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  1. Is Patriotism Immoral?Richard Arneson - 2013 - Philosophic Exchange 43 (1).
    The principle of patriotism says that we are morally required to favor our own nation and its people. But there is an opposed moral perspective: cosmopolitanism. The cosmopolitan regards herself as a citizen of the world and holds that national borders lack intrinsic, noninstrumental moral significance. The cosmopolitan view is that people are people, and our common humanity is the ground of our moral duties toward people. This paper examines some recent arguments for patriotism, and finds them all wanting. In (...)
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  • Responsabilidad, inclusión y gobernanza global: Una crítica de la concepción estatista de los derechos humanos.Cristina Lafont - 2010 - Isegoría 43:407-434.
    En este ensayo analizo algunas dificultades conceptuales asociadas a la exigencia de que las instituciones globales adquieran un grado mayor de legitimidad democrática. En ausencia de un Estado mundial, puede parecer inconsistente exigir que las instituciones globales sean responsables ante todos los que han de acatar sus decisiones y al mismo tiempo insistir en que los miembros de dichas instituciones, en tanto que representantes de sus respectivos Estados, mantengan las responsabilidades especiales que tienen con los ciudadanos de sus propios países. (...)
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  • Salud y justicia global.Ángel Puyol - 2010 - Isegoría 43:479-502.
    Una de las cuestiones que debería preocupar más a la teoría de la justicia global es la enorme desigualdad de salud que hay en el mundo. En este artículo, se repasan las causas de la desigualdad global de salud y los argumentos éticos a favor y en contra de la necesidad de tratar dicha desigualdad desde la perspectiva de la justicia global. Tras rechazar los argumentos en contra tanto del libertarismo de derechas como del estatalismo, y tras exponer las críticas (...)
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  • Global and Ecological Justice: Prioritising Conflicting Demands.Marcel Wissenburg - 2006 - Environmental Values 15 (4):425-439.
    'Global and ecological justice ' is a very popular catchphrase in policy documents, treaties, publications by think - tanks, NGOs and other bodies. I argue that it represents an informal combination of four distinct and sometimes conflicting ideas: global justice, protection of the ecology, sustainability and sustainable growth. To solve the practical, conceptual and logical complications thus caused, a more precise interpretation of global justice and ecological justice is suggested, on the basis of which it is also possible to rank (...)
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  • Comparative Vs. Transcendental Approaches to Justice: A Misleading Dichotomy in Sen's The Idea of Justice.Francesco Biondo - 2012 - Ratio Juris 25 (4):555-577.
    This paper examines the distinction drawn by Amartya Sen between transcendental and comparative theories of justice, and its application to Rawls' doctrine. It then puts forward three arguments. First, it is argued that Sen offers a limited portrayal of Rawls' doctrine. This is the result of a rhetorical strategy that depicts Rawlsian doctrine as more “transcendental” than it really is. Although Sen deploys numerous quotations in support of his interpretation, it is possible to offer a less transcendental interpretation of Rawls. (...)
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  • Compatriot Partiality and Cosmopolitan Justice: Can We Justify Compatriot Partiality Within the Cosmopolitan Framework?Rachelle Bascara - 2016 - Etikk I Praksis - Nordic Journal of Applied Ethics 10 (2):27-39.
    This paper shows an alternative way in which compatriot partiality could be justified within the framework of global distributive justice. Philosophers who argue that compatriot partiality is similar to racial partiality capture something correct about compatriot partiality. However, the analogy should not lead us to comprehensively reject compatriot partiality. We can justify compatriot partiality on the same grounds that liberation movements and affirmative action have been justified. Hence, given cosmopolitan demands of justice, special consideration for the economic well-being of your (...)
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  • Can Public Virtues Be Global?Warren J. Von Eschenbach - 2020 - Journal of Global Ethics 16 (1):45-57.
    An important issue within the field of global ethics is the extent or scope of moral obligation or duties. Cosmopolitanism argues that we have duties to all human beings by virtue of some common property. Communitarian ethics argue that one’s scope of obligation is circumscribed by one’s community or some other defining property. Public virtues, understood to be either a property that communities possess to function well or a moral excellence constitutive of that community, offer an interesting challenge to this (...)
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  • Amazon and the Self.Andrea Resca & Bendik Bygstad - 2015 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 45 (3):25-32.
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  • Global Tax Governance: The Bullets Internationalists Must Bite – And Those They Must Not.Miriam Ronzoni - 2014 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 1 (1):37-59.
    Under conditions of high capital mobility, states are pressurised into various forms of tax competition to attract or retain capital and investors. When this occurs, the capacity of domestic institutions autonomously to generate fiscal policies is constrained. What exactly, if anything, is unjust about this phenomenon? This paper argues that tax competition puts particular pressure on internationalists, who must acknowledge that its occurrence makes our obligations of global justice more demanding, and that such obligations require supranational institutions in order to (...)
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  • Realising International Justice: To Constrain or to Counter-Incentivise?Douglas Bamford - 2014 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 1 (1):127-146.
    This paper presents a rival proposal to that presented by Dietsch and Rixen to ensure international background justice. It explains the notion of background justice and how this is challenged by the lack of international co-operation on taxation policy. It then presents the principles which Dietsch and Rixen propose in order to respond to this concern: the principle of membership and the principle of constraint. The paper proposes alternative principles of relationship and counter-incentive, which are argued to be superior means (...)
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  • International Trade, Fairness, and Labour Migration.Alexia Herwig & Sylvie Loriaux - 2014 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 1 (2):289-313.
    This paper aims to show that fairness in trade calls for relaxing existing WTO rules to include a greater liberalisation of labour migration. After having addressed several objections to global egalitarianism, it will argue, first, that the world’s rich and the world’s poor participate in a same multilateral trading system whose point is primarily to reduce trade barriers, and hence to establish global economic competitions, in order to raise their standards of living; second, that these competitions are subject to requirements (...)
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  • Do Moral Duties Arise From Global Trade?Andrew Walton - 2014 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 1 (2):249-268.
    This paper discusses the idea that trade – the practice of regularised exchange of goods or services between nation-states for mutual advantage under an orchestrated system of rules – can generate moral duties, duties that exist between only participants in the activity. It considers this idea across three duties often cited as duties of trade: duties not to harm; duties to provide certain basic goods; and duties to distribute benefits and burdens fairly. The paper argues that these three duties seem (...)
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  • On the Fairness of the Multilateral Trading System.Clara Brandi - 2014 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 1 (2):227-247.
    Three perspectives on international trade are present in current debates. From the first perspective, trade is regarded as a set of individual transactions among consenting parties and considerations of fairness and justice barely feature, if at all. The second perspective underlines the importance of background structures for trade, maintained by states, which gives rise considerations of fairness and justice. One prominent version of this perspective, for example as defended by Aaron James, views all trading states as having in principle equal (...)
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  • Global Taxation, Global Reform, and Collective Action.Shmuel Nili - 2014 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 1 (1):83-103.
    This article asks how global tax reform relates to other emerging proposals for global economic reform. Specifically, I will try to contribute to the philosophical understanding of this relationship, by comparing global tax reform with a reform seeking to end dictators’ trading privileges in their peoples’ natural resources. Through this comparison, I intend to establish two main claims. At a concrete, practical level, I hope to show that reform of dictators’ resource privilege will be easier to initiate than legal reform (...)
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  • Contra Politanism.Jacob T. Levy - 2020 - European Journal of Political Theory 19 (2):162-183.
    This article diagnoses and critiques pervasive forms of teleological thought about basic structures of political organization in modern and contemporary political thought: arguments that the sovereign state, the nation-state, or some variant of a cosmopolis both represents the unfolding of history’s moral logic and offers us full moral personhood, agency, and maturity. Despite the received wisdom that modern political thought broke with teleology, I argue that early modern social contract theory was deeply teleological. The emergence of the normatively self-contained sovereign (...)
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  • What Second-Best Scenarios Reveal About Ideals of Global Justice.Christian Barry & David Wiens - 2020 - In Thom Brooks (ed.), Oxford Handbook to Global Justice. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    While there need be no conflict in theory between addressing global inequality (inequalities between people worldwide) and addressing domestic inequality (inequalities between people within a political community), there may be instances in which the feasible mechanism for reducing global inequality risks aggravating domestic inequality. The burgeoning literature on global justice has tended to overlook this type of scenario, and theorists espousing global egalitarianism have consequently not engaged with cases that are important for evaluating and clarifying the content of their theories. (...)
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  • Global Cities, Global Justice?Loren King & Michael Blake - 2018 - Journal of Global Ethics 14 (3):332-352.
    The global city is a contested site of economic innovation and cultural production, as well as profound inequalities of wealth and life chances. These cities, and large cities that aspire to ‘global’ status, are often the point of entry for new immigrants. Yet for political theorists (and indeed many scholars of global institutions), these critical sites of global influence and inequality have not been a significant focus of attention. This is curious. Theorists have wrestled with the nature and demands of (...)
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  • Reply.Alon Harel - 2018 - Jurisprudence 9 (1):159-168.
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  • Internationalizing Nussbaum’s Model of Cosmopolitan Democratic Education.Julian Culp - 2018 - Ethics and Education 13 (2):172-190.
    Nussbaum’s moral cosmopolitanism informs her capability-based theory of justice, which she uses in order to develop a distinctive model of cosmopolitan democratic education. I characterize Nussbaum’s educational model as a ‘statist model,’ however, because it regards cosmopolitan democratic education as necessary for realizing democratic arrangements at the domestic level. The socio-cultural diversity of virtually every nation, Nussbaum argues, renders it mandatory to educate citizens in a cosmopolitan fashion. Citizens must develop empathy and sympathy towards all co-citizens of their domestic polities (...)
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  • How Should Citizens’ Collective Liability for State Action Be Grounded?Robert Huseby - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (3):366-379.
    ABSTRACTThis paper assesses one type of justification for collective liability – the democratic authorization account – according to which citizens can be held liable for what their state does, because they collectively authorize the state’s actions. I argue that the democratic authorization view, properly understood, has an implausibly narrow scope, which risks leaving many victims of injustice without compensation. Hence, I propose a subsidiary account that is wider in scope, and which applies to most cases of state-inflicted harm. This view (...)
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  • Institutional Consequentialism and Global Governance.Attila Tanyi & András Miklós - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (3):279-297.
    Elsewhere we have responded to the so-called demandingness objection to consequentialism – that consequentialism is excessively demanding and is therefore unacceptable as a moral theory – by introducing the theoretical position we call institutional consequentialism. This is a consequentialist view that, however, requires institutional systems, and not individuals, to follow the consequentialist principle. In this paper, we first introduce and explain the theory of institutional consequentialism and the main reasons that support it. In the remainder of the paper, we turn (...)
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  • Disaggregated Pluralistic Theories of Global Distributive Justice – a Critique.Julian Culp - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (2):168-186.
    Pluralistic theories of global distributive justice aim at justifying a plurality of principles for various subglobal contexts of distributive justice. Helena de Bres has recently proposed the class of disaggregated pluralistic theories, according to which we should refrain from defending principles that apply to the shared background conditions of such subglobal contexts. This article argues that if one does not justify how these background conditions should be regulated by principles of a just global basic structure, then the realization of the (...)
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  • African Philosophy and Global Epistemic Injustice.Jonathan O. Chimakonam - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (2):120-137.
    In this paper, I consider how the discourse on global epistemic justice might be approached differently if some contributions from the African philosophical place are taken seriously. To be specific, I argue that the debate on global justice broadly has not been global. I cite as an example, the exclusion or marginalisation of African philosophy, what it has contributed and what it may yet contribute to the global epistemic edifice. I point out that this exclusion is a case of epistemic (...)
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  • Stripping Citizenship: Does Membership Have its (Moral) Privileges?Sahar Akhtar - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (3):419-434.
    If states have the moral authority to decide their memberships by denying citizenship, I argue that they may also strip citizenship, from law-abiding members, for the same reasons. The only real difference is that when states revoke citizenship they may need to compensate people for their prior contributions, but that is not unlike what frequently occurs in divorce. Once just termination rules are established, stripping citizenship could become, like divorce, an everyday event. Partly because of this implication, we should reject (...)
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  • The Fundamental Contradiction of Modern Cosmopolitanism.James Alexander - 2016 - The European Legacy 21 (2):168-183.
    This article is a study of that eminently European contribution to world politics: the idea of cosmopolitanism. The argument is that modern cosmopolitanism depends on two postulates which are contradictory. Cosmopolitans have always claimed, “There are two cities, one higher and one lower.” Modern cosmopolitans, however, claim, without abandoning the first postulate, “There is only one city.” In this article I ask four questions which enable the contradiction between these to be illustrated. These are: Is the cosmopolis the higher of (...)
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  • Overcoming Statism From Within: The International Criminal Court and the Westphalian System.Kevin W. Gray & Kafumu Kalyalya - 2016 - Critical Horizons 17 (1):53-65.
    This paper argues that cosmopolitan law has been more successfully achieved not by appeal to a supra-state authority or community, but by the development of features of existing treaty law. Specifically, it shows how the International Criminal Court's jurisdiction over serious human rights violations has been extended to the citizens and territories of non-member states – and even to otherwise immune state officials – not by challenging the sovereignty of non-member states directly, but on the basis of member states’ own (...)
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  • Is the Debate on ‘Global Justice’ a Global One? Some Considerations in View of Modern Philosophy in Africa.Anke Graness - 2015 - Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):126-140.
    At present, the debate on global justice, a debate which is at the core of global ethics, is largely being conducted by European and American scholars from different disciplines without taking into account views and concepts from other regions of the world, particularly, from the Global South. The lack of a truly intercultural, interreligious, and international exchange of ideas provokes doubts whether the concepts of global justice introduced so far are able to transcend regional and cultural horizons. The article introduces (...)
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  • Philosophy for International Lawyers: A Review of Samantha Besson and John Tasioulas (Eds), The Philosophy of International Law by Patrick Capps. [REVIEW]Patrick Capps - 2011 - Jurisprudence 2 (2):521-528.
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  • Hobbesian Sovereigns and the Question of Supra-State Authority.Sylvie Loriaux - 2014 - Jurisprudence 5 (1):56-74.
    Thomas Hobbes has often been portrayed as supporting a 'realist' view of international relations—a view in which everything is permitted among states, in which the insecurity of the international sphere justifies states in unrestrainedly pursuing the national interest. Yet, as this paper aims to show, this interpretation is not without difficulties. It overshadows both the advantages that Hobbes believes can be gained from interstate cooperation and the fundamental role he attributes to a superior common authority in making cooperative ventures stable (...)
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  • Non-Cosmopolitan Universalism: On Armitage's Foundations of International Political Thought.Duncan Ivison - 2015 - History of European Ideas 41 (1):78-88.
    SummaryIn Foundations of Modern International Thought, David Armitage provides a genealogy of the multiple foundations of international political thought. But he also enables political theorists to reflect on the nature of the pluralisation of our concepts: that is, the way various components come together in particular circumstances to form a concept that either becomes dominant or is rendered to the margins. Armitage claims that concepts can ‘never entirely escape their origins’. In this paper I explore this claim from the perspective (...)
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  • Unlocking the Beauty of the Imperfect Duty to Aid: Sen's Idea of the Duty of Assistance.Susan Murphy - 2014 - Journal of Global Ethics 10 (3):369-383.
    This paper examines the links between acting upon a duty to assist, responsibility for these actions, and how such actions link with incremental moral duties that can amass as a consequence of such action. More specifically, this paper is concerned with practices of international aid and assistance, whereby public and privately funded donations enable the actions of parties outside of the territorial and jurisdictional boundaries of a community and state to directly influence the functioning of that community, and the incremental (...)
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  • A Feminist Argument Against Statism: Public and Private in Theories of Global Justice.Angie Pepper - 2014 - Journal of Global Ethics 10 (1):56-70.
    Cosmopolitanism and statism represent the two dominant liberal theoretical standpoints in the current debate on global distributive justice. In this paper, I will develop a feminist argument that recommends that statist approaches be rejected. This argument has its roots in the feminist critique of liberal theories of social justice. In Justice, Gender, and the Family Susan Moller Okin argues that many liberal egalitarian theories of justice are inadequate because they assume a strict division between public and private spheres. I will (...)
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  • Postcolonialism and Global Justice.Margaret Kohn - 2013 - Journal of Global Ethics 9 (2):187 - 200.
