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  1. Mass Media Campaigns and Organ Donation: Managing Conflicting Messages and Interests. [REVIEW]Mohamed Y. Rady, Joan L. McGregor & Joseph L. Verheijde - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (2):229-241.
    Mass media campaigns are widely and successfully used to change health decisions and behaviors for better or for worse in society. In the United States, media campaigns have been launched at local offices of the states’ department of motor vehicles to promote citizens’ willingness to organ donation and donor registration. We analyze interventional studies of multimedia communication campaigns to encourage organ-donor registration at local offices of states’ department of motor vehicles. The media campaigns include the use of multifaceted communication tools (...)
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  • Good and Not so Good Medical Ethics.Rosamond Rhodes - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (1):71-74.
  • Abandoning the Dead Donor Rule? A National Survey of Public Views on Death and Organ Donation.Michael Nair-Collins, Sydney R. Green & Angelina R. Sutin - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (4):297-302.
  • East–West Differences in Perception of Brain Death: Review of History, Current Understandings, and Directions for Future Research.Qing Yang & Geoffrey Miller - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (2):211-225.
    The concept of brain death as equivalent to cardiopulmonary death was initially conceived following developments in neuroscience, critical care, and transplant technology. It is now a routine part of medicine in Western countries, including the United States. In contrast, Eastern countries have been reluctant to incorporate brain death into legislation and medical practice. Several countries, most notably China, still lack laws recognizing brain death and national medical standards for making the diagnosis. The perception is that Asians are less likely to (...)
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  • Moral Evaluations of Organ Transplantation Influence Judgments of Death and Causation.Michael Nair-Collins & Mary A. Gerend - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (3):283-297.
    Two experiments investigated whether moral evaluations of organ transplantation influence judgments of death and causation. Participants’ beliefs about whether an unconscious organ donor was dead and whether organ removal caused death in a hypothetical vignette varied depending on the moral valence of the vignette. Those who were randomly assigned to the good condition were more likely to believe that the donor was dead prior to organ removal and that organ removal did not cause death. Furthermore, attitudes toward euthanasia and organ (...)
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  • Whole-Brain Death and Integration: Realigning the Ontological Concept with Clinical Diagnostic Tests.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (5):455-481.
    For decades, physicians, philosophers, theologians, lawyers, and the public considered brain death a settled issue. However, a series of recent cases in which individuals were declared brain dead yet physiologically maintained for prolonged periods of time has challenged the status quo. This signals a need for deeper reflection and reexamination of the underlying philosophical, scientific, and clinical issues at stake in defining death. In this paper, I consider four levels of philosophical inquiry regarding death: the ontological basis, actual states of (...)
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  • A Holistic Understanding of Death: Ontological and Medical Considerations.Doyen Nguyen - 2018 - Diametros 55:44-62.
    In the ongoing ‘brain death’ controversy, there has been a constant push for the use of the ‘higher brain’ formulation as the criterion for the determination of death on the grounds that brain-dead individuals are no longer human beings because of their irreversible loss of consciousness and mental functions. This essay demonstrates that such a position flows from a Lockean view of human persons. Compared to the ‘consciousness-related definition of death,’ the substance view is superior, especially because it provides a (...)
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  • Donation After Cardiocirculatory Death: A Call for a Moratorium Pending Full Public Disclosure and Fully Informed Consent.Ari R. Joffe, Joe Carcillo, Natalie Anton, Allan deCaen, Yong Y. Han, Michael J. Bell, Frank A. Maffei, John Sullivan, James Thomas & Gonzalo Garcia-Guerra - 2011 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 6:17.
    Many believe that the ethical problems of donation after cardiocirculatory death (DCD) have been "worked out" and that it is unclear why DCD should be resisted. In this paper we will argue that DCD donors may not yet be dead, and therefore that organ donation during DCD may violate the dead donor rule. We first present a description of the process of DCD and the standard ethical rationale for the practice. We then present our concerns with DCD, including the following: (...)
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  • Acceptance in Theory but Not Practice – Chinese Medical Providers’ Perception of Brain Death.Qing Yang, Yi Fan, Qian Cheng, Xin Li, Kaveh Khoshnood & Geoffrey Miller - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (3):299-313.
    BackgroundThe brain death standard allowing a declaration of death based on neurological criteria is legally endorsed and routinely practiced in the West but not in Asia. In China, attempts to legalize the brain death standard have occurred several times without success. Cultural, religious, and philosophical factors have been proposed to explain this difference, but there is a lack of empirical studies to support this hypothesis.Methods476 medical providers from three academic hospitals in Hunan, China, completed a selfadministered survey including a 12-question (...)
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  • Re-Examining the Origin and Application of Determination of Death by Neurological Criteria : A Commentary on “The Case for Reasonable Accommodation of Conscientious Objections to Declarations of Brain Death” by L. Syd M. Johnson.Geoffrey Miller - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (1):27-29.
  • When Are You Dead Enough to Be a Donor? Can Any Feasible Protocol for the Determination of Death on Circulatory Criteria Respect the Dead Donor Rule?Govert den Hartogh - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (4):299-319.
    The basic question concerning the compatibility of donation after circulatory death protocols with the dead donor rule is whether such protocols can guarantee that the loss of relevant biological functions is truly irreversible. Which functions are the relevant ones? I argue that the answer to this question can be derived neither from a proper understanding of the meaning of the term “death” nor from a proper understanding of the nature of death as a biological phenomenon. The concept of death can (...)
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  • Brain-Dead Patients Are Not Cadavers: The Need to Revise the Definition of Death in Muslim Communities. [REVIEW]Mohamed Y. Rady & Joseph L. Verheijde - 2013 - HEC Forum 25 (1):25-45.
    The utilitarian construct of two alternative criteria of human death increases the supply of transplantable organs at the end of life. Neither the neurological criterion (heart-beating donation) nor the circulatory criterion (non-heart-beating donation) is grounded in scientific evidence but based on philosophical reasoning. A utilitarian death definition can have unintended consequences for dying Muslim patients: (1) the expedited process of determining death for retrieval of transplantable organs can lead to diagnostic errors, (2) the equivalence of brain death with human death (...)
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  • Enrolling Brain-Dead Humans in Medical Research: Stakeholder Opinions.Marilyn C. Morris, Tanya Sachdeva & George E. Hardart - 2014 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 5 (4):22-29.
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