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Symposium

Journal of Hellenic Studies 102:249-249 (1982)

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  1. On Heidegger, Medicine, and the Modernity of Modern Medical Technology.Iain Brassington - 2006 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (2):185-195.
    This paper examines medicine’s use of technology in a manner from a standpoint inspired by Heidegger’s thinking on technology. In the first part of the paper, I shall suggest an interpretation of Heidegger’s thinking on the topic, and attempt to show why he associates modern technology with danger. However, I shall also claim that there is little evidence that medicine’s appropriation of modern technology is dangerous in Heidegger’s sense, although there is no prima facie reason why it mightn’t be. The (...)
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  • Irony and Inspiration: Homer as the Test of Plato’s Philosophical Coherence in the Sixth Essay of Proclus’ Commentary on the Republic.Daniel James Watson - 2017 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 11 (2):149-172.
    _ Source: _Volume 11, Issue 2, pp 149 - 172 Even among sympathetic readers, there abides a sense that Proclus’ attachment to his authorities at least partially blinds him to Socratic irony. This has serious implications for his conciliation of Homer and Plato in the Sixth Essay of his _Commentary on the Republic_. A significant number of the passages in Plato’s dialogues, which Proclus takes as necessitating their agreement, appear to be examples of Socrates’ ironic mode. If this apparent necessity (...)
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  • Women in Political Thought.Helen Pringle - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (3):136 - 159.
    The argument of this paper is that texts in the history of political thought are rather more loquacious on the question of women than has often been supposed. The argument is developed using examples from Plato's Republic, notably the sections on injustice and tyranny. The paper concludes by suggesting the general implications of its approach for the concerns and style of political theory, particularly as to the importance of understanding symbolic and mythic elements in works of political thought.
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  • Reproduction without polarity in the work of Johann Wilhelm Ritter.Jocelyn Holland - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (4):1-14.
    The theories of reproduction that emerged at the end of the eighteenth century exhibited a range in experimental thinking about concepts of gender and sexuality. This essay focuses on the work of a writer who proposed an unusual alternative to polarity-based ideas of reproduction. Johann Wilhelm Ritter was a physicist and friend to the German Romantics and someone whose writing also shares many interests with German Naturphilosophie. The essay discusses how, inspired by ideas from the alchemical tradition, Ritter challenged conventional (...)
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  • The Unacknowledged Socrates in the Works of Luce Irigaray.Shaun O'Dwyer - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (2):28-44.
    In Luce Irigaray's thought, Socrates is a marginal figure compared to Plato or Hegel. However, she does identify the Socratic dialectical position as that of a ‘phallocrat’ and she does conflate Socratic and Platonic philosophy in her psychoanalytic reading of Plato in Speculum of the Other Woman. In this essay, I critically interpret both Irigaray's own texts and the Platonic dialogues in order to argue that: the Socratic dialectical position is not ‘phallocratic’ by Irigaray's own understanding of the term; that (...)
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  • The Lesson of Fire.Maria Esther Maciel - 1998 - Theory, Culture and Society 15 (3-4):393-403.
    This article investigates the concepts of love and eroticism of the Mexican poet and critic Octavio Paz, in his book The Double Flame. The purpose is to show how the author, in his treatment of the intersections between love, eroticism and sexuality in Western cultural life during several centuries, by way of an interdisciplinary and analogical method, makes as well a poetic manifesto in defence of sensitivity against the process of the commercialization of desire in the contemporary world and proposes (...)
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  • Gods, German Scholars, and the Gift of Greece.Claudia Breger - 2006 - Theory, Culture and Society 23 (7-8):111-134.
    This article argues that the abundance of Greek figures and scenarios in Kittler’s recent work points to a shift in his oeuvre, which, however, does not represent a radical break with his ‘hardware studies’. At the turn of the 21st century, Kittler champions an emphatic notion of culture as a necessary supplement to science and technology. This conceptual marriage mediates grand historical narratives of cultural identity. Specifically, Kittler’s texts provide us with narratives of Greek origin which serve to re-capture collective (...)
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  • The Dance of Love.Peter Murphy - 2002 - Thesis Eleven 72 (1):65-90.
    This is a comparative essay on two types of love: the Christian or Romantic type of love that equates love and death; and classical or amicable love that equates love with rhythmical rituals and conjugations. The essay explores the role of instincts, desire, aggression, ecstasy, oblivion, pneumatics, meters and eternal recurrence in love. The question of the relation between love and marriage, love and adultery is posed. Historical forms of love are reviewed, from pederasty and renunciation to courtly and companionate (...)
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  • Truth and Metaphor: Interpretation as Philosophical and Literary Practice.Brayton Polka - 1988 - Diogenes 36 (143):111-128.
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  • A Queer Feeling for Plato: Corporeal Affects, Philosophical Hermeneutics, and Queer Receptions.Emanuela Bianchi - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (2):139-162.
    This paper takes Plato's metaphor of poetic transmission as magnetic charge in the Ion as a central trope for thinking through the various relationships between philosophy and literature; between poetry, interpretation, and truth; and between erotic affects and the material, corporeal, queer dimensions of reception. The affective dimensions of the Platonic text in the Ion, Republic, Symposium, and Phaedrus are examined at length, and the explicit accounts of ascent to philosophical truth are shown to be complicated by the persistence of (...)
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  • Diotima and Demeter as Mystagogues in Plato's Symposium.Nancy Evans - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (2):1-27.
    Like the goddess Demeter, Diotima from Mantineia, the prophetess who teaches Socrates about eros and the “rites of love” in Plato's Symposium, was a mystagogue who initiated individuals into her mysteries, mediating to humans esoteric knowledge of the divine. The dialogue, including Diotima's speech, contains religious and mystical language, some of which specifically evokes the female-centered yearly celebrations of Demeter at Eleusis. In this essay, I contextualize the worship of Demeter within the larger system of classical Athenian practices, and propose (...)
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  • The Unacknowledged Socrates in the Works of Luce Irigaray.Shaun O'Dwyer - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (2):28-44.
    : In Luce Irigaray's thought, Socrates is a marginal figure compared to Plato or Hegel. However, she does identify the Socratic dialectical position as that of a 'phallocrat' and she does conflate Socratic and Platonic philosophy in her psychoanalytic reading of Plato in Speculum of the Other Woman. In this essay, I critically interpret both Irigaray's own texts and the Platonic dialogues in order to argue that: (1) the Socratic dialectical position is not 'phallocratic' by Irigaray's own understanding of the (...)
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  • Diotima and Demeter as Mystagogues in Plato's.Nancy Evans - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (2):1 - 27.
    : Like the goddess Demeter, Diotima from Mantineia, the prophetess who teaches Socrates about eros and the "rites of love" in Plato's Symposium, was a mystagogue who initiated individuals into her mysteries, mediating to humans esoteric knowledge of the divine. The dialogue, including Diotima's speech, contains religious and mystical language, some of which specifically evokes the female-centered yearly celebrations of Demeter at Eleusis. In this essay, I contextualize the worship of Demeter within the larger system of classical Athenian practices, and (...)
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  • On the Difficult Case of Loving Life: Plato's Symposium and Nietzsche's Eternal Recurrence.Melanie Shepherd - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):519-539.
    ABSTRACTA simple but significant historical fact has been overlooked in interpretations of Nietzsche's eternal recurrence. In making eternal recurrence the standard for the affirmation and love of life, Nietzsche accepts an understanding of love developed in Plato's Symposium: love means ‘wanting to possess the good forever’. I argue that Plato develops two distinct types of love, which remain in tension with one another. I then show that a corresponding tension arises in Nietzsche's work when we consider eternal recurrence as the (...)
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  • I Eat Therefore I Am an Essay on Human and Animal Mutuality.Maria Christou - 2013 - Angelaki 18 (4):63-79.
    This essay provides an overview of seminal examples of Western thought in which food features as a means to the conceptual differentiation of the human from the animal. Such an approach allows the emergence of a “structure” that seems to underlie the production of these distinctions. It is, paradoxically, human and animal mutuality – as this is manifested in their common need for, and consumption of, food – that has been utilised as their “differentiator” in the Western tradition and it (...)
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  • “Something Else to Be”1: Singularities and Scapegoating Logics in Toni Morrison's Early Novels.Pelagia Goulimari - 2006 - Angelaki 11 (2):191 – 204.
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  • Athens and Euboea.Harold B. Mattingly - 1961 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 81:124-132.
  • Images for the Sake of the Truth in Plato's Symposium.Yancy Hughes Dominick - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (2):558-566.
    After arriving drunk at Agathon's party, Alcibiades offers to praise Socrates instead of love, the object of the other characters' praise. In praising Socrates, Alcibiades says that he will have to use images . He assures his companions, however, that this ‘is no joke: the image will be for the sake of the truth’ . Alcibiades goes on to present his famous images of a Socrates who is full of divine images , and who casts spells with his words . (...)
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  • Philosophy and Religion in the Thought of Kierkegaard.Michael Weston - 1992 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 32:9-29.
    Kierkegaard is often regarded as a precursor of existential philosophy whose religious concerns may, for philosophical purposes, be safely ignored or, at best, regarded as an unfortunate, if unavoidable, consequence of his complicity with the very metaphysics he did so much to discredit. Kierkegaard himself, however, foresaw this appropriation of his work by philosophy. ‘The existing individual who forgets that he is an existing individual will become more and more absent-minded’, he wrote, ‘and as people sometimes embody the fruits of (...)
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