Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Experimental Philosophy on Time.James Norton - 2021 - Philosophy Compass (11).
    Appeals to the ‘common sense’, or ‘naïve’, or ‘folk’ concept of time, and the purported phenomenology as of time passing, play a substantial role in philosophical theorising about time. When making these appeals, philosophers have been content to draw upon their own assumptions about how non-philosophers think about time. This paper reviews a series of recent experiments bringing these assumptions into question. The results suggest that the way non-philosophers think about time is far less metaphysically demanding than philosophers have assumed.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Peirce’s Universal Categories: On Their Potential for Gesture Theory and Multimodal Analysis.Irene Mittelberg - 2019 - Semiotica 2019 (228):193-222.
    Journal Name: Semiotica Issue: Ahead of print.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • A Conversation with Children About Children ….Walter Omar Kohan - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (2).
    In this paper, I present an experience of philosophical dialogue with small children in a public school in Bari, Italy in the context of the Philosophia Ludens for Children project. I present the experience, including the transcripts of six conversations with several groups of children, and then draw some inferences concerning the importance of the relationship between Universities and schools; the philosophical strength of both children’s commitment and philosophical ideas and their positive understanding of childhood.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Facing the Sunrise: Cultural Worldview Underlying Intrinsic-Based Encoding of Absolute Frames of Reference in Aymara.Rafael E. Núñez & Carlos Cornejo - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (6):965-991.
    The Aymara of the Andes use absolute (cardinal) frames of reference for describing the relative position of ordinary objects. However, rather than encoding them in available absolute lexemes, they do it in lexemes that are intrinsic to the body: nayra (“front”) and qhipa (“back”), denoting east and west, respectively. Why? We use different but complementary ethnographic methods to investigate the nature of this encoding: (a) linguistic expressions and speech–gesture co-production, (b) linguistic patterns in the distinct regional Spanish-based variety Castellano Andino (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • The Time Machine in Our Mind.Kurt Stocker - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (3):385-420.
    This article provides the first comprehensive conceptual account for the imagistic mental machinery that allows us to travel through time—for the time machine in our mind. It is argued that language reveals this imagistic machine and how we use it. Findings from a range of cognitive fields are theoretically unified and a recent proposal about spatialized mental time travel is elaborated on. The following novel distinctions are offered: external versus internal viewing of time; ‘‘watching” time versus projective ‘‘travel” through time; (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • How Linguistic and Cultural Forces Shape Conceptions of Time: English and Mandarin Time in 3D.Orly Fuhrman, Kelly McCormick, Eva Chen, Heidi Jiang, Dingfang Shu, Shuaimei Mao & Lera Boroditsky - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (7):1305-1328.
    In this paper we examine how English and Mandarin speakers think about time, and we test how the patterns of thinking in the two groups relate to patterns in linguistic and cultural experience. In Mandarin, vertical spatial metaphors are used more frequently to talk about time than they are in English; English relies primarily on horizontal terms. We present results from two tasks comparing English and Mandarin speakers’ temporal reasoning. The tasks measure how people spatialize time in three-dimensional space, including (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  • Speech and Gesture in Spatial Language and Cognition Among the Yucatec Mayas.Olivier Le Guen - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (5):905-938.
    In previous analyses of the influence of language on cognition, speech has been the main channel examined. In studies conducted among Yucatec Mayas, efforts to determine the preferred frame of reference in use in this community have failed to reach an agreement (Bohnemeyer & Stolz, 2006; Levinson, 2003 vs. Le Guen, 2006, 2009). This paper argues for a multimodal analysis of language that encompasses gesture as well as speech, and shows that the preferred frame of reference in Yucatec Maya is (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Cross-Cultural Differences in Mental Representations of Time: Evidence From an Implicit Nonlinguistic Task.Orly Fuhrman & Lera Boroditsky - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (8):1430-1451.
    Across cultures people construct spatial representations of time. However, the particular spatial layouts created to represent time may differ across cultures. This paper examines whether people automatically access and use culturally specific spatial representations when reasoning about time. In Experiment 1, we asked Hebrew and English speakers to arrange pictures depicting temporal sequences of natural events, and to point to the hypothesized location of events relative to a reference point. In both tasks, English speakers (who read left to right) arranged (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  • Space and Time in the Child’s Mind: Evidence for a Cross-Dimensional Asymmetry.Daniel Casasanto, Olga Fotakopoulou & Lera Boroditsky - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (3):387-405.
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • Numbers and Arithmetic: Neither Hardwired Nor Out There.Rafael Núñez - 2009 - Biological Theory 4 (1):68-83.
    What is the nature of number systems and arithmetic that we use in science for quantification, analysis, and modeling? I argue that number concepts and arithmetic are neither hardwired in the brain, nor do they exist out there in the universe. Innate subitizing and early cognitive preconditions for number— which we share with many other species—cannot provide the foundations for the precision, richness, and range of number concepts and simple arithmetic, let alone that of more complex mathematical concepts. Numbers and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Lexico-Grammatical Alignment in Metaphor Construal.Jenny Lederer - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (1):165-203.
    This study concerns the distribution of metaphorical lexis in discrete syntactic constructions. Source and target seed language from established conceptual metaphors in economic discourse is used to catalogue the specific patterns of how metaphorical pairs align in five syntactic constructions: A-NP, N-N, NP-of-NP, V-NP, and X is Y. Utilizing the Corpus of Contemporary American English, the examination includes 12 frequent metaphorical target triggers combined with 84 source triggers to produce 2,016 ordered collocations, i.e. investment freeze and turbulent market. Through detailed (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Eye Movements Reveal Mental Looking Through Time.Kurt Stocker, Matthias Hartmann, Corinna S. Martarelli & Fred W. Mast - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (7):1648-1670.
    People often make use of a spatial “mental time line” to represent events in time. We investigated whether the eyes follow such a mental time line during online language comprehension of sentences that refer to the past, present, and future. Participants' eye movements were measured on a blank screen while they listened to these sentences. Saccade direction revealed that the future is mapped higher up in space than the past. Moreover, fewer saccades were made when two events are simultaneously taking (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Heart’s Downward Path to Happiness: Cross-Cultural Diversity in Spatial Metaphors of Affect.Yuma Ito & Ewelina Wnuk - 2021 - Cognitive Linguistics 32 (2):195-218.
    Spatial metaphors of affect display remarkable consistencies across languages in mapping sensorimotor experiences onto emotional states, reflecting a great degree of similarity in how our bodies register affect. At the same time, however, affect is complex and there is more than a single possible mapping from vertical spatial concepts to affective states. Here we consider a previously unreported case of spatial metaphors mapping down onto desirable, and up undesirable emotional experiences in Mlabri, an Austroasiatic language of Thailand and Laos, making (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Wheel of Time.Heng Li & Yu Cao - 2019 - Pragmatics and Cognition 26 (2-3):197-214.
    Previous research suggests that both patterns in orthography and cultural-specific associations of space-time affect how people map space onto time. In the current study, we focused on Chinese Buddhists, an understudied population, investigating how religious experiences influence their mental representations of time. Results showed that Chinese Buddhists could represent time spatially corresponding to left-to-right, right-to-left and top-to-bottom orientations in their religious scripts. Specifically, they associated earlier events with the starting point of the reading and later times with the endpoint. We (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Backwards Time: Causal Catachresis and its Influence on Viewpoint Flow.Douglass Virdee - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (2):417-438.
    This paper proposes a cognitive linguistic explanation of the unusual narrative construal of time as moving backwards. It shows that backwards time in narrative involves setting up an alternative space in which a second narrative is constructed simultaneously, resulting in a viewpoint hierarchy which postulates four viewpoints on each discourse statement. The paper draws together research on conceptual metaphor, mental spaces theory and viewpoint multiplicity, bringing it to bear on discourse fragments. The majority of these are taken from Martin Amis’s (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Spatio-Temporal Deixis and Cognitive Models in Early Indo-European.Annamaria Bartolotta - 2018 - Cognitive Linguistics 29 (1):1-44.
