Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. What is Chemistry That I May Teach It?Peter G. Nelson - 2019 - Foundations of Chemistry 21 (2):179-191.
    This article presents a personal answer to the question “What is chemistry?”, set out in terms of six propositions. These cover “pure” and “applied” chemistry, different levels of description, and the broader context of chemistry.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Spiral as the Fundamental Graphic Representation of the Periodic Law. Blocks of Elements as the Autonomic Parts of the Periodic System.Naum S. Imyanitov - 2016 - Foundations of Chemistry 18 (2):153-173.
    The spiral form of the Periodic Law is proposed as its fundamental graphic representation. This idea is based on the fact that the spiral is the most appropriate form in description transitions from simple to complicated. The spiral is easily obtained from the linear succession of the elements when they are ranged by growing nuclear charge. The spiral can be simply transformed into many other graphic representations, including tables. This paper suggests the conception of the autonomy of blocks. This autonomy (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • On the ‘True Position’ of Hydrogen in the Periodic Table.Vladimir M. Petruševski & Julijana Cvetković - 2018 - Foundations of Chemistry 20 (3):251-260.
    Several attempts have recently been made to point to ‘the proper place’ for hydrogen in the Periodic Table of the elements. There are altogether five different types of arguments that lead to the following conclusions: hydrogen should be placed in group 1, above lithium; hydrogen should be placed in group 17, above fluorine; hydrogen is to be placed in group 14, above carbon; hydrogen should be positioned above both lithium and fluorine and hydrogen should be treated as a stand-alone element, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Modern Version of Lewis’s Theory of Valency.Peter G. Nelson - 2015 - Foundations of Chemistry 17 (2):153-162.
    A modern version of Lewis’s theory of valency is presented. This takes account of the results of quantum–mechanical calculations on molecules. Topics covered are polar covalent bonds, hypervalency, coordinate bonds, nonintegral bonds, oxo-anions, variable valency among transition elements, and nonclassical compounds. A distinction is drawn between the valence shell of an atom and the Lewis shell. The concept of a fractional bond pair is presented.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark