Switch to: References

Citations of:

Millican on the Ontological Argument

Mind 116 (464):1027-1040 (2007)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Existence as a Perfection.Michael Wreen - 2017 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 20 (1):161-172.
    This paper is a defense of the view that existence is a perfection. Anselm’s First Ontological Argument is referred to throughout. Two major objections are advanced: the ‘perfect island’ objection and the ‘perfect devil’ objection. A rebuttal of both, based on Anselm’s reply to Gaunilo, is tendered, but itself faces a major objection. Two lines of defense against this objection are possible. The first is sympathetically explained but it is argued that it ultimately fails. The second, which focuses on the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Ontological Argument Simplified.Gareth B. Matthews & Lynne Rudder Baker - 2010 - Analysis 70 (2):210-212.
    The ontological argument in Anselm’s Proslogion II continues to generate a remarkable store of sophisticated commentary and criticism. However, in our opinion, much of this literature ignores or misrepresents the elegant simplicity of the original argument. The dialogue below seeks to restore that simplicity, with one important modification. Like the original, it retains the form of a reductio, which we think is essential to the argument’s great genius. However, it seeks to skirt the difficult question of whether 'exists' is a (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • The Pinocchio Paradox.Peter Eldridge-Smith & Veronique Eldridge-Smith - 2010 - Analysis 70 (2):212-215.
    The Pinocchio paradox, devised by Veronique Eldridge-Smith in February 2001, is a counter-example to solutions to the Liar that restrict the use or definition of semantic predicates. Pinocchio’s nose grows if and only if what he is stating is false, and Pinocchio says ‘My nose is growing’. In this statement, ‘is growing’ has its normal meaning and is not a semantic predicate. If Pinocchio’s nose is growing it is because he is saying something false; otherwise, it is not growing. ‘Because’ (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Formal Reconstructions of St. Anselm’s Ontological Argument.Esther Ramharter & Günther Eder - 2015 - Synthese 192 (9):2795-2825.
    In this paper, we discuss formal reconstructions of Anselm’s ontological argument. We first present a number of requirements that any successful reconstruction should meet. We then offer a detailed preparatory study of the basic concepts involved in Anselm’s argument. Next, we present our own reconstructions—one in modal logic and one in classical logic—and compare them with each other and with existing reconstructions from the reviewed literature. Finally, we try to show why and how one can gain a better understanding of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Beyond Theism and Atheism: Axiarchism and Ananthropocentric Purposivism.Tim Mulgan - 2017 - Philosophy Compass 12 (6):e12420.
    Two familiar worldviews dominate Western philosophy: materialist atheism and Abrahamic theism. One exciting development in recent philosophy of religion is the exploration of alternatives to both theism and atheism. This paper explores two alternatives: axiarchism and ananthropocentrism. Drawing on the long tradition of Platonism, axiarchists such as John Leslie, Derek Parfit and Nicholas Rescher posit a direct link between goodness and existence. The goodness of a possible world is what makes it actual. Ananthropocentric Purposivism holds that the universe has a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ontological Arguments and the Superiority of Existence: Reply to Nagasawa.Peter Millican - 2007 - Mind 116 (464):1041-1054.
    Yujin Nagasawa accuses me of attributing to Anselm a principle (the 'principle of the superiority of existence', or PSE) which is not present in his text and which weakens, rather than strengthens, his Ontological Argument. I am undogmatic about the interpretative issue, but insist on a philosophical point: that Nagasawa's rejection of PSE does not help the argument, and appears to do so only because he overlooks the same ambiguity that vitiates the original. My conclusion therefore remains: that the fatal (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Is There a Shallow Logical Refutation of the Ontological Argument?Yujin Nagasawa - 2012 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 4 (2):87--99.
    The beauty of Anselm’s ontological argument is, I believe, that no matter how one approaches it, one cannot refute it without making a significant metaphysical assumption, one that is likely to be contentious in its own right. Peter Millican disagrees. He introduces an objection according to which one can refute the argument merely by analysing its shallow logical details, without making any significant metaphysical assumption. He maintains, moreover, that his objection does not depend on a specific reading of the relevant (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Anselmian Theism.Yujin Nagasawa - 2011 - Philosophy Compass 6 (8):564-571.
    In this article, I discuss Anselmian theism, which is arguably the most widely accepted form of monotheism. First, I introduce the core theses of Anselmian theism and consider its historical and developmental origins. I contend that, despite its name, Anselmian theism might well be older than Anselm. I also claim, supporting my argument by reference to research in the cognitive science of religion, that, contrary to what many think, Anselmian theism might be a natural result of human cognitive development rather (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Anselm of Canterbury and Dionysius the Areopagite's Reflections on the Incomprehensibility of God.Gabriel D. Andrus - 2016 - Heythrop Journal 57 (2):269-281.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark