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  1. Remembering Without Storing: Beyond Archival Models in the Science and Philosophy of Human Memory.Ian O'Loughlin - 2014 - Dissertation,
    Models of memory in cognitive science and philosophy have traditionally explained human remembering in terms of storage and retrieval. This tendency has been entrenched by reliance on computationalist explanations over the course of the twentieth century; even research programs that eschew computationalism in name, or attempt the revision of traditional models, demonstrate tacit commitment to computationalist assumptions. It is assumed that memory must be stored by means of an isomorphic trace, that memory processes must divide into conceptually distinct systems and (...)
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  • Towards Augmented Human Memory: Retrieval-Induced Forgetting and Retrieval Practice in an Interactive, End-of-Day Review.Caterina Cinel, Cathleen Cortis Mack & Geoff Ward - 2018 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 147 (5):632-661.
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  • Internal Attention to Features in Visual Short-Term Memory Guides Object Learning.Judith E. Fan & Nicholas B. Turk-Browne - 2013 - Cognition 129 (2):292-308.
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  • The Dark Side of Incremental Learning: A Model of Cumulative Semantic Interference During Lexical Access in Speech Production.Myrna F. Schwartz Gary M. Oppenheim, Gary S. Dell - 2010 - Cognition 114 (2):227.
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  • Complementary Learning Systems.Randall C. O’Reilly, Rajan Bhattacharyya, Michael D. Howard & Nicholas Ketz - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (6):1229-1248.
    This paper reviews the fate of the central ideas behind the complementary learning systems (CLS) framework as originally articulated in McClelland, McNaughton, and O’Reilly (1995). This framework explains why the brain requires two differentially specialized learning and memory systems, and it nicely specifies their central properties (i.e., the hippocampus as a sparse, pattern-separated system for rapidly learning episodic memories, and the neocortex as a distributed, overlapping system for gradually integrating across episodes to extract latent semantic structure). We review the application (...)
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  • A Unified Framework for Inhibitory Control.Yuko Munakata, Seth A. Herd, Christopher H. Chatham, Brendan E. Depue, Marie T. Banich & Randall C. O’Reilly - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (10):453-459.