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  1. Analogy Lays the Foundation for Two Crucial Aspects of Symbolic Development: Intention and Correspondence.Lei Yuan & David H. Uttal - 2017 - Topics in Cognitive Science 9 (3):738-757.
    We argue that analogical reasoning, particularly Gentner's structure-mapping theory, provides an integrative theoretical framework through which we can better understand the development of symbol use. Analogical reasoning can contribute both to the understanding of others’ intentions and the establishment of correspondences between symbols and their referents, two crucial components of symbolic understanding. We review relevant research on the development of symbolic representations, intentionality, comparison, and similarity, and demonstrate how structure-mapping theory can shed light on several ostensibly disparate findings in the (...)
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  • Japanese Sound-Symbolic Words for Representing the Hardness of an Object Are Judged Similarly by Japanese and English Speakers.Li Shan Wong, Jinhwan Kwon, Zane Zheng, Suzy J. Styles, Maki Sakamoto & Ryo Kitada - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Contrary to the assumption of arbitrariness in modern linguistics, sound symbolism, which is the non-arbitrary relationship between sounds and meanings, exists. Sound symbolism, including the “Bouba–Kiki” effect, implies the universality of such relationships; individuals from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds can similarly relate sound-symbolic words to referents, although the extent of these similarities remains to be fully understood. Here, we examined if subjects from different countries could similarly infer the surface texture properties from words that sound-symbolically represent hardness in Japanese. (...)
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  • Iconicity in Ideophones: Guessing, Memorizing, and Reassessing.Thomas Van Hoey, Arthur L. Thompson, Youngah Do & Mark Dingemanse - 2023 - Cognitive Science 47 (4):e13268.
    Iconicity, or the resemblance between form and meaning, is often ascribed to a special status and contrasted with default assumptions of arbitrariness in spoken language. But does iconicity in spoken language have a special status when it comes to learnability? A simple way to gauge learnability is to see how well something is retrieved from memory. We can further contrast this with guessability, to see (1) whether the ease of guessing the meanings of ideophones outperforms the rate at which they (...)
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  • Consistent verbal labels promote odor category learning.Norbert Vanek, Márton Sóskuthy & Asifa Majid - 2021 - Cognition 206 (C):104485.
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  • Phonological Iconicity Electrifies: An ERP Study on Affective Sound-to-Meaning Correspondences in German.Susann Ullrich, Sonja A. Kotz, David S. Schmidtke, Arash Aryani & Markus Conrad - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • The Specificity of Sound Symbolic Correspondences in Spoken Language.Christina Y. Tzeng, Lynne C. Nygaard & Laura L. Namy - 2017 - Cognitive Science:2191-2220.
    Although language has long been regarded as a primarily arbitrary system, sound symbolism, or non-arbitrary correspondences between the sound of a word and its meaning, also exists in natural language. Previous research suggests that listeners are sensitive to sound symbolism. However, little is known about the specificity of these mappings. This study investigated whether sound symbolic properties correspond to specific meanings, or whether these properties generalize across semantic dimensions. In three experiments, native English-speaking adults heard sound symbolic foreign words for (...)
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  • Onomatopoeia, translation and relevance.Ryoko Sasamoto - 2021 - Pragmatics and Cognition 28 (2):347-375.
    It is generally acknowledged that onomatopoeia poses challenges for translation. However, there is little research into the translation of onomatopoeia in Pragmatics. This study seeks to examine the nature of onomatopoeia and its implications for translation from the perspective of relevance theory, addressing, in particular, the following questions: Can notions from pragmatics help to account for the perceived challenges involved in translating onomatopoeia? Would the showing-meaning nature affect the translation of onomatopoeia? What other factors result in difficulties in translating onomatopoeia (...)
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  • Non‐Arbitrariness in Mapping Word Form to Meaning: Cross‐Linguistic Formal Markers of Word Concreteness.Jamie Reilly, Jinyi Hung & Chris Westbury - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (4):1071-1089.
    Arbitrary symbolism is a linguistic doctrine that predicts an orthogonal relationship between word forms and their corresponding meanings. Recent corpora analyses have demonstrated violations of arbitrary symbolism with respect to concreteness, a variable characterizing the sensorimotor salience of a word. In addition to qualitative semantic differences, abstract and concrete words are also marked by distinct morphophonological structures such as length and morphological complexity. Native English speakers show sensitivity to these markers in tasks such as auditory word recognition and naming. One (...)
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  • The sound of distance.Cristina D. Rabaglia, Sam J. Maglio, Madelaine Krehm, Jin H. Seok & Yaacov Trope - 2016 - Cognition 152:141-149.
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  • Iconicity and Sign Lexical Acquisition: A Review.Gerardo Ortega - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • Verbal labels facilitate tactile perception.Tally McCormick Miller, Timo Torsten Schmidt, Felix Blankenburg & Friedemann Pulvermüller - 2018 - Cognition 171 (C):172-179.
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  • “I use it when I see it”: The role of development and experience in Deaf and hearing children’s understanding of iconic gesture.Rachel W. Magid & Jennie E. Pyers - 2017 - Cognition 162 (C):73-86.
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  • Iconicity in the lab: a review of behavioral, developmental, and neuroimaging research into sound-symbolism.Gwilym Lockwood & Mark Dingemanse - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6:1-14.
