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Gregory L. Murphy & Douglas L. Medin (1985). The Role of Theories in Conceptual Coherence.

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  1.  4
    Modeling Human Decision-Making: An Overview of the Brussels Quantum Approach.Diederik Aerts, Massimiliano Sassoli de Bianchi, Sandro Sozzo & Tomas Veloz - forthcoming - Foundations of Science:1-28.
    We present the fundamentals of the quantum theoretical approach we have developed in the last decade to model cognitive phenomena that resisted modeling by means of classical logical and probabilistic structures, like Boolean, Kolmogorovian and, more generally, set theoretical structures. We firstly sketch the operational-realistic foundations of conceptual entities, i.e. concepts, conceptual combinations, propositions, decision-making entities, etc. Then, we briefly illustrate the application of the quantum formalism in Hilbert space to represent combinations of natural concepts, discussing its success in modeling (...)
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    Bridging the Gap Between Similarity and Causality: An Integrated Approach to Concepts.Corinne L. Bloch-Mullins - 2018 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 69 (3):605-632.
    A growing consensus in the philosophy and psychology of concepts is that while theories such as the prototype, exemplar, and theory theories successfully account for some instances of concept formation and application, none of them successfully accounts for all such instances. I argue against this ‘new consensus’ and show that the problem is, in fact, more severe: the explanatory force of each of these theories is limited even with respect to the phenomena often cited to support it, as each fails (...)
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    Ontological Constraints in Children's Inductive Inferences: Evidence From a Comparison of Inferences Within Animals and Vehicles.Andrzej Tarlowski - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  4. Perspectives in Imaginative Engagement with Fiction.Elisabeth Camp - 2017 - Philosophical Perspectives 31 (1):73-102.
    I take up three puzzles about our emotional and evaluative responses to fiction. First, how can we even have emotional responses to characters and events that we know not to exist, if emotions are as intimately connected to belief and action as they seem to be? One solution to this puzzle claims that we merely imagine having such emotional responses. But this raises the puzzle of why we would ever refuse to follow an author’s instructions to imagine such responses, since (...)
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  5.  3
    Building Machines That Learn and Think Like People.M. Lake Brenden, D. Ullman Tomer, B. Tenenbaum Joshua & J. Gershman Samuel - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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    Ingredients of Intelligence: From Classic Debates to an Engineering Roadmap.M. Lake Brenden, D. Ullman Tomer, B. Tenenbaum Joshua & J. Gershman Samuel - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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    Learning Abstract Visual Concepts Via Probabilistic Program Induction in a Language of Thought.Matthew C. Overlan, Robert A. Jacobs & Steven T. Piantadosi - 2017 - Cognition 168:320-334.
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    Generalizing Prototype Theory: A Formal Quantum Framework.Diederik Aerts, Jan Broekaert, Liane Gabora & Sandro Sozzo - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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    Concepts as Semantic Pointers: A Framework and Computational Model.Peter Blouw, Eugene Solodkin, Paul Thagard & Chris Eliasmith - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (5):1128-1162.
    The reconciliation of theories of concepts based on prototypes, exemplars, and theory-like structures is a longstanding problem in cognitive science. In response to this problem, researchers have recently tended to adopt either hybrid theories that combine various kinds of representational structure, or eliminative theories that replace concepts with a more finely grained taxonomy of mental representations. In this paper, we describe an alternative approach involving a single class of mental representations called “semantic pointers.” Semantic pointers are symbol-like representations that result (...)
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  10.  10
    The Curse of Expertise: When More Knowledge Leads to Miscalibrated Explanatory Insight.Matthew Fisher & Frank C. Keil - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (5):1251-1269.
    Does expertise within a domain of knowledge predict accurate self-assessment of the ability to explain topics in that domain? We find that expertise increases confidence in the ability to explain a wide variety of phenomena. However, this confidence is unwarranted; after actually offering full explanations, people are surprised by the limitations in their understanding. For passive expertise, miscalibration is moderated by education; those with more education are accurate in their self-assessments. But when those with more education consider topics related to (...)
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  11.  17
    Exploring Human Cognition Using Large Image Databases.Thomas L. Griffiths, Joshua T. Abbott & Anne S. Hsu - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (3):569-588.
    Most cognitive psychology experiments evaluate models of human cognition using a relatively small, well-controlled set of stimuli. This approach stands in contrast to current work in neuroscience, perception, and computer vision, which have begun to focus on using large databases of natural images. We argue that natural images provide a powerful tool for characterizing the statistical environment in which people operate, for better evaluating psychological theories, and for bringing the insights of cognitive science closer to real applications. We discuss how (...)
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  12. An Essentialist Account of Authenticity.George E. Newman - 2016 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 16 (3-4):294-321.
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  13.  3
    Categorization Method Affects the Typicality Effect: ERP Evidence From a Category-Inference Task.Xiaoxi Wang, Yun Tao, Tobias Tempel, Yuan Xu, Siqi Li, Yu Tian & Hong Li - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  14.  4
    Quantum Structure of Negation and Conjunction in Human Thought.Diederik Aerts, Sandro Sozzo & Tomas Veloz - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  15.  1
    Motivated Explanation.Richard Patterson, Joachim T. Operskalski & Aron K. Barbey - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  16.  7
    Building Theory-Based Concepts: Four-Year-Olds Preferentially Seek Explanations for Features of Kinds.Andrei Cimpian & Gina Petro - 2014 - Cognition 131 (2):300-310.
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    The Inscrutability of Colour Similarity.Will Davies - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 171 (2):289-311.
    This paper presents a new response to the colour similarity argument, an argument that many people take to pose the greatest threat to colour physicalism. The colour similarity argument assumes that if colour physicalism is true, then colour similarities should be scrutable under standard physical descriptions of surface reflectance properties such as their spectral reflectance curves. Given this assumption, our evident failure to find such similarities at the reducing level seemingly proves fatal to colour physicalism. I argue that we should (...)
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  18. The Epistemology of Neo-Gettier Epistemology.Robert Lockie - 2014 - South African Journal of Philosophy 33 (2):247-258.
    The paper begins by drawing a number of ‘levels’ distinctions in epistemology. It notes that a theory of knowledge must be an attempt to obtain knowledge . It is suggested that we can make sense of much of the work found in analytic theory of knowledge by seeing three framework assumptions as underpinning this work. First, that to have philosophical knowledge of knowledge requires us to have an analysis. Second, that much of what we require from a theory of knowledge (...)
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  19.  1
    Mapping for Depth and Variety: Using a “Six W’s” Scaffold to Facilitate Concept Mapping for Different History Concepts with Different Degrees of Freedom.Jeng-Yi Tzeng - 2014 - Educational Studies 40 (3):253-276.
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  20.  9
    A Psycho-Historical Research Program for the Integrative Science of Art.Nicolas J. Bullot & Rolf Reber - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):163 - 180.
    Critics of the target article objected to our account of art appreciators' sensitivity to art-historical contexts and functions, the relations among the modes of artistic appreciation, and the weaknesses of aesthetic science. To rebut these objections and justify our program, we argue that the current neglect of sensitivity to art-historical contexts persists as a result of a pervasive aesthetic–artistic confound; we further specify our claim that basic exposure and the design stance are necessary conditions of artistic understanding; and we explain (...)
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  21.  63
    The Artful Mind Meets Art History: Toward a Psycho-Historical Framework for the Science of Art Appreciation.Nicolas J. Bullot & Rolf Reber - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):123-180.
    Research seeking a scientific foundation for the theory of art appreciation has raised controversies at the intersection of the social and cognitive sciences. Though equally relevant to a scientific inquiry into art appreciation, psychological and historical approaches to art developed independently and lack a common core of theoretical principles. Historicists argue that psychological and brain sciences ignore the fact that artworks are artifacts produced and appreciated in the context of unique historical situations and artistic intentions. After revealing flaws in the (...)
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  22. Intentionalism About Moods.Angela Mendelovici - 2013 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 2 (1):126-136.
    According to intentionalism, phenomenal properties are identical to, supervenient on, or determined by representational properties. Intentionalism faces a special challenge when it comes to accounting for the phenomenal character of moods. First, it seems that no intentionalist treatment of moods can capture their apparently undirected phenomenology. Second, it seems that even if we can come up with a viable intentionalist account of moods, we would not be able to motivate it in some of the same kinds of ways that intentionalism (...)
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  23. Concepts in Change.Anna-Mari Rusanen & Samuli Pöyhönen - 2013 - Science and Education 22 (6):1389-1403.
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  24.  3
    Long Life to Emotions: Emotional Response Categorisation Across the Lifespan.Luigi Castelli & Francesca Lanza - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (8):1520-1525.
  25.  9
    The Empirical Case for Role-Governed Categories.Micah B. Goldwater, Arthur B. Markman & C. Hunt Stilwell - 2011 - Cognition 118 (3):359-376.
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  26.  10
    In Praise of Secular Bayesianism.Evan Heit & Shanna Erickson - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (4):202-202.
    It is timely to assess Bayesian models, but Bayesianism is not a religion. Bayesian modeling is typically used as a tool to explain human data. Bayesian models are sometimes equivalent to other models, but have the advantage of explicitly integrating prior hypotheses with new observations. Any lack of representational or neural assumptions may be an advantage rather than a disadvantage.
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  27.  10
    The Campaign for Concepts.Tania Lombrozo - 2011 - Dialogue 50 (1):165-177.
    In his book Doing Without Concepts, Edouard Machery argues that cognitive scientists should reject the concept of “concept” as a natural, psychological kind. I review and critique several of Machery’s arguments, focusing on his definition of “concept” and on claims against the possibility and utility of a unified account of concepts. In particular, I suggest ways in which prototype, exemplar, and theory-theory approaches to concepts might be integrated.
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  28.  12
    Précis de Doing Without Concepts.Édouard Machery - 2011 - Dialogue 50 (1):141-152.
  29.  8
    Replies to Lombrozo, Piccinini, and Poirier and Beaulac.Édouard Machery - 2011 - Dialogue 50 (1):195-212.
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  30. A Tutorial Introduction to Bayesian Models of Cognitive Development.Amy Perfors, Joshua B. Tenenbaum, Thomas L. Griffiths & Fei Xu - 2011 - Cognition 120 (3):302-321.
  31.  42
    Rules, Radical Pragmatics and Restrictions on Regular Polysemy.H. Rabagliati, G. F. Marcus & L. Pylkkanen - 2011 - Journal of Semantics 28 (4):485-512.
    Although regular polysemy [e.g. producer for product (John read Dickens) or container for contents (John drank the bottle)] has been extensively studied, there has been little work on why certain polysemy patterns are more acceptable than others. We take an empirical approach to the question, in particular evaluating an account based on rules against a gradient account of polysemy that is based on various radical pragmatic theories (Fauconnier 1985; Nunberg 1995). Under the gradient approach, possible senses become more acceptable as (...)
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  32.  1
    From Individual to Social Counterintuitiveness: How Layers of Innovation Weave Together to Form Multilayered Tapestries of Human Cultures.M. Afzal Upal - 2011 - Mind and Society 10 (1):79-96.
    The emerging field of cognition and culture has had some success in explaining the spread of counterintuitive religious concepts around the world. However, researchers have been reluctant to extend its findings to explain the widespread occurrence of culturally counterintuitive ideas in general. This article develops a broader notion of social counterintuitiveness to include ideas that violate shared expectations of a group of people and argues that the notion of social counterintuitiveness is more crucial to explaining cultural success of surprising ideas (...)
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  33.  10
    Default Knowledge, Time Pressure, and the Theory-Theory of Concepts.Thomas Blanchard - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):206-207.
    I raise two issues for Machery's discussion and interpretation of the theory-theory. First, I raise an objection against Machery's claim that theory-theorists take theories to be default bodies of knowledge. Second, I argue that theory-theorists' experimental results do not support Machery's contention that default bodies of knowledge include theories used in their own proprietary kind of categorization process.
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  34.  13
    The Perception and Categorisation of Emotional Stimuli: A Review.Tobias Brosch, Gilles Pourtois & David Sander - 2010 - Cognition and Emotion 24 (3):377-400.
  35.  59
    Relational Knowledge: The Foundation of Higher Cognition.Graeme S. Halford, William H. Wilson & Steven Phillips - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (11):497-505.
  36.  10
    Defending the Concept of “Concepts”.Brett K. Hayes & Lauren Kearney - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):214 - 214.
    We critically review key lines of evidence and theoretical argument relevant to Machery's These include interactions between different kinds of concept representations, unified approaches to explaining contextual effects on concept retrieval, and a critique of empirical dissociations as evidence for concept heterogeneity. We suggest there are good grounds for retaining the concept construct in human cognition.
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  37. Person as Scientist, Person as Moralist.Joshua Knobe - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):315.
    It has often been suggested that people’s ordinary capacities for understanding the world make use of much the same methods one might find in a formal scientific investigation. A series of recent experimental results offer a challenge to this widely-held view, suggesting that people’s moral judgments can actually influence the intuitions they hold both in folk psychology and in causal cognition. The present target article distinguishes two basic approaches to explaining such effects. One approach would be to say that the (...)
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  38.  7
    From Conceptual Representations to Explanatory Relations.Tania Lombrozo - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):218-219.
    Machery emphasizes the centrality of explanation for theory-based approaches to concepts. I endorse Machery's emphasis on explanation and consider recent advances in psychology that point to the of explanation, with consequences for Machery's heterogeneity hypothesis about concepts.
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  39. Précis of Doing Without Concepts.Edouard Machery - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 149 (3):602-611.
    Although cognitive scientists have learned a lot about concepts, their findings have yet to be organized in a coherent theoretical framework. In addition, after twenty years of controversy, there is little sign that philosophers and psychologists are converging toward an agreement about the very nature of concepts. Doing without Concepts (Machery 2009) attempts to remedy this state of affairs. In this article, I review the main points and arguments developed at greater length in Doing without Concepts.
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  40.  6
    Précis of Doing Without Concepts.Edouard Machery - 2010 - Mind and Language 25 (5):602-611.
  41.  9
    Précis of Doing Without Concepts.Edouard Machery - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):195-206.
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  42.  39
    Why We Should Do Without Concepts.Barbara C. Malt - 2010 - Mind and Language 25 (5):622-633.
    Machery (2009) has proposed that the notion of ‘concept’ ought to be eliminated from the theoretical vocabulary of psychology. I raise three questions about his argument: (1) Is there a meaningful distinction between concepts and background knowledge? (2) Do we need to discard the hybrid view? (3) Are there really categories of things in the world that are the basis for concepts? Although I argue that the answer to all three is ‘no’, I agree with Machery's conclusion that seeking a (...)
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  43.  1
    /R/-Liaison in English: An Empirical Study.Jose Mompeán-Gonzalez & Pilar Mompeán-Guillamón - 2009 - Cognitive Linguistics 20 (4).
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  44.  11
    Analogy and Conceptual Change in Childhood.John E. Opfer & Leonidas A. A. Doumas - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):723-723.
    Analogical inferences are an important consequence of the way semantic knowledge is represented, that is, with relations as explicit structures that can take arguments. We review evidence that this feature of semantic cognition successfully predicts how quickly and broadly children's concepts change with experience and show that Rogers & McClelland's (R&M's) parallel distributed processing (PDP) model fails to simulate these cognitive changes due to its handling of relational information.
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  45. Darwin's Mistake: Explaining the Discontinuity Between Human and Nonhuman Minds.Derek C. Penn, Keith J. Holyoak & Daniel J. Povinelli - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (2):109-130.
    Over the last quarter century, the dominant tendency in comparative cognitive psychology has been to emphasize the similarities between human and nonhuman minds and to downplay the differences as (Darwin 1871). In the present target article, we argue that Darwin was mistaken: the profound biological continuity between human and nonhuman animals masks an equally profound discontinuity between human and nonhuman minds. To wit, there is a significant discontinuity in the degree to which human and nonhuman animals are able to approximate (...)
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  46.  34
    Précis of Semantic Cognition: A Parallel Distributed Processing Approach.Timothy T. Rogers & James L. McClelland - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):689-714.
    In this prcis we focus on phenomena central to the reaction against similarity-based theories that arose in the 1980s and that subsequently motivated the approach to semantic knowledge. Specifically, we consider (1) how concepts differentiate in early development, (2) why some groupings of items seem to form or coherent categories while others do not, (3) why different properties seem central or important to different concepts, (4) why children and adults sometimes attest to beliefs that seem to contradict their direct experience, (...)
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  47.  4
    Beyond Prototypes and Classical Definitions: Evidence for a Theory-Based Representation of Emotion Concepts.Matthias Siemer - 2008 - Cognition and Emotion 22 (4):620-632.
  48.  16
    From Mere Coincidences to Meaningful Discoveries.Thomas L. Griffiths & Joshua B. Tenenbaum - 2007 - Cognition 103 (2):180-226.
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    Coherence of Structural and Functional Descriptions of Technical Artefacts.Peter Kroes - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (1):137-151.
    Structural and functional descriptions of technical artefacts play an important role in engineering practice. A complete description of a technical artefact involves a description of both functional and structural features. Engineers, moreover, assume that there is an intimate relationship between the function and structure of technical artefacts and they reason from functional properties to structural ones and vice versa. This raises the question of how structural and functional descriptions are related. The kind of inference patterns that establish coherence between structural (...)
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  50.  3
    The Career of Metaphor.Brian F. Bowdle & Dedre Gentner - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (1):193-216.
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