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Stephen Mumford (2012). Moderate Partisanship as Oscillation.

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  1.  1
    Logic, Rules and Intention: The Principal Aim Argument.Leon Culbertson - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (4):440-452.
    Stephen Mumford develops his view of sport spectatorship partly through a rejection of an argument he attributes to Best, which distinguishes between two categories of sports, the ‘purposive’ and the ‘aesthetic’, on the basis of the claim that they have different principal aims. This paper considers the principal aim argument and one feature of Mumford’s rejection of that argument, namely, Best’s observation that the distinctions to which he draws attention are based on logical differences. The paper argues that Mumford misconstrues (...)
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  2.  4
    Scylla and Charybdis: The Purist’s Dilemma.Leon Culbertson - 2016 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 10 (2):175-196.
    This paper explores the view that, on Mumford’s account of the purist, to the degree that the purist adopts an aesthetic perspective, he or she doesn’t watch the sport in question, and to the degree that he or she does watch the sport, there is a loss of aesthetic appreciation. The idea that spectators oscillate between partisanship and purism means that the purist is unable to avoid either the Scylla of not actually watching the sport, or the Charybdis of loss (...)
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  3.  54
    Perception, Aspects and Explanation: Some Remarks on Moderate Partisanship.Leon Culbertson - 2015 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 9 (2):182-204.
    Modifying a contrast introduced by Dixon, Stephen Mumford distinguishes between ‘partisan’ and ‘purist’ ways of watching sport. Recognising that the extreme partisan and extreme purist positions do not explain the nature of sports spectatorship, Mumford follows Dixon in adopting the idea of moderate partisanship. He outlines three theories of spectatorship designed to address the issue of the relationship between the partisan and the purist ways of viewing sport. The true perception theory regards the moderate fan as able to see the (...)
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  4.  13
    A Not-So-Beautiful Game.Graham McFee - 2015 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 9 (2):166-181.
    Although football is often referred to as ‘the beautiful game’, to take that idea very seriously — by aestheticizing the target of spectating — is to misunderstand a purposive sport such as football. Yet such a view seems required by Stephen Mumford’s endorsement of the purist spectator, in contrast to the partisan, as attending to ‘… only aesthetic aspects of sport’. But, first, not all non-purposive appreciation is thereby aesthetic appreciation, as Mumford assumes. And, second, while a technical understanding of (...)
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  5.  14
    Making Sense of the Philosophy of Sport.Graham McFee - 2013 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 7 (4):412-429.
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  6.  18
    Ways of Watching Sport.Stephen Mumford - 2013 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 73:3-15.
    There are many ways that we can watch sport but not all of them are philosophically interesting. One can watch it enthusiastically, casually, fanatically or drunkenly. One might watch only because one has bet on the outcome. Some watch a friend or relative compete and have a narrow focus on one individual's performance. A coach or scout on the lookout for new talent may have completely different interests to a supporter of a team. But what of the ways of watching (...)
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