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The Life of David Hume

Philosophy 31 (116):80-82 (1956)

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  1. The Dual Aspects Theory of Truth.Benjamin Jarvis - 2012 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 42 (3-4):209-233.
    Consider the following 'principles':2(Norm of Belief Schema) Necessarily, a belief of is correct (relative to some scenario) if and only if p (at that scenario) — where 'p' has the aforementioned content .(Generalized Norm of Belief) Necessarily, for all propositions , a belief of is correct (relative to some scenario) if and only if is true (at that scenario).Both 'principles' appear to capture the aim(s) of belief. (NBS) particularizes the aims to beliefs of distinct content-types. (GNB) generalizes these aims of (...)
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  • A Partnership for the Ages.Richard H. Dees - forthcoming - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly.
    Burke suggests that we should view society as a partnership between the past, the present, and the future. I defend this idea by outlining how we can understand the interests of the past and future people and the obligations that they have towards each other. I argue that we have forward-looking obligations to leave the world a decent place, and backward-looking obligations to respect the legacy of the past. The latter obligation requires an understanding of the role that traditions and (...)
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  • The Material World and Natural Religion in Hume's Treatise.Paul Russell - 2003 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 85 (3):269-303.
    In the early eighteenth century context there was an intimate connection between problems concerning the existence of the material world and problems of natural religion. Two issues are of particular importance for understanding Hume’s irreligious intentions in the Treatise. First, if we are unable to establish that we know that the material world exists, then all arguments for the existence of God that presuppose knowledge of the material world (i.e. its beauty, order, design, etc.) are placed in doubt. Second, if (...)
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  • American Indian Inferiority in Hume's Second Enquiry.Rodney Roberts - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (1):57-66.
    It is fairly well known that Hume added a footnote to his essay ‘Of National Characters’ in which he asserts that all non-white peoples are naturally inferior to white people. Subsequently, he revised the note to assert only that black people are naturally inferior to white people. But while the view expressed in this footnote has been described as ‘shockingly bigoted’, and even as his ‘racial law,’ it is still commonly thought that in Hume's voluminous writings it is apparently just (...)
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  • Disciplining Skepticism Through Kant's Critique, Fichte's Idealism, and Hegel's Negations.Meghant Sudan - 2021 - In Vicente Raga Rosaleny (ed.), Doubt and Disbelief in Modern European Thought. Springer. pp. 247-272.
    This chapter considers the encounter of skepticism with the Kantian and post-Kantian philosophical enterprise and focuses on the intriguing feature whereby it is assimilated into this enterprise. In this period, skepticism becomes interchangeable with its other, which helps understand the proliferation of many kinds of views under its name and which forms the background for transforming skepticism into an anonymous, routine practice of raising objections and counter-objections to one’s own view. German philosophers of this era counterpose skepticism to dogmatism and (...)
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  • Critical Notice of Annette Baier, A Progress of Sentiments. [REVIEW]Paul Russell - 1993 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 23 (1):107-123.
    "A Progress of Sentiments is a pleasure to read in every way. The book itself is attractively printed and produced. (It includes, for example, some well reproduced and unusual portraits of Hume, a useful chronology of Hume's life, and a carefully organized and comprehensive index.) Baier writes in a lively, smooth, and clear manner. She entirely avoids jargon and needless technicalities. The commentary and discussion is full of insight and interesting observations on the details of Hume's philosophy. The general interpretation (...)
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  • Hume's Skepticism and the Problem of Atheism.Paul Russell - 2021 - In Reacsting Hume and Early Modern Philosophy: Selected Essays. New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 303-339.
    David Hume was clearly a critic of religion. It is still debated, however, whether or not he was an atheist who denied the existence of God. According to some interpretations he was a theist of some kind and others claim he was an agnostic who simply suspends any belief on this issue. This essay argues that Hume’s theory of belief tells against any theistic interpretation – including the weaker, “attenuated” accounts. It then turns to the case for the view that (...)
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  • David Hume Et les Règles Générales : Pourquoi les Philosophes Auraient-Ils Plus Raison Que les Autres?André Lapidus - 2020 - Philosophiques 47 (1):189-224.
    Cet article soutient la thèse selon laquelle les règles générales que Hume introduit dans le Traité de la nature humaine constituent un dispositif de sélection des inférences inductives écartant deux sources d’inefficacités : d’origine émotionnelle, qui réduirait le malaise face à l’éventualité d’une faille dans l’uniformité de la nature ; d’origine cognitive, qui tolèrerait les possibles débordements de l’imagination sur le jugement. Un consensus grandissant depuis quelques décennies fait apparaître à la base de ce dispositif la distinction entre deux sortes (...)
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  • From Cudworth to Hume: Cambridge Platonism and the Scottish Enlightenment.Sarah Hutton - 2012 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 42 (S1):8-26.
    This paper argues that the Cambridge Platonists had stronger philosophical links to Scottish moral philosophy than the received history allows. Building on the work of Michael Gill who has demonstrated links between ethical thought of More, Cudworth and Smith and moral sentimentalism, I outline some links between the Cambridge Platonists and Scottish thinkers in both the seventeenth century and the eighteenth century. I then discuss Hume's knowledge of Cudworth, in Enquiry concerning the Principles of Morals, Enquiry concerning Human Understanding, The (...)
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  • True Religion and Hume's Practical Atheism.Paul Russell - 2020 - In Sceptical Doubt and Disbelief in Modern European Thought. Dordrecht, Netherlands: pp. 191-225.
    The argument and discussion in this paper begins from the premise that Hume was an atheist who denied the religious or theist hypothesis. However, even if it is agreed that that Hume was an atheist this does not tell us where he stood on the question concerning the value of religion. Some atheists, such as Spinoza, have argued that society needs to maintain and preserve a form of “true religion”, which is required for the support of our ethical life. Others, (...)
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  • Hume on What There Is.John H. Dreher - 2020 - Open Journal of Philosophy 10 (2):243-265.
  • Hume, Humans and Animals.Michael-John Turp - 2020 - The Journal of Ethics 24 (1):119-136.
    Hume’s Treatise, Enquiries and Essays contain plentiful material for an investigation into the moral nature of other animals and our moral relations to them. In particular, Hume pays considerable attention to animal minds. He also argues that moral judgment is grounded in sympathy. As sympathy is shared by humans and some other animals, this already hints at the possibility that some animals are morally considerable, even if they are not moral agents. Most contributions to the literature on animal ethics assume (...)
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  • The ‘True Religion’ of the Sceptic: Penelhum Reading Hume’s Dialogues.Willem Lemmens - 2012 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 42 (S1):183-197.
    According to Terence Penelhum, Philo's confession in the last part of Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion reveals on the side of the author a reconciliatory and pacifying attitude towards the liberal moderate clergy of his days. This article investigates whether another reading of this intriguing text is not more appropriate. It defends the idea that Philo's speeches and Cleanthes’ reactions to it in the last part of the Dialogues reveal on Hume's side an attitude of mild despair and isolation towards (...)
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  • Sobre la imaginación y la fantasía en el pensamiento de Hume.Mario Edmundo Chávez Tortolero - 2016 - In Imaginación y conocimiento. De Descartes a Freud. México: Corinter/Gedisa. pp. 51-62.
  • Hume as an Ami de la Liberté: The Reception of His “Idea of a Perfect Commonwealth”.Ryu Susato - 2016 - Modern Intellectual History 13 (3):569-596.
    Despite the recent boom in research on the reception and influence of Hume's writings, most scholars have overlooked the fact that his enigmatic essay “Idea of a Perfect Commonwealth,” published in thePolitical Discoursesin 1752, not only attracted the attention of some French intellectuals before and after the Revolution, but was also taken seriously by a significant number of radicals—such as Paine, Price, Godwin, Wollstonecraft—and other reform-minded Whigs—such as James Mackintosh. Although the influence of Hume's plan onThe Federalist, No 10, has (...)
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  • Critical Notice: James A Harris’ Hume: An Intellectual Biography, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015.Anders Kraal - 2018 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 48 (1):129-141.
    James Harris’s new Hume biography offers, among other things, ‘a series of conjectures as to what Hume’s intentions were in writing in the particular ways that he did about human nature, politics, economics, history, and religion’. The biography is particularly novel with regard to Hume’s intentions when writing about religion, which, Harris argues, were rather benign. Harris fails to appreciate the full extent of the difficulties attaching to his series of conjectures, however.
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  • Reason and Political Economy in Hume.Erik W. Matson - 2019 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 12 (1):26-51.
    This paper examines some connections between Hume’s epistemology in his Treatise of Human Nature and his political economy. I make three claims: First, I argue that it is the development of Hume’s account of the faculty of reason in Book I of the Treatise that leads him to emphasize social science—including political economy—and the humanities over more abstract modes of intellectual inquiry. Second, I argue that Hume’s conception of reason has implications for his methodology in political economy. His perception of (...)
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  • David Hume as a Proto-Weberian: Commerce, Protestantism, and Secular Culture.Margaret Schabas - 2020 - Social Philosophy and Policy 37 (1):190-212.
    David Hume wrote prolifically and influentially on economics and was an enthusiast for the modern commercial era of manufacturing and global trade. As a vocal critic of the Church, and possibly a nonbeliever, Hume positioned commerce at the vanguard of secularism. I here argue that Hume broached ideas that gesture toward those offered by Max Weber in his famous Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism. Hume discerned a strong correlation between economic flourishing and Protestantism, and he pointed to a (...)
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  • Hume on External Existence: A Sceptical Predicament.Dominic K. Dimech - 2018 - Dissertation, University of Sydney
    This thesis investigates Hume’s philosophy of external existence in relation to, and within the context of, his philosophy of scepticism. In his two main works on metaphysics – A Treatise of Human Nature (1739–40) and the first Enquiry (first ed. 1748) – Hume encounters a predicament pertaining to the unreflective, ‘vulgar’ attribution of external existence to mental perceptions and the ‘philosophical’ distinction between perceptions and objects. I argue that we should understand this predicament as follows: the vulgar opinion is our (...)
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  • How Hume Became a Sceptic (2005).McRobert Jennifer - manuscript
  • Doxastic Naturalism and Hume's Voice in the Dialogues.C. M. Lorkowski - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (3):253-274.
    I argue that acknowledging Hume as a doxastic naturalist about belief in a deity allows an elegant, holistic reading of his Dialogues. It supports a reading in which Hume's spokesperson is Philo throughout, and enlightens many of the interpretive difficulties of the work. In arguing this, I perform a comprehensive survey of evidence for and against Philo as Hume's voice, bringing new evidence to bear against the interpretation of Hume as Cleanthes and against the amalgamation view while correcting several standard (...)
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  • A More Dangerous Enemy? Philo’s “Confession” and Hume’s Soft Atheism.Benjamin S. Cordry - 2011 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 70 (1):61-83.
    While Hume has often been held to have been an agnostic or atheist, several contemporary scholars have argued that Hume was a theist. These interpretations depend chiefly on several passages in which Hume allegedly confesses to theism. In this paper, I argue against this position by giving a threshold characterization of theism and using it to show that Hume does not confess. His most important confession does not cross this threshold and the ones that do are often expressive rather than (...)
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  • ‘Things Familiar to the Mind’: Heuristic Style and Elliptical Citation in The Wealth of Nations.Geoffrey Kellow - 2011 - History of the Human Sciences 24 (1):1-18.
    Despite an initially warm reception, over the past two centuries assessments of the literary character of Adam Smith’s The Wealth of Nations have gradually but unmistakably turned negative. This transformation in the public reception of Smith’s text began during his lifetime and culminated in Heilbroner’s assertion that Smith wrote with ‘an encyclopedic mind, but not with the precision of an orderly one’. However, where Heilbroner and many of his predecessors saw obscurity and tedious attention to minor detail, recent scholarship has (...)
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  • A Dívida de Hume Com Pascal.Plínio Junqueira Smith - 2011 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 52 (124):365-384.
  • Hume on Probability.Barry Gower - 1991 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 42 (1):1-19.
  • What Pessimism Is.Paul Prescott - 2012 - Journal of Philosophical Research 37:337-356.
    On the standard view, pessimism is a philosophically intractable topic. Against the standard view, I hold that pessimism is a stance, or compound of attitudes, commitments and intentions. This stance is marked by certain beliefs—first and foremost, that the bad prevails over the good—which are subject to an important qualifying condition: they are always about outcomes and states of affairs in which one is personally invested. This serves to distinguish pessimism from other views with which it is routinely conflated— including (...)
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  • Hume's Labyrinth.Alan Schwerin - 2012 - Annales Philosophici 5:69 - 84.
    In the appendix to his Treatise Hume admits that his philosophy of mind is defective. Reluctantly he asserts that his thought has ensnared him in a labyrinth. Referring specifically to the section in the Treatise on personal identity and the self, the young Scot admits that he is “involv’d in such a labyrinth, that, I must confess, I neither know how to correct my former opinions, nor how to render them consistent.” (Treatise 633) My paper is a critical investigation of (...)
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  • Thomas Reid on Moral Liberty and Common Sense.Douglas McDermid - 1999 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (2):275 – 303.
  • Imaginability, Possibility, and the Puzzle of Imaginative Resistance.Janet Levin - 2011 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (3):391-421.
    It is standard practice in philosophical inquiry to test a general thesis (of the form 'F iff G' or 'F only if G') by attempting to construct a counterexample to it. If we can imagine or conceive of1an F that isn't a G, then we have evidence that there could be an F that isn't a G — and thus evidence against the thesis in question; if not, then the thesis is (at least temporarily) secure. Or so it is standardly (...)
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  • Wonder in the Face of Scientific Revolutions: Adam Smith on Newton's ‘Proof’ of Copernicanism 1.Eric Schliesser - 2005 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (4):697.
    (2005). Wonder in the face of scientific revolutions: Adam Smith on Newton's ‘Proof’ of Copernicanism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 13, No. 4, pp. 697-732. doi: 10.1080/09608780500293042.
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  • Hume as Moralist: A Social Historian's Perspective: Nicholas Phillipson.Nicholas Phillipson - 1978 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 12:140-161.
    In this paper I want to discuss David Hume's views about morals, politics and citizenship and the role of philosophers and philosophizing in modern civil society - what I shall call his theory of civic morality. This is a subject which has been neglected by philosophers, presumably because it is of limited philosophical interest. But it is of considerable interest to the historian who wants to understand Hume's development as a philosopher, to locate his thought within a specific, Scottish context (...)
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  • William Robertson and Scientific Theism.Joshua Ehrlich - 2013 - Modern Intellectual History 10 (3):519-542.
    Scholars have hitherto found little to no place for natural philosophy in the intellectual makeup of the Enlightened historian William Robertson, overlooking his significant contacts with that province and its central relevance to the controversy surrounding David Hume and Lord Kames in the 1750s. Here I reexamine Robertson's Situation of the World at the Time of Christ's Appearance (1755) in light of these contexts. I argue that his foundational sermon drew upon the scientific theism of such thinkers as Joseph Butler, (...)
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  • James Mill, the Scottish Enlightenment and the Problem of Civil Religion.Anna Plassart - 2019 - Modern Intellectual History 16 (3):679-711.
    This article argues for a reassessment of James Mill's anticlerical, and possibly atheistic, brand of secularism. Mill's well-known religious skepticism and criticism of the Church of England, it is suggested, have tended to obscure his otherwise dispassionate assessment of religion as a social phenomenon. The article traces Mill's lifelong belief that religious improvement was a necessary precondition to societal progress, from his first major publication in 1805 to his late advocacy of a tolerant state religion in 1835. In this, Mill (...)
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  • Defining the Scottish Enlightenment: Richard B. Sher, Church and University in the Scottish Enlightenment: The Moderate Literati of Edinburgh.Paul Wood - 2017 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 15 (3):299-311.
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  • Hume's Reading of the Classics at Ninewells, 1749–51.Moritz Baumstark - 2010 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 8 (1):63-77.
    This article provides a re-evaluation of David Hume's intensive reading of the classics at an important moment of his literary and intellectual career. It sets out to reconstruct the extent and depth of this reading as well as the uses – scholarly, philosophical and polemical – to which Hume put the information he had gathered in the course of it. The article contends that Hume read the classics against the grain to collect data on a wide range of cultural information (...)
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  • George Campbell's Critique of Hume on Testimony.Tony Pitson - 2006 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 4 (1):1-15.
    Abstract At stake in the dispute between Campbell and Hume is the basis for our acceptance of testimony. Campbell argues that, contrary to Hume, our acceptance of testimony is prior to experience, while Hume continues to maintain that the appropriation through testimony of the experience of others depends ultimately on one's own experience. I argue that Hume's remarks about testimony provide a non-circular account of the process by which the experience of others may become one's own; and I suggest that (...)
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  • The Melancholy of the Philosopher: Hume and Spinoza on Emotions and Wisdom.Willem Lemmens - 2005 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 3 (1):47-65.
  • Promise and Ritual: Profane and Sacred Symbols in Hume's Philosophy of Religion.Herman De Dijn - 2003 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 1 (1):57-67.
  • The Doctor of Philosophy Will See You Now.Christopher Coope - 2009 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 65:177-214.
    Papers about philosophy, as distinct from papers within it, are like homeopathic medicines – thin in content. We can only hope to provide some substance if we confine ourselves to some particular aspect. The aspect I have chosen to discuss is this. What hope should we have of finding from within this rather curious and academic subject of ours a help in the affairs of life? Could we expect a doctor of philosophy to give practical advice, rather like a medical (...)
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  • Adam Smith and David Hume: With Sympathy*: F. L. Van Holthoon.F. L. Van Holthoon - 1993 - Utilitas 5 (1):35-48.
    Why did Hume drop sympathy as a key concept of his moral philosophy, and why—on the other hand—did Smith make it into the ‘didactic principle’ of his Theory of Moral Sentiments? These questions confront us with the basic issue of ethical theory concerning human nature. My point in dealing with these questions is to show what views of human nature their respective choices involved. And my procedure will be to take a close look at the revisions they made to their (...)
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  • The Phillipsonian Enlightenment.Colin Kidd - 2014 - Modern Intellectual History 11 (1):175-190.
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  • The Duty of Listening.J. P. Day - 1996 - Philosophy 71 (277):461 - 464.
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