Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. What is Working, What is Not, and What We Need to Know: A Meta-Analytic Review of Business Ethics Instruction.Kelsey E. Medeiros, Logan L. Watts, Tyler J. Mulhearn, Logan M. Steele, Michael D. Mumford & Shane Connelly - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (3):245-275.
    Requirements for business ethics education and organizational ethics trainings mark an important step in encouraging ethical behavior among business students and professionals. However, the lack of specificity in these guidelines as to how, what, and where business ethics should be taught has led to stark differences in approaches and content. The present effort uses meta-analytic procedures to examine the effectiveness of current approaches across organizational ethics trainings and business school courses. to provide practical suggestions for business ethics interventions and research. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Review of Instructional Approaches in Ethics Education. [REVIEW]Tyler J. Mulhearn, Logan M. Steele, Logan L. Watts, Kelsey E. Medeiros, Michael D. Mumford & Shane Connelly - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (3):883-912.
    Increased investment in ethics education has prompted a variety of instructional objectives and frameworks. Yet, no systematic procedure to classify these varying instructional approaches has been attempted. In the present study, a quantitative clustering procedure was conducted to derive a typology of instruction in ethics education. In total, 330 ethics training programs were included in the cluster analysis. The training programs were appraised with respect to four instructional categories including instructional content, processes, delivery methods, and activities. Eight instructional approaches were (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • A Comparison of the Effects of Ethics Training on International and US Students.T. Lee Williams, Shane Connelly, Michael Mumford, Alexandra MacDougall, Logan Watts, James Johnson & Logan Steele - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (4):1217-1244.
    As scientific and engineering efforts become increasingly global in nature, the need to understand differences in perceptions of research ethics issues across countries and cultures is imperative. However, investigations into the connection between nationality and ethical decision-making in the sciences have largely generated mixed results. In Study 1 of this paper, a measure of biases and compensatory strategies that could influence ethical decisions was administered. Results from this study indicated that graduate students from the United States and international graduate students (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Are Ethics Training Programs Improving? A Meta-Analytic Review of Past and Present Ethics Instruction in the Sciences.Logan L. Watts, Kelsey E. Medeiros, Tyler J. Mulhearn, Logan M. Steele, Shane Connelly & Michael D. Mumford - 2017 - Ethics and Behavior 27 (5):351-384.
    Given the growing public concern and attention placed on cases of research misconduct, government agencies and research institutions have increased their efforts to develop and improve ethics education programs for scientists. The present study sought to assess the impact of these increased efforts by sampling empirical studies published since the year 2000. Studies published prior to 2000 examined in other meta-analytic work were also included to provide a baseline for assessing gains in ethics training effectiveness over time. In total, this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • A Comparison of the Effects of Ethics Training on International and US Students.Logan M. Steele, James F. Johnson, Logan L. Watts, Alexandra E. MacDougall, Michael D. Mumford, Shane Connelly & T. H. Lee Williams - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (4):1217-1244.
    As scientific and engineering efforts become increasingly global in nature, the need to understand differences in perceptions of research ethics issues across countries and cultures is imperative. However, investigations into the connection between nationality and ethical decision-making in the sciences have largely generated mixed results. In Study 1 of this paper, a measure of biases and compensatory strategies that could influence ethical decisions was administered. Results from this study indicated that graduate students from the United States and international graduate students (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • What Sticks? The Evaluation of a Train-the-Trainer Course in Military Ethics and its Perceived Outcomes.Eva van Baarle, Laura Hartman, Desiree Verweij, Bert Molewijk & Guy Widdershoven - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (1-2):56-77.
    Ethics training has become a common phenomenon in the training of military professionals at all levels. However, the perceived outcomes of this training remain open. In this article, we analyze the experiences of course participants who were interviewed 6–12 months after they had participated in a train-the-trainer course in military ethics developed by the Faculty of Military Sciences of the Netherlands Defence Academy. Through qualitative inductive analysis, it is shown how participants evaluate the training, how they perceive the development of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Biases and Compensatory Strategies: The Efficacy of a Training Intervention.Jensen T. Mecca, Kelsey E. Medeiros, Vincent Giorgini, Carter Gibson, Michael D. Mumford & Shane Connelly - 2016 - Ethics and Behavior 26 (2):128-143.
    Research misconduct is of growing concern within the scientific community. As a result, organizations must identify effective approaches to training for ethics in research. Previous research has suggested that biases and compensatory strategies may represent important influences on the ethical decision-making process. The present effort investigated a training intervention targeting these variables. The results of the intervention are presented, as well as a description of accompanying exercises tapping self-reflection, sensemaking, and forecasting and their differential effectiveness on transfer to an ethical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • America COMPETES at 5 Years: An Analysis of Research-Intensive Universities’ RCR Training Plans.Trisha Phillips, Franchesca Nestor, Gillian Beach & Elizabeth Heitman - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):227-249.
    This project evaluates the impact of the National Science Foundation's policy to promote education in the responsible conduct of research. To determine whether this policy resulted in meaningful RCR educational experiences, our study examined the instructional plans developed by individual universities in response to the mandate. Using a sample of 108 U.S. institutions classified as Carnegie “very high research activity”, we analyzed all publicly available NSF RCR training plans in light of the consensus best practices in RCR education that were (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Using a Two-Tier Test to Examine Taiwanese Graduate Students’ Misunderstanding of Responsible Conduct of Research.Sophia Jui-An Pan & Chien Chou - 2015 - Ethics and Behavior 25 (6):500-527.
    The present study investigates Taiwanese graduate students’ general understanding and misunderstanding of Responsible Conduct of Research. A total of 580 graduate students responded to the self-developed Responsible Conduct of Research Reasoning Test. The results reveal that, first, students did not have sufficient knowledge to reason why a particular instance of research conduct was doable or not. Second, the statistical results show that female students, students majoring in the humanities or the social sciences, doctoral-level students, and students with RCR-related training outperformed (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Closing the Barn Door: Coping with Findings of Research Misconduct by Trainees in the Biomedical Sciences.Barbara K. Redman & Arthur L. Caplan - 2015 - Research Ethics 11 (3):124-132.
    The proportion of research misconduct cases among trainees in the biomedical sciences has risen, raising the question of why, and what are the responsibilities of research administrators and the research community to address this problem. Although there is no definitive research about causes, for trainees the relationship with a research mentor should play a major role in preventing actions that constitute research misconduct. Examination of the limited literature and of the number of cases closed by the US Office of Research (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation