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Reply to Scheer

Philosophical Investigations 13 (2):165-168 (1990)

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  1. Wittgenstein and the Possibility of Inexplicably Losing Certainties.José María Ariso - 2013 - Philosophical Papers 42 (2):133-150.
    Though Wittgenstein's On Certainty has been influential in analytic epistemology, its interpretation has been enormously controversial. It is true that exegesis has been mainly concerned with the proper characterization of Wittgenstein's very notion of ?certainty?; however, some important questions remain unanswered regarding this notion. On the one hand, I am above all referring to the study of the possibilities we have of retaining a certainty when it has seemingly been placed into question and, on the other hand, of regaining a (...)
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  • The Origins of Wittgenstein's Imaginary Scenarios: Something Old, Something New.Andrew J. Peach - 2004 - Philosophical Investigations 27 (4):299–327.
    The imaginary scenarios that appear in nearly every work of the later Wittgenstein – ones involving laughing cattle, disembodied eyes that see, and the like – are decidedly absent from the Tractatus. What necessitated this change in methodology? A comparison of the Tractatus with the Philosophical Remarks, Wittgenstein's first major work after his return to philosophy, reveals that these devices are the product of something old and something new. The rationale for these devices is already present in the notion of (...)
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  • The Origins of Wittgenstein's Imaginary Scenarios: Something Old, Something New.Andrew J. Peach - 2004 - Philosophical Investigations 27 (4):299-327.
    The imaginary scenarios that appear in nearly every work of the later Wittgenstein – ones involving laughing cattle, disembodied eyes that see, and the like – are decidedly absent from the Tractatus. What necessitated this change in methodology? A comparison of the Tractatus with the Philosophical Remarks, Wittgenstein's first major work after his return to philosophy, reveals that these devices are the product of something old and something new. The rationale for these devices is already present in the notion of (...)
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