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The Gay Science

Dover Publications (1910)

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  1. Internationalisation, Diversity and the Humanities Curriculum: Cosmopolitanism and Multiculturalism Revisited.James Donald - 2007 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (3):289–308.
  • The Will to Health: A Nietzschean Critique.Clinton E. Betts - 2007 - Nursing Philosophy 8 (1):37-48.
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  • Adorno on Kant, Freedom and Determinism.Timo Jütten - 2012 - European Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):548-574.
    In this paper I argue that Adorno's metacritique of freedom in Negative Dialectics and related texts remains fruitful today. I begin with some background on Adorno's conception of ‘metacritique’ and on Kant's conception of freedom, as I understand it. Next, I discuss Adorno's analysis of the experiential content of Kantian freedom, according to which Kant has reified the particular social experience of the early modern bourgeoisie in his conception of unconditioned freedom. Adorno argues against this conception of freedom and suggests (...)
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  • Levinas and the Philosophy of Religion.Stephen Minister & Jackson Murtha - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (11):1023-1033.
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  • Natural Doubts.Anthony Rudd - 2008 - Metaphilosophy 39 (3):305–324.
    Many philosophers now argue that the doubts of the philosophical sceptic are unnatural ones, in that they are not forced on us by considerations that any reasonable person would have to accept as compelling but only arise if one has already accepted certain controversial theoretical commitments. In this article I defend the naturalness of philosophical scepticism against such criticisms. After defining "global ontological scepticism," I examine the work of a number of anti-sceptical philosophers—Michael Huemer, Michael Williams, and John McDowell. Although (...)
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  • Why Truth? The Snake Sūtra.Jonardon Ganeri - 2002 - Contemporary Buddhism 3 (2):127-139.
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  • When Teachers Must Let Education Hurt: Rousseau and Nietzsche on Compassion and the Educational Value of Suffering.Mark E. Jonas - 2010 - Philosophy of Education 44 (1):45-60.
    Avi Mintz has recently argued that Anglo-American educators have a tendency to alleviate student suffering in the classroom. According to Mintz, this tendency can be detrimental because certain kinds of suffering actually enhance student learning. While Mintz compellingly describes the effects of educator's desires to alleviate suffering in students, he does not examine one of the roots of the desire: the feeling of compassion or pity. Compassion leads many teachers to unreflectively alleviate student struggles. While there are certainly times when (...)
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  • The Practice of Self-Overcoming: Nietzschean Reflections on the Martial Arts.Michael Monahan - 2007 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 34 (1):39-51.
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  • The Potential of Perspectivism for Science Education.Jacob V. Pearce - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (5):531-545.
    Many science teachers are presented with the challenge of characterizing science as a dynamic, human endeavour. Perspectivism, as a hermeneutic philosophy of science, has the potential to be a learning tool for teachers as they elucidate the complex nature of science. Developed earlier by Nietzsche and others, perspectivism has recently re-emerged in the context of the philosophy of science in the work of Ronald Giere. Giere presents a compelling case that scientific theories and scientific observation are perspectival by using science (...)
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  • Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Michael A. Brown, Elizabeth Grimbergen, George David Miller & Hans Seigfried - 1991 - Man and World 24 (1):97-116.
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  • No (More) Philosophy Without Cross-Cultural Philosophy.Karsten J. Struhl - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (4):287-295.
    Philosophy is a radical inquiry whose task is to interrogate the fundamental assumptions of some given activity, discipline, or set of beliefs. In doing so, philosophical inquiry must attempt to delineate a problem and to develop a method for resolving that problem. However, to be true to its intention, philosophy must be able to examine not only the object of its inquiry but also its own method of interrogation. To accomplish this task, philosophical inquiry must be able to create a (...)
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  • Common Sense and the Resistance to Legal Theory.Michael Salter - 1992 - Ratio Juris 5 (2):212-229.
  • From West to East and Back Again: Faith, Doubt and Education in Hermann Hesse's Later Work.Peter Roberts - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (2):249-268.
    This paper examines Hermann Hesse's penultimate novel, The Journey to the East, from an educational point of view. Hesse was a man of the West who turned to the idea of 'the East' in seeking to understand himself and his society. While highly critical of elements of Western modernism, Hesse nonetheless viewed 'the East' through Western lenses and drew inspiration from other Western thinkers. At the end of The Journey to the East, the main character, H.H., believes he has found (...)
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  • On the Meaning of Screens: Towards a Phenomenological Account of Screenness.Lucas D. Introna & Fernando M. Ilharco - 2006 - Human Studies 29 (1):57-76.
    This paper presents a Heideggerian phenomenological analysis of screens. In a world and an epoch where screens pervade a great many aspects of human experience, we submit that phenomenology, much in a traditional methodological form, can provide an interesting and novel basis for our understanding of screens. We ground our analysis in the ontology of Martin Heidegger's Being and Time [1927/1962], claiming that screens will only show themselves as they are if taken as screens-in-the-world. Thus, the phenomenon of screen is (...)
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  • “Clever Beasts Who Invented Knowing”: Nietzsche's Evolutionary Biology of Knowledge. [REVIEW]C. U. M. Smith - 1987 - Biology and Philosophy 2 (1):65-91.
    Nietzsche was a philosopher, not a biologist, Nevertheless his philosophical thought was deeply influenced by ideas emerging from the evolutionary biology of the nineteenth century. His relationship to the Darwinism of his time is difficult to disentangle. It is argued that he was in a sense an unwitting Darwinist. It follows that his philosophical thought is of considerable interest to those concerned to develop an evolutionary biology of mankind. His approach can be likened to that of an extraterrestrial sociobiologist studying (...)
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  • Confounding Solidarity Singular, Universal and Particular Subjects in the Artworks of Tehching Hsieh and the Politics of the New Left.Kam Shapiro - 2013 - Angelaki 18 (4):195-210.
    This essay takes the performance artworks of Tehching Hsieh as instructive allegories for a global ethics as theorized by a variety of left academics who ground universalism in a singularity that escapes the predicates of identity. Hsieh's projects, I argue, also place universal estrangement in the service of liberation for particular marginalized groups whose lives confound our fantasies of recognition. At the same time, they illustrate some of the challenges facing attempts to treat particular struggles as embodiments of universal conflicts.
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  • The Eschatological Theogony of the God Who May Be: Exploring the Concept of Divine Presence in Kearney, Hegel, and Heidegger.Craig M. Nichols - 2005 - Metaphilosophy 36 (5):750-761.
  • Morality and Religion.Tim Mawson - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (6):1033-1043.
    In this article, I look at recent developments in the field of the Philosophy of the relationship between morality, understood in a realist manner, and the primary object of religious belief in the monotheistic religions, God. Some contemporary solutions to the Euthyphro dilemma and versions of moral arguments for the existence of God are discussed.
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  • Regret: A Theoretical and Conceptual Analysis.Janet Landman - 1987 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 17 (2):135–160.
  • The Human Animal Nach Nietzsche Re-Reading Zarathustra's Interspecies Community.Nathan Snaza - 2013 - Angelaki 18 (4):81-100.
    This article examines the double account of the human in Friedrich Nietzsche's writings. Genealogically, Nietzsche insists that humanity is a tamed herd that attacks its own animality. Philologically, this human – through anthropomorphism – sunders itself from those aspects of language that are not representational. Read in relation to this double critique, the article argues that Thus Spoke Zarathustra is an attempt to imagine an entirely different relation between politics and language, one that enables a thinking of a future without (...)
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  • Enhanced, Improved, Perfected?Stephen Rainey - 2012 - The New Bioethics 18 (1):21-35.
    In trying to enhance, improve or perfect ourselves through technological intervention, we can risk the very idea of a practical identity and self-possession. In thinking of the enhancement, improvement or perfection of the body through technological interventions, we ought to acknowledge limits in our outlook at least as seriously as we enjoy the considerable advances offered by technology in general. In postulating the chance of enhancement, improvement and perfection it is important to think about the distinction between what we can (...)
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  • Private Thinkers, Untimely Thoughts: Deleuze, Shestov and Fondane.Bruce Baugh - 2015 - Continental Philosophy Review 48 (3):313-339.
    It has gone largely unnoticed that when Deleuze opposes the “private thinker” to the “public professor,” he is invoking the existential thought of Lev Shestov. The public professor defends established values and preaches submission to the demands of reason and the State; the private thinker opposes thought to reason, “idiocy” to common sense, a people to come to what exists. Private thinkers are solitary, singular and untimely, forced to think against consensus and “the crowd.” Deleuze takes from Shestov and Kierkegaard (...)
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  • Tilting the Ethical Lens: Shame, Disgust, and the Body in Question.Ellen K. Feder - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (3):632-650.
    Cheryl Chase has argued that “the problem” of intersex is one of “stigma and trauma, not gender,” as those focused on medical management would have it. Despite frequent references to shame in the critical literature, there has been surprisingly little analysis of shame, or of the disgust that provokes it. This paper investigates the function of disgust in the medical management of intersex and seeks to understand the consequences—material and moral—with respect to the shame it provokes.Conventional ethical approaches may not (...)
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  • Lost in Translation: The Power of Language.Sandy Farquhar & Peter Fitzsimons - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (6):652-662.
    The paper examines some philosophical aspects of translation as a metaphor for education—a metaphor that avoids the closure of final definitions, in favour of an ongoing and tentative process of interpretation and revision. Translation, it is argued, is a complex process involving language, within and among cultures, and in the exercise of power. Drawing on Foucault's analysis of power, Nietzschean contingency, and the inversion of meaning that characterises the work of Heidegger and Derrida, the paper points towards Ricoeur's notion of (...)
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  • Nietzschean Health and the Inherent Pathology of Christianity.Charlie Huenemann - 2010 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (1):73-89.
  • Of Waters and Women: The Philosophy of Luce Irigaray.Lynda Haas - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (4):150-159.
  • Inner Opacity. Nietzsche on Introspection and Agency.Mattia Riccardi - 2015 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 58 (3):221-243.
    Nietzsche believes that we do not know our own actions, nor their real motives. This belief, however, is but a consequence of his assuming a quite general skepticism about introspection. The main aim of this paper is to offer a reading of this last view, which I shall call the Inner Opacity (IO) view. In the first part of the paper I show that a strong motivation behind IO lies in Nietzsche’s claim that self-knowledge exploits the same set of cognitive (...)
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  • Overcoming Dualism: A Critique of Some Recent Interpretations of Nietzschean Perspectivism.Mark T. Conard - 1994 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 32 (3):251-269.
  • Nietzsche for Nurses: Caring for the Ubermensch.John S. Drummond - 2000 - Nursing Philosophy 1 (2):147-157.
  • Nietzsche on the Nature of the Unconscious.Paul Katsafanas - 2015 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 58 (3):327-352.
    This paper argues that Nietzsche develops a novel and compelling account of the distinction between conscious and unconscious mental states: he argues that conscious mental states are those with conceptual content, whereas unconscious mental states are those with nonconceptual content. I show that Nietzsche’s puzzling claim that consciousness is ‘superficial’ and ‘falsifying’ can be given a straightforward explanation if we accept this understanding of the conscious/unconscious distinction. I originally defended this view in my ‘Nietzsche’s Theory of Mind: Consciousness and Conceptualization’ (...)
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  • The Metamorphoses of Vinciane Despret.Brett Buchanan - 2015 - Angelaki 20 (2):17-32.
    This essay provides a theoretical and methodological introduction to the writings of Vinciane Despret. Over the last twenty years Despret has contributed a significant number of books and articles in the fields of philosophical ethology and animal studies, and throughout them all Despret's methodological approach resists easy explanation. There is no single, uni- versal method applicable to all animals, in every situation; instead, Despret responds with an open curiosity to the plurality of animal worlds and the storied versions about them. (...)
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  • A Vindication of the Rights of Machines.David J. Gunkel - 2014 - Philosophy and Technology 27 (1):113-132.
    This essay responds to the machine question in the affirmative, arguing that artifacts, like robots, AI, and other autonomous systems, can no longer be legitimately excluded from moral consideration. The demonstration of this thesis proceeds in four parts or movements. The first and second parts approach the subject by investigating the two constitutive components of the ethical relationship—moral agency and patiency. In the process, they each demonstrate failure. This occurs not because the machine is somehow unable to achieve what is (...)
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  • Affirmations After God: Friedrich Nietzsche and Richard Dawkins on Atheism.J. Thomas Howe - 2012 - Zygon 47 (1):140-155.
    Abstract. In this essay, I compare the atheism of Friedrich Nietzsche with that of Richard Dawkins. My purpose is to describe certain differences in their respective atheisms with the intent of showing that Nietzsche's atheism contains a richer and fuller affirmation of human life. In Dawkins’s presentation of the value of life without God, there is a naïve optimism that purports that human beings, educated in science and purged of religion, will find lives of easy peace and comfortable wonder. Part (...)
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  • Capitalism, Psychiatry, and Schizophrenia: A Critical Introduction to Deleuze and Guattari?S Anti-Oedipus.Marc Roberts - 2007 - Nursing Philosophy 8 (2):114-127.
  • Normativity for Nietzschean Free Spirits.Simon Robertson - 2011 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (6):591 - 613.
    Abstract A significant portion of recent literature on Nietzsche is devoted to his metaethical views, both critical and positive. This article explores one aspect of his positive metaethics. The specific thesis defended is that Nietzsche is, or is plausibly cast as, a reasons internalist. This, very roughly, is the view that what an agent has normative reason to do depends on that agent's motivational repertoire. Section I sketches some of the metaethical terrain most relevant to Nietzsche's organising ethical project, his (...)
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  • Should We Want God to Exist?Guy Kahane - 2011 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (3):674-696.
    Whether God exists is a metaphysical question. But there is also a neglected evaluative question about God’s existence: Should we want God to exist? Very many, including many atheists and agnostics, appear to think we should. Theists claim that if God didn’t exist things would be far worse, and many atheists agree; they regret God’s inexistence. Some remarks by Thomas Nagel suggest an opposing view: that we should want God not to exist. I call this view anti-theism. I explain how (...)
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  • Thinking Technicity.Richard Beardsworth - 1998 - Cultural Values 2 (1):70-86.
  • Levinas, the Philosophy of Suffering, and the Ethics of Compassion.Richard White - 2012 - Heythrop Journal 53 (1):111-123.
  • Art as Orientation.Norman Kreitman - 2011 - Metaphilosophy 42 (5):642-657.
    What is it that we lack in everyday life that causes us to value art so highly? This article argues that (almost) all values are to be understood in terms of a needs-satisfaction system, and hence that the value of art can be understood only with reference to the state of the appreciator prior to engagement with the artwork. Aesthetic appreciation can be analysed as a process, which can be described in empirically based psychological terms, leading to a functional view (...)
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  • Vampires, Anxieties, and Dreams: Race and Sex in the Contemporary United States.Shannon Winnubst - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (3):1-20.
    : Drawing on several feminist and anti-racist theorists, I use the trope of the vampire to unravel how whiteness, maleness, and heterosexuality feed on the same set of disavowals—of the body, of the Other, of fluidity, of dependency itself. I then turn to Jewelle Gomez's The Gilda Stories (1991) for a counternarrative that, along with Donna Haraway's reading of vampires (1997), retools concepts of kinship and self that undergird racism, sexism, and heterosexism in contemporary U.S. culture.
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  • A Critique of Bernstein’s Beyond Objectivism and Relativism: Science, Hermeneutics, and Praxis. [REVIEW]Jonathan Matusitz & Eric Kramer - 2011 - Poiesis and Praxis 7 (4):291-303.
    This analysis comments on Bernstein’s lack of clear understanding of subjectivity, based on his book, Beyond Objectivism and Relativism: Science, Hermeneutics, and Praxis. Bernstein limits his interpretation of subjectivity to thinkers such as Gadamer and Habermas. The authors analyze the ideas of classic scholars such as Edmund Husserl and Friedrich Nietzsche. Husserl put forward his notion of transcendental subjectivity and phenomenological ramifications of the relationship between subjectivity and objectivity. Nietzsche referred to subjectivity as perspectivism, the inescapable fact that any and (...)
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  • Pragmatism, Genealogy, and Truth.Mark Migotti - 2009 - Dialogue 48 (1):185.
  • A Typology of Nietzsche's Biology.Alfred I. Tauber - 1994 - Biology and Philosophy 9 (1):25-44.
    Friedrich Nietzsche''s will to power, and the philosophical ediface built on this foundation, is formulated on a biologicism that is indebted to a particular post-Darwinian vision of the organism. Of the various models that attempt to formulate a comprehensive organismal biology, Nietzsche unknowingly grasped that of Elie Metchnikoff, who authored the theoretical foundation of modern immunology. Metchnikoff regarded the organism as a disharmonious entity, in constant inner strife between competing cellular activities. Immune functions were responsible for mediating harmonization, which however (...)
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  • Time and Personal Identity in Nietzsche's Theory of Eternal Recurrence.Scott Jenkins - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (3):208-217.
    Friedrich Nietzsche’s theory of eternal recurrence is an essential part of his mature philosophy, but the theory’s metaphysical commitments and practical implications are both obscure. In this essay I consider only the metaphysical elements of the theory, with the aim of determining whether it is possible that we live our lives infinitely many times, as the theory maintains. I argue that the possibility of eternal recurrence turns on issues in personal identity and the metaphysics of time. As I proceed, I (...)
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  • Becoming and Un-Becoming: The Theory and Practice of Anatta.Clare Carlisle - 2006 - Contemporary Buddhism 7 (1):75-89.
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  • Nietzsche's Fourfold Conception of the Self.Robert Miner - 2011 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (4):337-360.
    Abstract Struck by essentialist and anti-essentialist elements in his writings, Nietzsche's readers have wondered whether his conception of the self is incoherent or paradoxical. This paper demonstrates that his conception of the self, while complex, is not paradoxical or incoherent, but contains four distinct levels. Section I shows Schopenhauer as Educator to contain an early description of the four levels: (1) a person's deepest self, embracing all that cannot be educated or molded; (2) a person's ego; (3) a person's ?ideal? (...)
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  • The Free and Unfree Saying Of: I, We, and They.Elliott Levine - 1995 - History of European Ideas 20 (4-6):707-714.
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