    This paper is a comparative study based on the linguistic evidence in Vedic Sanskrit and Homeric Greek, aimed at reconstructing the space-time cognitive models used in the Proto-Indo-European language in a diachronic perspective. While it has been widely recognized that ancient Indo-European languages construed earlier events as in front of later ones, as predicted in the Time-Reference-Point mapping, it is less clear how in the same languages the passage took place from this ‘archaic’ Time-RP model or non-deictic sequence, in which (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Future is in Front, to the Right, or Below: Development of Spatial Representations of Time in Three Dimensions.Ariel Starr & Mahesh Srinivasan - 2021 - Cognition 210:104603.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Praxis Matemática: Reflexiones Sobre la Cognición Que la Hace Posible.Rafael Núñez - 2018 - Theoria : An International Journal for Theory, History and Fundations of Science 33 (2):271-283.
    Mathematics is a unique body of knowledge. Among others, it is abstract, exact, efficient, symbolizable, and it provides astonishing applications to the real world. In the domain of philosophy of mathematics the study of the practice of mathematics has gradually become an important area of investigation. What aspects of the human body and mind make the peculiar practice of mathematics possible? In this article, I briefly review some cogntive dimensions that play a crucial role in the creation and consolidation of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Figurative Language Understanding in LCCM Theory.Vyvyan Evans - 2010 - Cognitive Linguistics 21 (4):601–662.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Temporal Expressions in English and Spanish: Influence of Typology and Metaphorical Construal.Javier Valenzuela & Daniel Alcaraz Carrión - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Event-Based Time in Three Indigenous Amazonian and Xinguan Cultures and Languages.Vera da Silva Sinha - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Clock Walking and Gender: How Circular Movements Influence Arithmetic Calculations.Luisa Lugli, Stefania D’Ascenzo, Anna M. Borghi & Roberto Nicoletti - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Where Are the Months? Mental Images of Circular Time in a Large Online Sample.Bruno Laeng & Anders Hofseth - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Variability in the Alignment of Number and Space Across Languages and Tasks.Andrea Bender, Annelie Rothe-Wulf & Sieghard Beller - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • For the Sciences They Are A‐Changin’: A Response to Commentaries on Núñez Et Al.'s (2019) “What Happened to Cognitive Science?”.Rafael Núñez, Michael Allen, Richard Gao, Carson Miller Rigoli, Josephine Relaford‐Doyle & Arturs Semenuks - 2020 - Topics in Cognitive Science 12 (3):790-803.
  • The Motion Behind the Symbols: A Vital Role for Dynamism in the Conceptualization of Limits and Continuity in Expert Mathematics.Tyler Marghetis & Rafael Núñez - 2013 - Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (2):299-316.
    The canonical history of mathematics suggests that the late 19th-century “arithmetization” of calculus marked a shift away from spatial-dynamic intuitions, grounding concepts in static, rigorous definitions. Instead, we argue that mathematicians, both historically and currently, rely on dynamic conceptualizations of mathematical concepts like continuity, limits, and functions. In this article, we present two studies of the role of dynamic conceptual systems in expert proof. The first is an analysis of co-speech gesture produced by mathematics graduate students while proving a theorem, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • New Space–Time Metaphors Foster New Nonlinguistic Representations.Rose K. Hendricks & Lera Boroditsky - 2017 - Topics in Cognitive Science 9 (3):800-818.
    What is the role of language in constructing knowledge? In this article, we ask whether learning new relational language can create new ways of thinking. In Experiment 1, we taught English speakers to talk about time using new vertical linguistic metaphors, saying things like “breakfast is above dinner” or “breakfast is below dinner”. In Experiment 2, rather than teaching people new metaphors, we relied on the left–right representations of time that our American college student participants have already internalized through a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Both Earlier Times and the Future Are “Front”: The Distinction Between Time- and Ego-Reference-Points in Mandarin Speakers’ Temporal Representation.Chengli Xiao, Mengya Zhao & Lei Chen - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (3):1026-1040.
    Mandarin speakers, like most other language speakers around the world, use spatial terms to talk about time. However, the direction of their mental temporal representation along the front-back axis remains controversial because they use the spatial term “front” to refer to both earlier times and the future. Although the linguistic distinction between time- and ego-reference-point spatiotemporal metaphors in Mandarin suggests a promising clarification of the above controversy, there is little empirical evidence verifying this distinction. In this study, Mandarin speakers’ time- (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Cognitive Metaphor Theory and the Metaphysics of Immediacy.Mathias W. Madsen - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (4):881-908.
    One of the core tenets of cognitive metaphor theory is the claim that metaphors ground abstract knowledge in concrete, first-hand experience. In this paper, I argue that this grounding hypothesis contains some problematic conceptual ambiguities and, under many reasonable interpretations, empirical difficulties. I present evidence that there are foundational obstacles to defining a coherent and cognitively valid concept of “metaphor” and “concrete meaning,” and some general problems with singling out certain domains of experience as more immediate than others. I conclude (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Karma or Immortality: Can Religion Influence Space-Time Mappings?Heng Li & Yu Cao - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (3):1041-1056.
    People implicitly associate the “past” and “future” with “front” and “back” in their minds according to their cultural attitudes toward time. As the temporal focus hypothesis proposes, future-oriented people tend to think about time according to the future-in-front mapping, whereas past-oriented people tend to think about time according to the past-in-front mapping. Whereas previous studies have demonstrated that culture exerts an important influence on people's implicit spatializations of time, we focus specifically on religion, a prominent layer of culture, as potential (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Do Metaphors Move From Mind to Mouth? Evidence From a New System of Linguistic Metaphors for Time.Rose K. Hendricks, Benjamin K. Bergen & Tyler Marghetis - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (8):2950-2975.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Which Is in Front of Chinese People, Past or Future? The Effect of Language and Culture on Temporal Gestures and Spatial Conceptions of Time.Yan Gu, Yeqiu Zheng & Marc Swerts - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (12).
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • It’s All in the Past: Deconstructing the Temporal Doppler Effect.Aleksandar Aksentijevic & John Melvin Gudnyson Treider - 2016 - Cognition 155:135-145.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Gesture or Sign? A Categorization Problem.Corrine Occhino & Sherman Wilcox - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Space–Time Congruency Effect: A Meta‐Analysis.Linda von Sobbe, Edith Scheifele, Claudia Maienborn & Rolf Ulrich - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (1):e12709.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Congruity Effects in Time and Space: Behavioral and ERP Measures.Ursina Teuscher, Marguerite McQuire, Jennifer Collins & Seana Coulson - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (3):563-578.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Time Points: A Gestural Study of the Development of Space–Time Mappings.Patrick Burns, Teresa McCormack, Agnieszka J. Jaroslawska, Patrick A. O'Connor & Eugene M. Caruso - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (12).
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Contours of Time: Topographic Construals of Past, Present, and Future in the Yupno Valley of Papua New Guinea.Rafael Núñez, Kensy Cooperrider, D. Doan & Jürg Wassmann - 2012 - Cognition 124 (1):25-35.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • Time in the Mind: Using Space to Think About Time.Daniel Casasanto & Lera Boroditsky - 2008 - Cognition 106 (2):579-593.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   96 citations  
  • Mapping Spatial Frames of Reference Onto Time: A Review of Theoretical Accounts and Empirical Findings. [REVIEW]Andrea Bender & Sieghard Beller - 2014 - Cognition 132 (3):342-382.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  • Converging on a Theory of Language Through Multiple Methods.Mónica González-Márquez, Michele I. Feist & Liane Ströbel - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
    Assuming that linguistic representation has been studied only by linguists using grammaticality judgments, Branigan & Pickering present structural priming as a novel alternative. We show that their assumptions are incorrect for cognitive-functional linguistics, exposing converging perspectives on form/meaning pairings between generativists and cognitive-functional linguists that we hope will spark the cross-disciplinary discussion necessary to produce a cognitively plausible model of linguistic representation.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Numbers and Numerosities: Absence of Abstract Neural Realization Doesn't Mean Non-Abstraction.Rafael E. Núñez - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3-4):344-344.
    The neural realization of number in abstract form is implausible, but from this it doesn't follow that numbers are not abstract. Clear definitions of abstraction are needed so they can be applied homogenously to numerical and non-numerical cognition. To achieve a better understanding of the neural substrate of abstraction, productive cognition must be investigated.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Conceptual Metaphors in Gesture.Kawai Chui - 2011 - Cognitive Linguistics 22 (3):437–458.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • A Cognitive Grammar Account of Time Motion ‘Metaphors’: A View From Japanese.Shin-Ya Iwasaki - 2009 - Cognitive Linguistics 20 (2).
  • Me, Myself and the Other. Melanesian and Western Ideas on Selfhood and Recognition.Anita Caroline Galuschek - unknown
    In my thesis I argue for a philosophical-anthropological approach which enables investigations in empathy and care by opening up a window on the motivation of recognition. I show how biographies as narratives can help to understand the other within her or his own life-world, even if the life-world is the very part of our personality as a dividually conceived relational self. Therewith, personhood can be conceived in a new concept of personhood that is understood as a category of the human (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Brain Neural Activity Patterns Yielding Numbers Are Operators, Not Representations.Walter J. Freeman & Robert Kozma - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3-4):336.
  • Concrete Magnitudes: From Numbers to Time.Christine Falter, Valdas Noreika, Julian Kiverstein & Bruno Mölder - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3-4):335-336.
    Cohen Kadosh & Walsh (CK&W) present convincing evidence indicating the existence of notation-specific numerical representations in parietal cortex. We suggest that the same conclusions can be drawn for a particular type of numerical representation: the representation of time. Notation-dependent representations need not be limited to number but may also be extended to other magnitude-related contents processed in parietal cortex (Walsh 2003).
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Malagasy Time Conceptions.Casey Woodling - 2017 - Comparative Philosophy 8 (1):63-81.
    In this paper I discuss Øyvind Dahl’s argument for the conclusion that Malagasy people conceive of the future as coming from behind them and not as being before them as most worldviews do. I argue that we have good reason not to attribute this view to Malagasy people. First, it would mark an inefficient and anomalous way of keeping track of the past and future. Second, the linguistic and testimonial evidence presented by Dahl doesn’t support the conclusion. Even though this (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • La Metafora Come Carrefour Cognitivo Del Pensiero E Del Linguaggio.Vito Evola - 2008 - In Cogprints.
    Nell’ultimo trentennio, le scienze cognitive hanno proposto una teoria alternativa a quelle che intendevano la metafora come strumento linguistico, cioè che il processo metaforico si potesse ridurre al livello letterale, semantico o pragmatico. Secondo la teoria della metafora concettuale, la metafora è un modo di rappresentare ed organizzare il nostro mondo, piuttosto che uno strumento semplicemente decorativo del linguaggio avente un ruolo puramente comunicativo. Questo shift paradigmatico ha influenzato anche altri aspetti delle scienze cognitive. In questo contributo si vuole delineare (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Development of Temporal Concepts: Learning to Locate Events in Time.Teresa McCormack & Christoph Hoerl - 2017 - Timing and Time Perception 5 (3-4):297-327.
    A new model of the development of temporal concepts is described that assumes that there are substantial changes in how children think about time in the early years. It is argued that there is a shift from understanding time in an event-dependent way to an event-independent understanding of time. Early in development, very young children are unable to think about locations in time independently of the events that occur at those locations. It is only with development that children begin to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations