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  1. Aristotle on the Noble and the Good: Philosophic Imprecision in the Nicomachean Ethics.John Tutuska - 2013 - Ancient Philosophy 33 (1):159-179.
  • Epicurean Wills, Empty Hopes, and the Problem of Post Mortem Concern.Bill Wringe - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (1-2):289-315.
    Many Epicurean arguments for the claim that death is nothing to us depend on the ‘Experience Constraint’: the claim that something can only be good or bad for us if we experience it. However, Epicurus’ commitment to the Experience Constraint makes his attitude to will-writing puzzling. How can someone who accepts the Experience Constraint be motivated to bring about post mortem outcomes?We might think that an Epicurean will-writer could be pleased by the thought of his/her loved ones being provided for (...)
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  • The Care Dialog: The “Ethics of Care” Approach and its Importance for Clinical Ethics Consultation.Patrick Schuchter & Andreas Heller - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):51-62.
    Ethics consultation in institutions of the healthcare system has been given a standard form based on three pillars: education, the development of guidelines and concrete ethics consultation in case conferences. The spread of ethics committees, which perform these tasks on an organizational level, is a remarkable historic achievement. At the same time it cannot be denied that modern ethics consultation neglects relevant aspects of care ethics approaches. In our essay we present an “ethics of care” approach as well as an (...)
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  • Other-Regarding Virtues and Their Place in Virtue Argumentation Theory.Felipe Oliveira de Sousa - 2020 - Informal Logic 40 (3):317-357.
    In this paper, I argue that, despite the progress made in recent years, virtue argumentation theory still lacks a more systematic acknowledgment of other-regarding virtues. A fuller recognition of such virtues not only enriches the field of research of virtue argumentation theory in significant ways, but also allows for a richer and more intuitive view of the virtuous arguer. A fully virtuous arguer, it is argued, should care to develop both self-regarding and other-regarding virtues. He should be concerned both with (...)
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  • Practical Knowledge, Equal Standing, and Proper Reliance on Others.Carla Bagnoli - forthcoming - Theoria.
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  • Does Death Render Life Absurd?Joshua Lewis Thomas - 2019 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 57 (3):428-453.
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  • Euripides' Heracles in the Flesh.Brooke Holmes - 2008 - Classical Antiquity 27 (2):231-281.
    In this article, I analyze the role of Heracles' famous body in the representation of madness and its aftermath in Euripides' Heracles. Unlike studies of Trachiniae, interpretations of Heracles have neglected the hero's body in Euripides. This reading examines the eruption of that body midway through the tragedy as a part of Heracles that is daemonic and strange, but also integral to his identity. Central to my reading is the figure of the symptom, through which madness materializes onstage. Symptoms were (...)
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  • Cynic Cosmopolitanism.Jason Dockstader - 2018 - European Journal of Political Theory.
    Recently, British Prime Minister Theresa May made a bold anti-cosmopolitan claim: ‘If you believe you are a citizen of the world, you are a citizen of nowhere. You don’t understand what citizenship...
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  • Hellenistic Philosophy in Greek and Roman Times.Ioanna-Soultana Kotsori - 2019 - Open Journal for Studies in Philosophy 3 (1):1-6.
    The new Hellenistic philosophies that emerged in Athens at the end of the 4th century BC – mainly Stoicism and Epicureanism – were largely non-original and second choice, compared to Plato and Aristotle. Unlike what happened with the works of Plato and Aristotle, the works of early Hellenistic era were lost on a large scale. However, they became the dominant philosophies of the next five centuries, and were extended from Greece to Rome and the distant provinces of the Roman Empire. (...)
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  • La suspensión estoica del sentido de justicia.Rodrigo Braicovich - 2019 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 27:02707-02707.
    The aim of the paper will be to analyze the different strategies that the Stoics of the Imperial times designed in order to put our sense of justice on hold, due to the fact that it is deemed responsible for certain attitudes which do not contribute to our search for _eudaimonía_. I will organize such strategies in two groups: the first one corresponds to the strategies that target the idea that an injustice has been committed; the second one corresponds to (...)
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  • The Middle Included - Logos in Aristotle.Ömer Aygün - 2017 - Evanston, Illinois, Amerika Birleşik Devletleri: Northwestern University Press.
    The Middle Included is a systematic exploration of the meanings of logos throughout Aristotle’s work. It claims that the basic meaning is “gathering,” a relation that holds its terms together without isolating them or collapsing one to the other. This meaning also applies to logos in the sense of human language. Aristotle describes how some animals are capable of understanding non-firsthand experience without being able to relay it, while others relay it without understanding. Aygün argues that what distinguishes human language, (...)
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  • Practical Wisdom, Justice and Human Dignity: Some Comments on the Consensus Statement of the Working Group on Roman Catholic Approaches to Determining Appropriate Critical Care.G. K. Becker - 2001 - Christian Bioethics 7 (2):265-270.
  • Rousseauovo Poimanje Samilosti: Suvremene Psihoanalitičke Perspektive.Karla Lončar & Želijka Matijašević - 2014 - Filozofska Istrazivanja 34 (1-2):139-152.
    Članak analizira Rousseauovu upotrebu pojmova ljubavi prema sebi, samilosti i samoljublja te njihov odnos prema modernim psihoanalitičkim pojmovima. Ljubav prema sebi dovodi se u vezu s Freudovim pojmom samoočuvanja; samoljublje je povezano s narcističkom veličajnošću i bahatošću, dok samilost ukazuje na sličnost s modernim konceptom empatije. Rousseauovo razlikovanje između navedena tri pojma u skladu je s temeljnom rasprom u psihoanalitičkoj teoriji: onoj između nagonskih i objektnih teorija. Rousseauova misao može se, predpsihoanalitički, protumačiti u smislu obuhvaćanja obiju strana: njegovo naglašavanje ljubavi (...)
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  • The Embryo in Ancient Rabbinic Literature: Between Religious Law and Didactic Narratives: An Interpretive Essay.Etienne Lepicard - 2010 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 32 (1):21-41.
    At a time when bioethical issues are at the top of public and political agendas, there is a renewed interest in representations of the embryo in various religious traditions. One of the major traditions that have contributed to Western representations of the embryo is the Jewish tradition. This tradition poses some difficulties that may deter scholars, but also presents some invaluable advantages. These derive from two components, the search for limits and narrativity, both of which are directly connected with the (...)
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  • In What Sense Are Emotions Evaluations?Fabrice Teroni & Julien A. Deonna - 2014 - In Cain Todd & Sabine Roeser (eds.), Emotion and Value. Oxford University Press. pp. 15-31.
    In this chapter, we first introduce the idea that emotions are evaluations. Next, we explore two approaches attempting to account for this idea in terms of attitudes that are alleged to become emotional when taking evaluative contents. According to the first approach, emotions are evaluative judgments. According to the second, emotions are perceptual experiences of evaluative properties. We explain why this theory remains unsatisfactory insofar as it shares with the evaluative judgement theory the idea that emotions are evaluations in virtue (...)
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  • Arguing From Reception History for the Viability of Rational Reconstruction: A Case Study Involving The Reception of Cartesian Ethics in an Anglophone Context From 1650.Frits Gåvertsson - unknown
    I argue that Lisa Shapiro’s rational reconstruction of Descartes’s provisional moral code in terms of a broad conception of morality supplies us with an interpretative framework that make historiographical sense of the reception of Descartes’s moral philosophy in an Anglophone context on three occasions: the appeal to Descartes made by Henry More, Henry Sidgwick’s abrupt dismissal, and the ensuing reaction to Sidgwick found in Grace Neal Dolson. This case shows, I maintain, how reception history can be utilized to inform and (...)
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  • Ascensão E Discurso Em Plotino.Bernardo Guadalupe S. L. Brandão - 2014 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 55 (130):515-530.
    A concepção plotiniana de discurso é complexa e multi-facetada. Na "Enéada" I, 2, Plotino pensa o lógos prophorikós como uma imagem do lógos na alma. Na "Enéada" VI, 9, como um modo imperfeito de falar sobre o Um e um instrumento para exortar e instruir o filósofo no seu caminho de ascensão. Neste artigo, investigo quais são as relações entre discurso e ascensão da alma nas "Enéadas", tentando determinar quais são, de acordo com Plotino, as possibilidades e limites do discurso (...)
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  • Posidonius on Emotions and Non-Conceptual Content.Bill Wringe - 2011 - Prolegomena 10 (2):185-213.
    In this paper I argue that the work of the unorthodox Stoic Posidonius - as reported to us by Galen - can be seen as making an interesting contribution to contemporary debates about the nature of emotion. Richard Sorabji has already argued that Posidonius' contribution highlights the weaknesses in some well-known contemporary forms of cognitivism. Here I argue that Posidonius might be seen as advocating a theory of the emotions which sees them as being, in at least some cases, two-level (...)
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  • Tentativas sobre Montaigne: Horkheimer y la función del escepticismo.Vicente Raga Rosaleny - 2016 - Estudios de Filosofía (Universidad de Antioquia) 54:82-102.
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  • La Dimensión Cognitiva de Las Pasiones : La Vigencia de Aristóteles En la Psicología Moral Contemporánea = The Cognition of Passions : The Contemporary Relevance of the Aristotelian Thought in Moral Psychology.Diego S. Garrocho Salcedo - 2013 - Endoxa 31:15.
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  • Have We Vindicated the Motivational Unconscious Yet? A Conceptual Review.Alexandre Billon - 2011 - Frontiers in Psychoanalysis and Neuropsychoanalysis 2.
    Motivationally unconscious (M-unconscious) states are unconscious states that can directly motivate a subject’s behavior and whose unconscious character typically results from a form of repression. The basic argument for M-unconscious states claims that they provide the best explanation to some seemingly non rational behaviors, like akrasia, impulsivity or apparent self-deception. This basic argument has been challenged on theoretical, empirical and conceptual grounds. Drawing on recent works on apparent self-deception and on the ‘cognitive unconscious’ I assess those objections. I argue that (...)
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  • What's Philosophical About Moral Distress?Nancy J. Matchett - 2018 - Philosophical Practice: Journal of the American Philosophical Practitioners Association 2 (13):2108-19.
    Moral distress is a well-documented phenomenon in the nursing profession, and increasingly thought to be implicated in a nation-wide nursing shortage in the US. First identified by the philosopher Andrew Jameton in 1984, moral distress has also proven resistant to various attempts to prevent its occurrence or at least mitigate its effects. While this would seem to be bad news for nurses and their patients, it is potentially good news for philosophical counselors, for whom there is both socially important and (...)
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  • Fate, Chance, and Fortune in Ancient Thought.Stefano Maso - 2013 - Hakkert.
    The volume contains 11 contributions of the best experts on the topics of fate, fortune and free will, in reference to Ancient Philosophy: Plato, Aristotle, Stoicism, Epicureanism, Plotinus.
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  • Agency, Scarcity, and Mortality.Luca Ferrero - 2015 - The Journal of Ethics 19 (3-4):349-378.
    It is often argued, most recently by Samuel Scheffler, that we should reconcile with our mortality as constitutive of our existence: as essential to its temporal structure, to the nature of deliberation, and to our basic motivations and values. Against this reconciliatory strategy, I argue that there is a kind of immortal existence that is coherently conceivable and potentially desirable. First, I argue against the claim that our existence has a temporal structure with a trajectory that necessarily culminates in an (...)
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  • Moral Practice in Late Stoicism and Buddhist Meditation.Michael Goerger - 2017 - Comparative Philosophy 8 (1).
    I argue in this essay that Stoic philosophers in the late Greco-Roman period utilized philosophical exercises and spiritual technologies similar in form to a meditative exercise currently practiced in Buddhism. I begin with an in-depth discussion of moral development in the late Stoa, focusing particularly on their theories of cosmopolitanism and oikeiōsis. These theoretical commitments, I argue, necessitated the adoption of exercises and practices designed to guide practitioners toward the goal of universal moral concern. Using insights gained from Buddhist practice, (...)
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  • Imitation, Imagination and Re‐Appraisal: Educating the Moral Emotions.Bruce Maxwell & Roland Reichenbach - 2005 - Journal of Moral Education 34 (3):291-307.
    No observer of research currents in the human sciences can fail to detect a new appreciation for the contribution of emotions to descriptions of such wide?ranging psychological phenomena as moral judgement, personal and social development and learning. Despite this, we claim that educating the emotions as a dimension of moral education remains something of a taboo subject. As evidence for this, we present three categories of interventions that fit unmistakably into the category of the education of the emotions, but which (...)
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  • Health as Human Nature and Critique of Culture in Nietzsche and Zhuangzi.Danesh Singh - 2015 - Comparative Philosophy 6 (1):91-110.
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  • Epicurean Justice.John Armstrong - 1997 - Phronesis 42 (3):324-334.
    Epicurus is one of the first social contract theorists, holding that justice is an agreement neither to harm nor be harmed. He also says that living justly is necessary and sufficient for living pleasantly, which is the Epicurean goal. Some say that there are two accounts of justice in Epicurus -- one as a personal virtue, the other as a virtue of institutions. I argue that the personal virtue derives from compliance with just social institutions, and so we need to (...)
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  • Lucretius, Symmetry Arguments, and Fearing Death.James Warren - 2001 - Phronesis 46 (4):466-491.
    This paper identifies two possible versions of the Epicurean 'Symmetry argument', both of which claim that post mortem non-existence is relevantly like prenatal non-existence and that therefore our attitude to the former should be the same as that towards the latter. One version addresses the fear of the state of being dead by making it equivalent to the state of not yet being born; the other addresses the prospective fear of dying by relating it to our present retrospective attitude to (...)
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  • Heidegger: Being and Time and the Care for the Self.Jesús Adrián Escudero - 2013 - Open Journal of Philosophy 3 (2):302-307.
  • Lived Religion: Rethinking Human Nature in a Neoliberal Age.Beverley Clack - 2018 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 79 (4):355-369.
    ABSTRACTThis article considers the relationship between philosophy of religion and an approach to the study of religion, which prioritises the experience of lived religion. Considering how individuals and communities live out their faith challenges some of the assumptions of analytic philosophers of religion regarding the position the philosopher should adopt when approaching the investigation of religion. If philosophy is understood principally as a means for analysing belief, it will have little space for an engagement with what it feels like to (...)
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  • Greek Buddha: Pyrrho’s Encounter with Early Buddhism in Central Asia.Stephen Batchelor - 2016 - Contemporary Buddhism 17 (1):195-215.
    In his book Greek Buddha: Pyrrho’s Encounter with Early Buddhism in Central Asia, Christopher Beckwith argues that not only was the Buddha a Scythian from Central Asia, but that the earliest reliable record of Buddhist teaching is to be found in a text attributed to Pyrrho, the Greek founder of philosophical scepticism, cited by the third-century Christian bishop Eusebius. This review considers these claims in the light of epigraphical, textual and archaeological evidence. It then offers an alternative account of Pyrrho’s (...)
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  • Envy and Resentment.Marguerite La Caze - 2001 - Philosophical Explorations 4 (1):31-45.
    Envy and resentment are generally thought to be unpleasant and unethical emotions which ought to be condemned. I argue that both envy and resentment, in some important forms, are moral emotions connected with concern for justice, understood in terms of desert and entitlement. They enable us to recognise injustice, work as a spur to acting against it and connect us to others. Thus, we should accept these emotions as part of the ethical life.
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  • How Does One Know What Shame Is? Epistemology, Emotions, and Forms of Life in Juxtaposition.Ullaliina Lehtinen - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (1):56 - 77.
    Do women conceptualize-understand, know about, and react to-shame differently from the way men do? Does the experience and knowledge of shame have a gender-specificity, and along what lines could it be analyzed? By introducing a distinction between life or enduring experiences, "Erfahrung," and episodic or occurrent experiences, "Erlebnis," and by juxtaposing this distinction with the Rylean notion that knowledge is dispositional this paper argues for the plausibility of a gender-specificity.
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  • Learning From Seneca: A Stoic Perspective on the Art of Living and Education.Doret J. de Ruyter & Leendert F. Groenendijk - 2009 - Ethics and Education 4 (1):81-92.
    There is an increasing interest in publications about the sources of meaning in life; books about the art of living are immensely popular. This article discusses whether one of the ancient predecessors of current 'art of living' theories, the Stoa and more particularly Seneca, can be of interest to educators today. Seneca's explicit writings on education are relatively few, but in his letters to his friend Lucilius we find several ideas as to how educators can assist students to become wise (...)
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  • Epicurus, Death, and the Wrongness of Killing.Mikel Burley - 2010 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 53 (1):68-86.
    This article questions the assumption, held by several philosophers, that the Epicurean argument for death's being ?nothing to us? must be fallacious since its acceptance would undermine the principle that killing is (in general) wrong. Two possible strategies are considered, which the Epicurean-sympathizer might deploy in order to show that the non-badness of death (for the person who dies) is compatible with killing's being wrong. One of these is unsuccessful; the other is more promising. It involves arguing that the wrongness (...)
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  • Philosophy's Folds: Seneca, Cavarero, and the History of Rectitude.Victoria Rimell - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (4):768-783.
    This paper takes as its stimulus Adriana Cavarero’s recent investigation of the postures of rectitude and inclination in the Western philosophical tradition. To showcase how this book might catalyse productive interactions between feminist critics in different areas of the humanities, I will bring Cavarero into dialogue with a thinker she mentions in passing who extensively develops ‘rectitude as a general principle’ : Seneca. I argue that a gendered ontology of rectitude is increasingly put under pressure and transformed in Seneca’s Letters, (...)
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  • Essays in Moral Scepticism, by Richard Joyce.Kenneth Walden - 2019 - Mind 128 (511):935-944.
    Essays in Moral Scepticism, by JoyceRichard. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Pp. xi + 288.
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  • Justice as an Emotion Disposition.Robert C. Roberts - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (1):36-43.
    In this tribute to the work of Robert Solomon, I address a topic that occupied him frequently in the last 20 years of his life, and about which he wrote a book and several articles: the relation(s) between the emotions and justice as a personal virtue. I hope to clarify Solomon’s views using three distinctions that seem implicit in his writings, among (1) justice as general virtue and justice as a particular virtue, (2) objective justice and justice as a virtue, (...)
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  • Civic Ideology and the Problem of Difference: The Politics of Aeschylean Tragedy, Once Again.Simon Goldhill - 2000 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 120:34-56.
  • Narrative Reflection in the Philosophy of Teaching: Genealogies and Portraits.Hunter Mcewan - 2011 - Philosophy of Education 45 (1):125-140.
    How has philosophical reflection contributed to the ways that we think about teaching? In this paper I explore two forms of narrative reflection on teaching—genealogies and portraits. Genealogies tell a story about the origins of teaching; portraits find expression in myths and other narrative forms. I explore two genealogies of teaching—one deriving from the sophist, Protagoras, in which teaching is viewed as a technical skill employing methods of instruction; the other, deriving from Plato, in which teaching is seen fundamentally in (...)
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  • Heidegger and the Supposed Meaninglessness of Personal Immortality.Adam Buben - 2016 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 2 (3):384-399.
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  • Normativity, Realism and Emotional Experience.Michael-John Turp - forthcoming - Philosophia:1-18.
    Norms are standards against which actions, dispositions of mind and character, states of affairs and so forth can be measured. They also govern our behaviour, make claims on us, bind us and provide reasons for action and thought that motivate us. J. L. Mackie argued that the intrinsic prescriptivity, or to-be-pursuedness, of moral norms would make them utterly unlike anything else that we know of. Therefore, we should favour an error theory of morality. Mackie thought that the to-be-pursuedness would have (...)
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  • The Philosopher's Stone: A Response to Don Cupitt.George Myerson - 1998 - History of the Human Sciences 11 (3):131-136.
  • (Mis)Understanding Human Beings: Theory, Value, and Progress in Education Research.Karl Hostetler - 2010 - Educational Studies: Journal of the American Educational Studies Association 46 (4):400-415.
    There is renewed interest in what can be called an experimentist approach to education research. The claim is that if researchers would focus on experiments and evidence-based policies and practices, irreversible progress in education can be achieved. This experimentist approach cannot provide the understanding of knowledge and human beings needed for meaningful progress in education. Lacking is adequate appreciation for the role of theory, particularly ethical and other philosophical theory. We especially need a theory of our human condition and a (...)
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  • 'Delinquent'states, Guiltyconsciencesandhumanitarianpolitics in the 1990s.Chris Brown - 2008 - Journal of International Political Theory 4 (1):55-71.
    Notions such as ‘guilt’ and ‘forgiveness’ can be defined in objective terms, but more normally have an emotional dimension that cannot be experienced by the institutions examined in this collection of articles. Nevertheless, analogs to these emotions can be discerned in the behaviour of states – and exploring these reveals important insights into what are more effective ways of responding to, and making amends for, institutional failure. In the 1990s the Western powers were engaged in dealing with a sequence of (...)
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