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  1. Elisabeth, Princess of Bohemia.Lisa Shapiro - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • Ideas in the Mind: Gender and Knowledge in the Seventeenth Century. [REVIEW]Paula Findlen - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):183-196.
    “Neither doth our Sex delight or understand Philosophy.”.
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  • “Imperfect Discretion”: Interventions Into the History of Philosophy by Twentieth-Century French Women Philosophers.Penelope Deutscher - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (2):160-180.
    : How might we locate originality as emerging from within the "discrete" work of commentary? Because many women have engaged with philosophy in forms (including commentary) that preclude their work from being seen as properly "original," this question is a feminist issue. Via the work of selected contemporary French women philosophers, the author shows how commentary can reconfigure the philosophical tradition in innovative ways, as well as in ways that change what counts as philosophical innovation.
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  • Early Modern Women Philosophers and the History of Philosophy.Eileen O'Neill - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):185-197.
  • Elisabeth of Bohemia as a Naturalistic Dualist.Frederique Janssen-Lauret - 2018 - In Emily Thomas (ed.), Early Modern Women on Metaphysics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 171-187.
    Elisabeth was the first of Descartes' interlocutors to press concerns about mind-body union and interaction, and the only one to receive a detailed reply, unsatisfactory though she found it. Descartes took her tentative proposal `to concede matter and extension to the soul' for a confused version of his own view: `that is nothing but to conceive it united to the body. Contemporary commentators take Elisabeth for a materialist or at least a critic of dualism. I read her instead as a (...)
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  • Ideas in the Mind: Gender and Knowledge in the Seventeenth Century.Paula Findlen - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):183-196.
  • Early Modern Women Philosophers and the History of Philosophy.Eileen O'Neill - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):185-197.
  • “Imperfect Discretion”: Interventions Into the History of Philosophy by Twentieth-Century French Women Philosophers.Penelope Deutscher - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (2):160-180.
    How might we locate originality as emerging from within the “discrete” work of commentary? Because many women have engaged with philosophy informs that preclude their work from being seen as properly “original,” this question is a feminist issue. Via the work of selected contemporary French women philosophers, the author shows how commentary can reconfigure the philosophical tradition in innovative ways, as well as in ways that change what counts as philosophical innovation.
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  • Updating Syllabi, Reimagining Assignments, and Embracing Error: Strategies for Retaining Marginalized Students in Philosophy.Monique Whitaker - 2015 - American Association of Philosophy Teachers Studies in Pedagogy 1:3–16.
    One of the significant problems for philosophy’s development into a more diverse discipline is the familiar sharp reduction in the proportion of women and students of color after initial, introductory-level courses. This contributes to a lack in the breadth of perspective and experience that both upper-level students and faculty bring to philosophy, which in turn undermines the strength of the discipline as a whole. Much of the transformation of philosophy must necessarily happen at the departmental, and even university, level; but (...)
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