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  1. A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Nurses' Ethical Concerns.Barbro Wadensten, Stig Wenneberg, Marit Silén, Ping Fen Tang & Gerd Ahlström - 2008 - Nursing Ethics 15 (6):745-760.
    The aim of this study was to compare Swedish and Chinese nurses' experiences of ethical dilemmas and workplace distress in order to deepen understanding of the challenges neuroscience nurses encounter in different cultures. Qualitative interviews from two previously performed empirical studies in Sweden and China were the basis of this comparative study. Four common content areas were identified in both studies: ethical dilemmas, workplace distress, quality of nursing and managing distress. The themes formulated within each content area were compared and (...)
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  • Ethical Considerations of Refusing Nutrition After Stroke.Lars Sandman, Ingrid Ågren Bolmsjö & Albert Westergren - 2008 - Nursing Ethics 15 (2):147-159.
    The aim of this article is to analyse and discuss the ethically problematic conflict raised by patients with stroke who refuse nutritional treatment. In analysing this conflict, the focus is on four different aspects: (1) Is nutritional treatment biologically necessary? (2) If necessary, is the reason for refusal a functional disability, lack of appetite or motivation, misunderstanding of the situation or a genuine conflict of values? (3) If the latter, what values are involved in the conflict? (4) How should we (...)
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  • Dehydration Among Terminally Ill Patients: An Integrated Ethical and Practical Approach for Caregivers.Dolf De Ridder & Chris Gastmans - 1996 - Nursing Ethics 3 (4):305-316.
    The purpose of this paper is to examine the possibilities and limitations of an ethical and practical approach to terminal dehydration. We have argued that dehydration among terminally ill patients offers an important key to a better understanding of the dying process, and that the caregivers' reactions can lead to a deepening of holistic palliative care. This article makes clear that the moral question of terminal dehydration can only be treated by an interdisciplinary approach. Therefore, before studying the question of (...)
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  • Ethical Issues in the Feeding of Patients Suffering From Dementia: A Focus Group Study of Hospital Staff Responses to Conflicting Principles.Stephen Wilmot, Lesley Legg & Janice Barratt - 2002 - Nursing Ethics 9 (6):599-611.
    Feeding difficulties in older patients who are suffering from dementia present problems with balancing conflicting ethical principles. They have been considered by several writers in recent years, and the views of nursing and care staff have been studied in different contexts. The present study used focus groups to explore the way in which nursing and care staff in a National Health Service trust deal with conflict between ethical principles in this area. Three focus groups were convened, one each from the (...)
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  • Retired Registered Nurses' Stories About Being in Ethically Difficult Care Situations.Eva Melchert, Gigi Udén & Astrid Norberg - 1997 - Nursing Ethics 4 (2):123-134.
    Twelve retired nurses were asked to narrate a care situation in which it had been difficult for them as nurses to know what was the right and good thing to do. The transcribed interviews were examined by content analyses. Physicians were the central coactors in the nurses’ stories. Colleagues were seldom mentioned. Other ward staff were mainly called ‘the girls’. The patient was central and referred to with respect. All the nurses focused on experiential learning. Guiding ethical principles are listed.
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  • Perceptions of Autonomy in the Care of Elderly People in Five European Countries.P. Anne Scott, Maritta Välimäki, Helena Leino-Kilpi, Theo Dassen, Maria Gasull, Chryssoula Lemonidou, Marianne Arndt, Anja Schopp, Riitta Suhonen & Anne Kaljonen - 2003 - Nursing Ethics 10 (1):28-38.
    The focus of this article is perceptions of elderly patients and nurses regarding patients’ autonomy in nursing practice. Autonomy is empirically defined as having two components: information received/given as a prerequisite and decision making as the action. The results indicated differences between staff and patient perceptions of patient autonomy for both components in all five countries in which this survey was conducted. There were also differences between countries in the perceptions of patients and nurses regarding the frequency with which patients (...)
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  • Ethical Reasoning Observed: A Longitudinal Study of Nursing Students.Peter W. Nolan & Doreen Markert - 2002 - Nursing Ethics 9 (3):243-258.
    All nursing courses in the UK include ethics in the curriculum, although there is considerable variation in the content of ethics courses and the teaching methods used to assist the acquisition of ethical reasoning. The effectiveness of ethics courses continues to be disputed, even when the perceptions and needs of students are taken into account in their design. This longitudinal study, carried out in the UK, but with implications for nurse education in other developed countries, explored the ethical understanding of (...)
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  • Perceptions of Autonomy, Privacy and Informed Consent in the Care of Elderly People in Five European Countries: General Overview.Helena Leino-Kilpi, Maritta Välimäki, Theo Dassen, Maria Gasull, Chryssoula Lemonidou, Anja Schopp, P. Anne Scott, Marianne Arndt & Anne Kaljonen - 2003 - Nursing Ethics 10 (1):18-27.
    Ethical issues in the care of elderly people have been identified in many countries. We report the findings of a comparative research project funded by the European Commission, which took place between 1998 and 2001. The project explored the issues of autonomy (part I), privacy (part II) and informed consent (part III) in nursing practice. Data were collected from elderly residents/patients (n = 573) and nursing staff (n = 887) in five European countries: Finland, Spain, Greece, Germany and the UK (...)
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