity on managers' propensity to manage earnings. More specifically, this study is a pilot study of the impact of moral intensity on financial accountants' propensity to manage earnings. The instrument, once validated, will be used in a full-study of managers in the hotel industry. Different ethical scenarios were presented to respondents in the survey; each ethical scenario was designed in both high or (...)
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  • Ethical Decision–Making: A Multidimensional Construct.Danielle S. Beu, M. Ronald Buckley & Michael G. Harvey - 2003 - Business Ethics 12 (1):88–107.
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  • Effects of the Use of the Availability Heuristic on Ethical Decision-Making in Organizations.Sefa Hayibor & David M. Wasieleski - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (S1):151 - 165.
    Recent corporate scandals across various industries have led to an increased focus on research in business ethics, particularly on understanding ethical decision-making. This increased interest is due largely to managers' desire to reduce the incidence of unwanted behaviors in the workplace. This article examines one major moderator of the ethical decision-making process - moral intensity. In particular, we explore the potential influence of a particular cognitive heuristic - the availability heuristic -on perceptions of moral intensity. It is our contention that (...)
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  • Moral Intensity as a Predictor of Social Responsibility.Eugene D. Jaffe & Hanoch Pasternak - 2006 - Business Ethics 15 (1):53–63.
  • Using the Analytical Hierarchy Process to Construct a Measure of the Magnitude of Consequences Component of Moral Intensity.Eric W. Stein & Norita Ahmad - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):391-407.
    The purpose of this work is to elaborate an empirically grounded mathematical model of the magnitude of consequences component of "moral intensity", 366, 1991) that can be used to evaluate different ethical situations. The model is built using the analytical hierarchy process and empirical data from the legal profession. One contribution of our work is that it illustrates how AHP can be applied in the field of ethics. Following a review of the literature, we discuss the development of the model. (...)
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  • The Joint Moderating Impact of Moral Intensity and Moral Judgment on Consumer’s Use Intention of Pirated Software.Mei-Fang Chen, Ching-Ti Pan & Ming-Chuan Pan - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (3):361-373.
    Moral issues have been included in the studies of consumer misbehavior research, but little is known about the joint moderating effect of moral intensity and moral judgment on the consumer's use intention of pirated software. This study aims to understand the consumer's use intention of pirated software in Taiwan based on the theory of planned behavior proposed by Ajzen. In addition, moral intensity and moral judgment are adopted as a joint moderator to examine their combined influence on the proposed research (...)
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  • Consumers’ Evaluation of Unethical Marketing Behaviors: The Role of Customer Commitment.Rhea Ingram, Steven J. Skinner & Valerie A. Taylor - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 62 (3):237-252.
    While there is a significant amount of research investigating managerial ethical judgments, a limited amount examines consumer judgments of unethical corporate behavior and its impact on the marketplace. This study examines how consumers' commitment to a company impacts not only their ethical judgment of corporate behavior but also the outcomes of that judgment. The authors test hypotheses with data from 334 consumers and find that consumers' level of commitment attenuates the level of perceived fairness. More specifically, highly committed consumers may (...)
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  • Observers’ Impressions of Unethical Persons and Whistleblowers.Wayne H. Decker & Thomas J. Calo - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 76 (3):309-318.
    Since there have been many recent occurrences of alleged wrongdoing by business persons and other professionals, it seems additional ethics research is needed to obtain knowledge that will impact real-world behavior. An empirical study assessed business students' impressions of hypothetical wrongdoers and whistleblowers. To some extent, impressions of an unethical executive and a whistleblower were influenced by the same variables and in opposite directions. Female respondents judged the unethical executive less favorably and the whistleblower more favorably than did males. The (...)
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  • Organizational Role and Environmental Uncertainty as Influences on Ethical Work Climate in Military Units.James Weber & Virginia W. Gerde - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 100 (4):595 - 612.
    In addition to a person's character and training, the organization's ethical work climate (EWC) can assess how the organization influences an individual's ethical decision-making process by examining the individuals' perception of "what is the right thing to do" in a particular organizational environment. Relatively little research has explored which EWCs dominate military units and the impact of organizational role and environmental uncertainty on individuals in the military and their ethical decision making. In this study, we examined the predominant EWCs among (...)
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  • Professionals' Tax Liability Assessments and Ethical Evaluations in an Equitable Relief Innocent Spouse Case.Gary Fleischman & Sean Valentine - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 42 (1):27-44.
    This study used a national sample of professionals and a questionnaire containing equitable relief vignettes to explore whether the new equitable relief subset of the revised innocent spouse rules is helpful to the IRS when making relief decisions. The study also addressed the ethical and gender issues associated with equitable relief innocent spouse cases. The results suggested that several equitable relief factors are useful as discriminators in the relief decision. The results also demonstrated that the recognition of an ethical issue (...)
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  • Stakeholder Perceptions of Offshoring and Outsourcing: The Role of Embedded Issues. [REVIEW]Christopher J. Robertson, Anna Lamin & Grigorios Livanis - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (2):167 - 189.
    We contribute to the study of offshoring and outsourcing by examining how stakeholders' ethical evaluations of these decisions are influenced by both their roles and the issues embedded within the decisions. Although offshoring and outsourcing have been studied from a transactional perspective, the moral issues embedded within these decisions can profoundly affect how the organization is perceived by outside stakeholders. First, we contend that investors use different moral paradigms compared with consumer stakeholders, as a result the stakeholder role an individual (...)
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