    This paper examines the rhetorical dimension of arguments about global justice. It draws on postcolonial theory, an approach that has explored the relationship between knowledge and power. The global justice literature has elaborated critiques of global inequality and advanced arguments about how to overcome the legacies of domination. These concerns are also shared by critics of colonialism, yet there are also epistemological differences that separate the two scholarly communities. Despite these differences, I argue that bringing the two literatures into conversation (...)
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  • Two Models of Equality and Responsibility.Michael Blake & Mathias Risse - 2008 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 38 (2):165-199.
  • Trade and Climate Change: Environmental, Economic and Ethical Perspectives on Border Carbon Adjustments.Clara Brandi - 2013 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (1):79-93.
    This paper examines the nexus between climate change and trade governance from a normative perspective. Only little research attention has been paid to assessing the interactions between empirical and normative approaches to climate change in the context of potential trade measures. To this end, the paper focuses on currently discussed border carbon adjustment measures. The paper assesses these trade measures from a normative perspective: it explores whether they are compatible or in conflict with development ethics on the one hand and (...)
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  • Humanity or Justice?Stan van Hooft - 2011 - Journal of Global Ethics 7 (3):291-302.
    This paper reflects on a critique of cosmopolitanism mounted by Tom Campbell, who argues that cosmopolitans place undue stress on the issue of global justice. Campbell argues that aid for the impoverished needy in the third world, for example, should be given on the Principle of Humanity rather than on the Principle of Justice. This line of thought is also pursued by ?Liberal Nationalists? like Yael Tamir and David Miller. Thomas Nagel makes a similar distinction and questions whether the ideal (...)
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  • Global Basic Structure and Institutions: The WTO as a Practical Example.Teppo Eskelinen - 2011 - Journal of Global Ethics 7 (1):47 - 58.
    In this article, I discuss the location of the sources of global poverty and injustice. I take it as granted that the members of the globally lowest income group live in unacceptable conditions and suffer from injustice. Yet the source of this injustice is a debatable question. Often the existing global institutions are seen as major causes behind this injustice. By taking the World Trade Organization (WTO) negotiations as a practical example, I aim to show that blaming the institutions as (...)
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  • Beyond the International Relations Framework: An Essay in Descriptive Global Ethics.Des Gasper - 2005 - Journal of Global Ethics 1 (1):5-23.
    Discussions of global ethics—about the types of ethical claim made on individuals and groups, not only states, by individuals and groups around the world—have had to move beyond the categories inherited in the International Relations discipline. Many important positions are not captured by a framework developed for discussion of inter-state relations. The blindspots seem to reflect an outmoded expectation that giving low normative weight to national boundaries correlates strongly with giving more normative weight to people beyond one's national boundaries, and (...)
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  • Concerns About Global Justice : A Response to Critics.Gillian Brock - 2009 - Journal of Global Ethics 5 (3):269 – 280.
    A review essay of Gillian Brock Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Account (Oxford University Press, 2009).
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  • Justice and Peaceful Cooperation.Michael Moehler - 2009 - Journal of Global Ethics 5 (3):195-214.
    Justice is important, but so is peaceful cooperation. In this article, I argue that if one takes seriously the autonomy of individuals and groups and the fact of moral pluralism, a just system of cooperation cannot guarantee peaceful cooperation in a pluralistic world. As a response to this consideration, I develop a contractarian theory that can secure peace in a pluralistic world of autonomous agents, assuming that the agents who exist in this world expect that peaceful cooperation is the most (...)
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  • Completing the Incomplete: A Defense of Positive Obligations to Distant Others.Joshua Kassner - 2009 - Journal of Global Ethics 5 (3):181 – 193.
    Global justice is, at its core, about moral obligations to distant others. But which obligations ought to be included is a matter of considerable debate. In the discussion that follows I will explicate and challenge two objections to the inclusion of foundationally positive obligations in our account of global justice. The first objection is based on the proposition that negative obligations possess and positive obligations lack a property necessary for a moral demand to be a matter justice. The second objection (...)
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  • Obligations Beyond National Borders: International Institutions and Distributive Justice.Amy E. Eckert - 2008 - Journal of Global Ethics 4 (1):67 – 78.
    Recent scholarship has tied duties of distributive justice to the existence of coercive institutions. This body of work argues that, because the international system lacks institutions that can coerce individuals in the same manner as domestic institutions, there are no international obligations to address relative poverty and inequality. Proponents of this view use it to support the existence of a compatriot preference that requires us to meet the needs of compatriots before meeting those of the global poor. Even supposing distributive (...)
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  • Liberal Internationalism and Global Social Justice.Kostas Koukouzelis - 2009 - Journal of Global Ethics 5 (2):97-108.
    Theories of global justice have moved from issues relating to crimes against humanity and war crimes or, furthermore, ?negative duties? with respect to non-citizens, towards problems of distributive justice and global inequality. Thomas Nagel's Storrs Lectures from 2005, exemplifying Rawlsian internationalism, argue that liberal requirements concerning duties of distributive justice apply exclusively within a single nation-state, and do not extend to duties of this nature between rich and poor countries. Nagel even argues that the demand for global equality is not (...)
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  • The Global Consequence of Participatory Responsibility.Henning Hahn - 2009 - Journal of Global Ethics 5 (1):43 – 56.
    The aim of this article is to introduce and defend a revised conception of responsibility - namely, participatory responsibility. It starts from the insight that some pressing problems of global injustice render our common conception of responsibility useless. As an alternative the author mainly discusses Iris Marion Young's social connection model of responsibility. However, Young's approach becomes unconvincing in addressing and weighing specific duties. The author therefore adds a basic rights approach to her conception and argues that mere participation in (...)
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  • Global Social Justice in Theory and Practice.Nicola J. Smith & Harriet Hoffler - 2009 - Journal of Global Ethics 5 (2):77-79.
  • Justice Within Different Borders: A Review of Caney's Global Political Theory. [REVIEW]Margaret R. Moore - 2007 - Journal of Global Ethics 3 (2):255 – 268.
    This essay examines the central claim of Caney's book, viz., that there is no reason to treat the global sphere differently from the domestic sphere. It suggests that there is much that is valuable in having relatively autonomous, differentiated political communities, which both versions of Caney's scope argument ignore. This insight is explored via a critical assessment of both versions of Caney's scope argument; version 1, which is focused on civil and political rights (and argues that that they should be (...)
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  • Cosmopolitan Pacifism.Soran Reader - 2007 - Journal of Global Ethics 3 (1):87 – 103.
    In this paper I argue that cosmopolitanism prohibits war and requires a global approach to criminal justice. My argument proceeds by drawing out some implications of the core cosmopolitan intuition that every human being has a moral status which constrains how they may be treated. In the first part of this paper, I describe cosmopolitanism. In the second part, Cosmopolitanism and War, I analyse violence, consider the standards cosmopolitanism sets for its justification, and argue that war fails to meet them. (...)
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  • Mutually Beneficial Coercion: A Critique of the Coercive Approach to Distributive Justice.Elizabeth C. Hupfer - 2019 - Law and Philosophy 38 (2):195-220.
    According to the coercive approach to distributive justice, the coercive nature of the political state requires justification in the form of distributive benefits owed only to members of the state. In this paper I analyze and dismiss traditional objections to the coercive approach, and I proceed to raise two novel objections. First, according to my equivocation objection, I contend that the coercive approach’s leap from coercive burdens to certain distributive benefits is based on an equivocation. When this equivocation is clarified, (...)
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  • The Neglected Non-Citizen: Statelessness and Liberal Political Theory.Kristy A. Belton - 2011 - Journal of Global Ethics 7 (1):59 - 71.
    The non-citizen is the new ?other?. From popular discourse to political pronouncements and academic research, the non-citizen has become one of the subjects du jour. Among the ranks of the non-citizen, one finds a lesser-known category of people which has yet to be considered seriously by liberal political theory ? the stateless. Thus far, liberal political theory has either ignored this category of persons or subsumed them under the subjects of immigration or refugeehood. The present article challenges this theoretical exclusion (...)
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  • Equality in Law and Philosophy.William E. O'Brian - 2010 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 53 (3):257-284.
    This article discusses various arguments for and against treating equality as a fundamental norm in law and political philosophy, combining prior arguments to the effect that equality is essentially an empty idea with arguments that treat it as a non‐empty but mistaken value that should be rejected. After concluding that most of the arguments for treating equality as a fundamental value fall victim to one or both of these arguments, it considers more closely arguments made by philosophers such as Ronald (...)
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