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  1. The Congress for Cultural Freedom, Minerva, and the Quest for Instituting “Science Studies” in the Age of Cold War.Elena Aronova - 2012 - Minerva 50 (3):307-337.
    The Congress for Cultural Freedom is remembered as a paramount example of the “cultural cold wars.” In this paper, I discuss the ways in which this powerful transnational organization sought to promote “science studies” as a distinct – and politically relevant – area of expertise, and part of the CCF broader agenda to offer a renewed framework for liberalism. By means of its Study Groups, international conferences and its periodicals, such as Minerva, the Congress developed into an influential forum for (...)
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  • The Republic Vs. The Collective: Two Histories of Collaboration and Competition in Modern ScienceDie Republik Gegen Das Kollektiv: Zwei Geschichten von Kollaboration Und Konkurrenz in der Modernen Wissenschaft.Mary Jo Nye - 2016 - NTM Zeitschrift für Geschichte der Wissenschaften, Technik und Medizin 24 (2):169-194.
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  • Perception, Knowledge and Freedom in the Age of Extremes: On the Historical Epistemology of Ludwik Fleck and Michael Polanyi. [REVIEW]Michael Hagner - 2012 - Studies in East European Thought 64 (1-2):107-120.
    This paper deals with Ludwik Fleck’s theory of thought styles and Michael Polanyi’s theory of tacit knowledge. Though both concepts have been very influential for science studies in general, and both have been subject to numerous interpretations, their accounts have, somewhat surprisingly, hardly been comparatively analyzed. Both Fleck and Polanyi relied on the physiology and psychology of the senses in order to show that scientific knowledge follows less the path of logical principles than the path of accepting or rejecting specific (...)
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  • Anthropological Materials in the Making of Michael Polanyi’s Metascience.Struan Jacobs & Phil Mullins - 2017 - Perspectives on Science 25 (2):261-285.
    Anthropological discussions were important for Michael Polanyi in the middle phase of his intellectual career, in which he articulated in some detail his understanding of science, culture and society. This middle period commenced with his 1946 Riddell Memorial Lectures at Durham University in early 1946, published as Science, Faith and Society later that year, and extended through the publication of Personal Knowledge: Towards a Post-Critical Philosophy in 1958, based on Polanyi’s 1951 and 1952 Gifford Lectures. The Riddell Lectures gave Polanyi’s (...)
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  • The Young Shils.Stephen Turner - 2012 - Tradition and Discovery 39 (3):43-51.
    Edward Shils began as a sociologist under the close mentorship of Louis Wirth, with whom he collaborated on the translation of Karl Mannheim’s Ideology and Utopia. After 1940, however, Shils’ career, which had been focused on topics in sociology, notably the class and occupational structure of cities and on German Sociological Theory, took an apparent turn, which in 1946 led him into a relationship with Michael Polanyi, a half-time appointment at the London School of Economics, and a new intellectual direction. (...)
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  • Exploration and Exploitation in Scientific Inquiry: Towards a Society of Explorers.Roope Oskari Kaaronen - unknown
    This essay argues that scientific systems have two main functions typical to self-organising adaptive and complex systems: Exploration for and exploitation of information. The self-organising nature, or spontaneous order, of scientific systems was prominently conceived by polymath Michael Polanyi. Revisiting Polanyi’s philosophy of science reveals why scientific freedom is still today as important a value as ever, even though the notion of “freedom” itself must be revised. Namely, freedom of inquiry should serve to maintain a diverse and adaptive balance between (...)
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