    This review covers experimental approaches to sound-symbolism—from infants to adults, and from Sapir’s foundational studies to twenty-first century product naming. It synthesizes recent behavioral, developmental, and neuroimaging work into a systematic overview of the cross-modal correspondences that underpin iconic links between form and meaning. It also identifies open questions and opportunities, showing how the future course of experimental iconicity research can benefit from an integrated interdisciplinary perspective. Combining insights from psychology and neuroscience with evidence from natural languages provides us with (...)
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  • Stimulus Parameters Underlying Sound‐Symbolic Mapping of Auditory Pseudowords to Visual Shapes.Simon Lacey, Yaseen Jamal, Sara M. List, K. Sathian & Lynne C. Nygaard - 2020 - Cognitive Science 44 (9):e12883.
    Sound symbolism refers to non‐arbitrary mappings between the sounds of words and their meanings and is often studied by pairing auditory pseudowords such as “maluma” and “takete” with rounded and pointed visual shapes, respectively. However, it is unclear what auditory properties of pseudowords contribute to their perception as rounded or pointed. Here, we compared perceptual ratings of the roundedness/pointedness of large sets of pseudowords and shapes to their acoustic and visual properties using a novel application of representational similarity analysis (RSA). (...)
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  • Japanese Sound-Symbolism Facilitates Word Learning in English-Speaking Children.Katerina Kantartzis, Mutsumi Imai & Sotaro Kita - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (3):575-586.
    Sound-symbolism is the nonarbitrary link between the sound and meaning of a word. Japanese-speaking children performed better in a verb generalization task when they were taught novel sound-symbolic verbs, created based on existing Japanese sound-symbolic words, than novel nonsound-symbolic verbs (Imai, Kita, Nagumo, & Okada, 2008). A question remained as to whether the Japanese children had picked up regularities in the Japanese sound-symbolic lexicon or were sensitive to universal sound-symbolism. The present study aimed to provide support for the latter. In (...)
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  • Bevissthet.Mette Kristine Hansen - 2020 - Norsk Filosofisk Tidsskrift 55 (4):253-268.
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  • Gesture, sign, and language: The coming of age of sign language and gesture studies.Susan Goldin-Meadow & Diane Brentari - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40:1-82.
    How does sign language compare with gesture, on the one hand, and spoken language on the other? Sign was once viewed as nothing more than a system of pictorial gestures without linguistic structure. More recently, researchers have argued that sign is no different from spoken language, with all of the same linguistic structures. The pendulum is currently swinging back toward the view that sign is gestural, or at least has gestural components. The goal of this review is to elucidate the (...)
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  • Words cluster phonetically beyond phonotactic regularities.Isabelle Dautriche, Kyle Mahowald, Edward Gibson, Anne Christophe & Steven T. Piantadosi - 2017 - Cognition 163 (C):128-145.
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  • Guessing Meaning From Word Sounds of Unfamiliar Languages: A Cross-Cultural Sound Symbolism Study.Anita D’Anselmo, Giulia Prete, Przemysław Zdybek, Luca Tommasi & Alfredo Brancucci - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • The Cultural Evolution of Structured Languages in an Open‐Ended, Continuous World.W. Carr Jon, Smith Kenny, Cornish Hannah & Kirby Simon - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (4):892-923.
    Language maps signals onto meanings through the use of two distinct types of structure. First, the space of meanings is discretized into categories that are shared by all users of the language. Second, the signals employed by the language are compositional: The meaning of the whole is a function of its parts and the way in which those parts are combined. In three iterated learning experiments using a vast, continuous, open-ended meaning space, we explore the conditions under which both structured (...)
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  • Simplicity and informativeness in semantic category systems.Jon W. Carr, Kenny Smith, Jennifer Culbertson & Simon Kirby - 2020 - Cognition 202 (C):104289.
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  • The Changing Role of Sound‐Symbolism for Small Versus Large Vocabularies.James Brand, Padraic Monaghan & Peter Walker - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (S2):578-590.
    Natural language contains many examples of sound-symbolism, where the form of the word carries information about its meaning. Such systematicity is more prevalent in the words children acquire first, but arbitrariness dominates during later vocabulary development. Furthermore, systematicity appears to promote learning category distinctions, which may become more important as the vocabulary grows. In this study, we tested the relative costs and benefits of sound-symbolism for word learning as vocabulary size varies. Participants learned form-meaning mappings for words which were either (...)
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  • Sound symbolism in sighted and blind. The role of vision and orthography in sound-shape correspondences.Roberto Bottini, Marco Barilari & Olivier Collignon - 2019 - Cognition 185 (C):62-70.
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  • What is the link between synaesthesia and sound symbolism?Kaitlyn Bankieris & Julia Simner - 2015 - Cognition 136 (C):186-195.
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  • Sound Predicts Meaning: Cross‐Modal Associations Between Formant Frequency and Emotional Tone in Stanzas.Jan Auracher, Winfried Menninghaus & Mathias Scharinger - 2020 - Cognitive Science 44 (10):e12906.
    Research on the relation between sound and meaning in language has reported substantial evidence for implicit associations between articulatory–acoustic characteristics of phonemes and emotions. In the present study, we specifically tested the relation between the acoustic properties of a text and its emotional tone as perceived by readers. To this end, we asked participants to assess the emotional tone of single stanzas extracted from a large variety of poems. The selected stanzas had either an extremely high, a neutral, or an (...)
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