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  1. Building a Typology of Forms of Misrecognition: Beyond the Republican-Hegelian Paradigm.João Feres - 2006 - Contemporary Political Theory 5 (3):259-277.
    The article presents a new typology of forms of misrecognition. Through a critique of Axel Honneth's Hegelian-Republican treatment of the issue of recognition, I elaborate an alternative typology of misrecognition forms inspired by Reinhart Koselleck's notion of asymmetric counterconcepts. After deriving three basic forms of misrecognition from historical examples of counterconceptual pairs, I examine some properties of their linguistic articulation as well as the horizons of expectations associated with their usage. The text concludes with an exposition of the comparative advantages (...)
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  • Hermeneutical Injustice, (Self-)Recognition, and Academia.Hilkje Charlotte Hänel - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (2):1-19.
    Miranda Fricker’s account of hermeneutical injustice and remedies for this injustice are widely debated. This article adds to the existing debate by arguing that theories of recog- nition can fruitfully contribute to Fricker’s account of hermeneutical injustice and can provide a framework for structural remedy. By pairing Fricker’s theory of hermeneutical injustice with theories of recognition, I bring forward a modest claim and a more radical claim. The first concerns a shift in our vocabulary; recognition theory can give a name (...)
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  • Imagining New Dialogues About Human Rights: The Implications of Charles Taylor’s Theory of Recognition for Global Feminism.Monica Mookherjee - 2014 - Journal of International Political Theory 10 (2):127-147.
    This article explores the implications of Charles Taylor’s politics of recognition for a global feminist theory. The main contention is that Taylor’s thought implies an innovative dialogue about human rights that assists a flexible understanding of diverse women’s needs. This central claim is developed, however unexpectedly, by focusing on the controversial practice of footbinding. Prevalent in imperial China, this debilitating convention was supported by values that contrast markedly with those of the modern West. The case thus confronts global feminists with (...)
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  • Recognition Without Ethics?Nancy Fraser - 2001 - Theory, Culture and Society 18 (2-3):21-42.
    In the course of the last 30 years, feminist theories of gender have shifted from quasi-Marxist, labor-centered conceptions to putatively ‘post-Marxist’ culture-and identity-based conceptions. Reflecting a broader political move from redistribution to recognition, this shift has been double edged. On the one hand, it has broadened feminist politics to encompass legitimate issues of representation, identity and difference. Yet, in the context of an ascendant neoliberalism, feminist struggles for recognition may be serving less to enrich struggles for redistribution than to displace (...)
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  • Reaching Down and Finding Humanity.Julie Ann Pooley, Myra F. Taylor & Mary Edwards - 2015 - Society and Animals 23 (4):321-342.
    It is conservatively estimated that 12% of all American soldiers who served in the Iraq and Afghanistan fields of engagement have returned home with psychological problems. Research that investigates the psychological underpinnings of these problems is pertinent to meeting the mental health needs of serving and returned soldiers. This study was used to investigate the psychological needs of combat soldiers who adopted strays dog while on deployment, and the impact that ending that bonded relationship had on their actions as they (...)
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  • Dialogue Across Cultural and Ethnic Differences.Basil R. Singh - 2001 - Educational Studies 27 (3):341-355.
    In a liberal, democratic, culturally plural society, it is to be expected that people will differ in their views of the good life and that they will proceed differently in cognitive, evaluative, moral and political matters. Such a society requires a sensibly managed social system where constructive interaction between culturally different groups of individuals can be accommodated. Dialogue as 'communicative relations' is suggested here as a means of containing inter-cultural conflict. Dialogue is seen as more than informal conversation, chat or (...)
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  • Building a Typology of Forms of Misrecognition: Beyond the Republican-Hegelian Paradigm.Jo|[Atilde]|O. Feres - 2006 - Contemporary Political Theory 5 (3):259.