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  1. Libertarian Natural Rights.Siegfried van Duffel - 2004 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 16 (4):353-375.
    Non-consequentialist libertarianism usually revolves around the claim that there are only “negative,” not “positive,” rights. Libertarian nega- tive-rights theories are so patently problematic, though, that it seems that there is a more fundamental notion at work. Some libertarians think this basic idea is freedom or liberty; others, that it is self-ownership. Neither approach is satis- factory.
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  • No Gods, No Masters, No Coders? The Future of Sovereignty in a Blockchain World.Sarah Manski & Ben Manski - 2018 - Law and Critique 29 (2):151-162.
    The building of the blockchain is predicted to harken the end of the contemporary sovereign order. Some go further to claim that as a powerful decentering technology, blockchain contests the continued functioning of world capitalism. Are such claims merited? In this paper we consider sovereignty and blockchain technology theoretically, posing possible futures for sovereignty in a blockchain world. These possibilities include various forms of individual, popular, technological, corporate, and techno-totalitarian state sovereignty. We identify seven structural tendencies of blockchain technology and (...)
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  • Popular Sovereignty Facing the Deep State. The Rule of Recognition and the Powers of the People.Ludvig Beckman - 2019 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-23.
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  • Owning Land Versus Governing a Land: Property, Sovereignty, and Nationalism: Sam Fleischacker.Sam Fleischacker - 2013 - Social Philosophy and Policy 30 (1-2):373-403.
    This essay attempts to clarify the distinction between property and sovereignty, and to bring out the importance of that distinction to a liberal nationalism. Beginning with common intuitions about what distinguishes our rights to our possessions from the state's rightful governance over us, it proceeds to explore some historical sources of these intuitions, and the importance of a sharp distinction between ownership and governance to the rise of liberalism. From here, the essay moves into an exploration of group ownership, and (...)
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