Citations of work:

John Nolt (2011). How Harmful Are the Average American's Greenhouse Gas Emissions?

13 found
Order:
Are we missing citations?

PhilPapers citations & references are currently in beta testing. We expect to add many more in the future.

Meanwhile, you can use our bibliography tool to import references for this or another work.

Or you can directly add citations for the above work:

Search for work by author name and title
Add directly by record ID

  1.  11
    Robust Individual Responsibility for Climate Harms.Gianfranco Pellegrino - forthcoming - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-13.
    According to some scholars, while sets of greenhouse gases emissions generate harms deriving from climate change, which can be mitigated through collective actions, individual emissions and mitigation activities seem to be causally insufficient to cause harms. If so, single individuals are neither responsible for climate harms, nor they have mitigation duties. If this view were true, there would be collective responsibility for climate harms without individual responsibility and collective mitigation duties without individual duties: this is puzzling. This paper explores a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  48
    Climate Change, Moral Integrity, and Obligations to Reduce Individual Greenhouse Gas Emissions.Trevor Hedberg - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):64-80.
    Environmental ethicists have not reached a consensus about whether or not individuals who contribute to climate change have a moral obligation to reduce their personal greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper, I side with those who think that such individuals do have such an obligation by appealing to the concept of integrity. I argue that adopting a political commitment to work toward a collective solution to climate change—a commitment we all ought to share—requires also adopting a personal commitment to reduce (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  26
    What’s Wrong with Joyguzzling?Ewan Kingston & Walter Sinnott-Armstrong - 2018 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 21 (1):169-186.
    Our thesis is that there is no moral requirement to refrain from emitting reasonable amounts of greenhouse gases solely in order to enjoy oneself. Joyriding in a gas guzzler provides our paradigm example. We first distinguish this claim that there is no moral requirement to refrain from joyguzzling from other more radical claims. We then review several different proposed objections to our view. These include: the claim that joyguzzling exemplifies a vice, causes or contributes to harm, has negative expected value, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  10
    What’s the Harm in Climate Change?Eric S. Godoy - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):103-117.
    A popular argument against direct duties for individuals to address climate change holds that only states and other powerful collective agents must act. It excuses individual actions as harmless since they are neither necessary nor sufficient to cause harm, arise through normal activity, and have no clear victims. Philosophers have challenged one or more of these assumptions; however, I show that this definition of harm also excuses states and other collective agents. I cite two examples of this in public discourse (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  20
    On Climate Matters: Offsetting, Population, and Justice.Elizabeth Cripps - 2016 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 40 (1):114-128.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6.  1
    Climate Neutrality – Towards An Ethical Conception of Climate Neutrality.Rafael Ziegler - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (3):256-272.
    Over the last decade, climate neutrality has emerged as an empowering, new concept—and it has given rise to concerns that it may be conducive to greenwashing and a disregard for justice and sustainability. Are these concerns justified? This paper argues that there is a qualified case for climate neutrality as part of an integrated approach to climate ethics. There are ethical and economic arguments for climate neutrality. An ethical conception of climate neutrality puts critical emphasis on reduction as well as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Anti-Meaning and Why It Matters.Stephen M. Campbell & Sven Nyholm - 2015 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 1 (4): 694-711.
    It is widely recognized that lives and activities can be meaningful or meaningless, but few have appreciated that they can also be anti-meaningful. Anti-meaning is the polar opposite of meaning. Our purpose in this essay is to examine the nature and importance of this new and unfamiliar topic. In the first part, we sketch four theories of anti-meaning that correspond to leading theories of meaning. In the second part, we argue that anti-meaning has significance not only for our attempts to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  8.  86
    Moral Responsibility for Distant Collective Harms.David Zoller - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (5):995-1010.
    While it is well recognized that many everyday consumer behaviors, such as purchases of sweatshop goods, come at a cost to the global poor, it has proven difficult to argue that even knowing, repeat contributors are somehow morally complicit in those outcomes. Some recent approaches contend that marginal contributions to distant harms are consequences that consumers straightforwardly should have born in mind, which would make consumers seem reckless or negligent. Critics reasonably reply that the bad luck that my innocent purchase (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  43
    Climate Change and Individual Duties to Reduce GHG Emissions.Christian Baatz - 2014 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (1):1-19.
  10.  14
    Fair Shares and Decent Lives.Paul Bowman - 2014 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (1):24-26.
  11. Group Agency and Overdetermination.David Killoren & Bekka Williams - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (2):295-307.
    A morally objectionable outcome can be overdetermined by the actions of multiple individual agents. In such cases, the outcome is the same regardless of what any individual does or does not do. (For a clear example of such a case, imagine the execution of an innocent person by a firing squad.) We argue that, in some of these types of cases, (a) there exists a group agent, a moral agent constituted by individual agents; (b) the group agent is guilty of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  12.  29
    Replies to Critics of 'How Harmful Are the Average American's Greenhouse Gas Emissions?'.John Nolt - 2013 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (1):111-119.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13.  51
    How is Climate Change Harmful? Hartzell-Nichols - 2012 - Ethics and the Environment 17 (2):97-110.
    Discussions of harm are central in the climate ethics literature. Especially in the rapidly emerging body of work addressing the question of whether or not individuals are morally responsible for their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, whether or in what way individuals’ emissions are harmful is a hotly debated question. John Nolt’s recent paper, “How harmful are the average American’s greenhouse gas emissions?” illustrates the prevalence of this framing (Nolt 2011). Here I take a step back and ask what we mean (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations