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  1. Ethical Problems in End-of-Life Decisions for Elderly Norwegians.Marjorie A. Schaffer - 2007 - Nursing Ethics 14 (2):242-257.
    Norwegian health professionals, elderly people and family members experience ethical problems involving end-of-life decision making for elders in the context of the values of Norwegian society. This study used ethical inquiry and qualitative methodology to conduct and analyze interviews carried out with 25 health professionals, six elderly people and five family members about the ethical problems they encountered in end-of-life decision making in Norway. All three participant groups experienced ethical problems involving the adequacy of health care for elderly Norwegians. Older (...)
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  • Clinical Prioritisations of Healthcare for the Aged—Professional Roles.P. Nortvedt, R. Pedersen, K. H. Grøthe, M. Nordhaug, M. Kirkevold, Å Slettebø, B. S. Brinchmann & B. Andersen - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (5):332-335.
    Background: Although fair distribution of healthcare services for older patients is an important challenge, qualitative research exploring clinicians’ considerations in clinical prioritisation within this field is scarce. Objectives: To explore how clinicians understand their professional role in clinical prioritisations in healthcare services for old patients. Design: A semi-structured interview-guide was employed to interview 45 clinicians working with older patients. The interviews were analysed qualitatively using hermeneutical content analysis. Participants: 20 physicians and 25 nurses working in public hospitals and nursing homes (...)
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  • Action Ethical Dilemmas in Surgery: An Interview Study of Practicing Surgeons. [REVIEW]Kirsti Torjuul, Ann Nordam & Venke Sørlie - 2005 - BMC Medical Ethics 6 (1):1-9.
    Background The aim of this study was to describe the kinds of ethical dilemmas surgeons face during practice. Methods Five male and five female surgeons at a University hospital in Norway were interviewed as part of a comprehensive investigation into the narratives of physicians and nurses about ethically difficult situations in surgical units. The transcribed interview texts were subjected to a phenomenological-hermeneutic interpretation. Results No gender differences were found in the kinds of ethical dilemmas identified among male and female surgeons. (...)
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  • Ethical Challenges in Surgery as Narrated by Practicing Surgeons.Kirsti Torjuul, Ann Nordam & Venke Sørlie - 2005 - BMC Medical Ethics 6 (1):1-10.
    Background The aim of this study was to explore the ethical challenges in surgery from the surgeons' point of view and their experience of being in ethically difficult situations. Methods Five male and five female surgeons at a university hospital in Norway were interviewed as part of a comprehensive investigation into the narratives of nurses and physicians about being in such situations. The transcribed interview texts were subjected to a phenomenological-hermeneutic interpretation. Results No differences in ethical reasoning between male and (...)
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  • Ethical Decision Making in Situations of Self-Neglect and Squalor Among Older People.Shannon McDermott - 2011 - Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (1):52-71.
    Current approaches to professional ethics emphasise the importance of upholding the ethical duties of autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice in practice. All are prima facie duties, meaning that they must be respected on their own and, if the duties conflict, it is assumed that the dilemma can be resolved through rational decision making. There are, however, a number of limitations to this approach to professional ethics. This paper explores these limitations through an empirical study that examined the ethical dilemmas facing (...)
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  • Malnutrition in Elder Care: Qualitative Analysis of Ethical Perceptions of Politicians and Civil Servants. [REVIEW]Anna-Greta Mamhidir, Mona Kihlgren & Venke Soerlie - 2010 - BMC Medical Ethics 11 (1):1-7.
    BackgroundFew studies have paid attention to ethical responsibility related to malnutrition in elder care. The aim was to illuminate whether politicians and civil servants reason about malnutrition in elder care in relation to ethical responsibility, and further about possible causes and how to address them.MethodEighteen elected politicians and appointed civil servants at the municipality and county council level from two counties in Sweden were interviewed. They worked at a planning, control and executive level, with responsibility for both the elder care (...)
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  • Dignity of Older People in a Nursing Home: Narratives of Care Providers.Rita Jakobsen & Venke Sørlie - 2010 - Nursing Ethics 17 (3):289-300.
    The purpose of this study was to illuminate the ethically difficult situations experienced by care providers working in a nursing home. Individual interviews using a narrative approach were conducted. A phenomenological-hermeneutic method developed for researching life experience was applied in the analysis. The findings showed that care providers experience ethical challenges in their everyday work. The informants in this study found the balance between the ideal, autonomy and dignity to be a daily problem. They defined the culture they work in (...)
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  • Maintenance of Patients' Integrity in Long-Term Institutional Care.Sari Teeri, Maritta Välimäki, Jouko Katajisto & Helena Leino-Kilpi - 2008 - Nursing Ethics 15 (4):523-535.
    This study aimed to describe and compare the views of nurses and older patients' relatives on factors restricting the maintenance of patient integrity in long-term care. The purposive sample comprised 222 nurses and 213 relatives of older patients in four Finnish long-term care institutions. The data were collected using a self-developed questionnaire addressing five sets of factors relating to patients, relatives, nurses, the organization and society. The maintenance of patient integrity was restricted by: (1) social factors, including lack of respect (...)
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