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  1. Communicative Context Affects Use of Referential Prosody.Christina Y. Tzeng, Laura L. Namy & Lynne C. Nygaard - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (11):e12799.
    The current study assessed the extent to which the use of referential prosody varies with communicative demand. Speaker–listener dyads completed a referential communication task during which speakers attempted to indicate one of two color swatches (one bright, one dark) to listeners. Speakers' bright sentences were reliably higher pitched than dark sentences for ambiguous (e.g., bright red versus dark red) but not unambiguous (e.g., bright red versus dark purple) trials, suggesting that speakers produced meaningful acoustic cues to brightness when the accompanying (...)
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  • Iconic Prosody in Story Reading.Marcus Perlman, Nathaniel Clark & Marlene Johansson Falck - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (6):1348-1368.
    Recent experiments have shown that people iconically modulate their prosody corresponding with the meaning of their utterance. This article reports findings from a story reading task that expands the investigation of iconic prosody to abstract meanings in addition to concrete ones. Participants read stories that contrasted along concrete and abstract semantic dimensions of speed and size. Participants read fast stories at a faster rate than slow stories, and big stories with a lower pitch than small stories. The effect of speed (...)
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  • Sound to meaning correspondences facilitate word learning.Lynne C. Nygaard, Allison E. Cook & Laura L. Namy - 2009 - Cognition 112 (1):181-186.
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  • Perceptual-motor constraints on sound-to-meaning correspondence in language.Laura L. Namy & Lynne C. Nygaard - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):528-529.
    The proposal that language has evolved to conform to general cognitive and learning constraints inherent in the human brain calls for specification of these mechanisms. We propose that just as cognition appears to be grounded in cross-modal perceptual-motor capabilities, so too must language. Evidence for perceptual-motor grounding comes from non-arbitrary sound-to-meaning correspondences and their role in word learning.
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  • Iconicity in the lab: a review of behavioral, developmental, and neuroimaging research into sound-symbolism.Gwilym Lockwood & Mark Dingemanse - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6:1-14.
    This review covers experimental approaches to sound-symbolism—from infants to adults, and from Sapir’s foundational studies to twenty-first century product naming. It synthesizes recent behavioral, developmental, and neuroimaging work into a systematic overview of the cross-modal correspondences that underpin iconic links between form and meaning. It also identifies open questions and opportunities, showing how the future course of experimental iconicity research can benefit from an integrated interdisciplinary perspective. Combining insights from psychology and neuroscience with evidence from natural languages provides us with (...)
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  • Stimulus Parameters Underlying Sound‐Symbolic Mapping of Auditory Pseudowords to Visual Shapes.Simon Lacey, Yaseen Jamal, Sara M. List, K. Sathian & Lynne C. Nygaard - 2020 - Cognitive Science 44 (9):e12883.
    Sound symbolism refers to non‐arbitrary mappings between the sounds of words and their meanings and is often studied by pairing auditory pseudowords such as “maluma” and “takete” with rounded and pointed visual shapes, respectively. However, it is unclear what auditory properties of pseudowords contribute to their perception as rounded or pointed. Here, we compared perceptual ratings of the roundedness/pointedness of large sets of pseudowords and shapes to their acoustic and visual properties using a novel application of representational similarity analysis (RSA). (...)
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  • Gesture, sign, and language: The coming of age of sign language and gesture studies.Susan Goldin-Meadow & Diane Brentari - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40:1-82.
    How does sign language compare with gesture, on the one hand, and spoken language on the other? Sign was once viewed as nothing more than a system of pictorial gestures without linguistic structure. More recently, researchers have argued that sign is no different from spoken language, with all of the same linguistic structures. The pendulum is currently swinging back toward the view that sign is gestural, or at least has gestural components. The goal of this review is to elucidate the (...)
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  • More than words : evidence for a Stroop effect of prosody in emotion word processing.Piera Filippi, Sebastian Ocklenburg, Daniel L. Bowling, Larissa Heege, Onur Güntürkün, Albert Newen & Bart de Boer - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (5):879-891.
  • Semantic and prosodic threat processing in trait anxiety: is repetitive thinking influencing responses?Simon Busch-Moreno, Jyrki Tuomainen & David Vinson - forthcoming - Tandf: Cognition and Emotion:1-21.
  • Semantic and prosodic threat processing in trait anxiety: is repetitive thinking influencing responses?Simon Busch-Moreno, Jyrki Tuomainen & David Vinson - 2021 - Cognition and Emotion 35 (1):50-70.
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  • A Joint Prosodic Origin of Language and Music.Steven Brown - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
  • Sound Predicts Meaning: Cross‐Modal Associations Between Formant Frequency and Emotional Tone in Stanzas.Jan Auracher, Winfried Menninghaus & Mathias Scharinger - 2020 - Cognitive Science 44 (10):e12906.
    Research on the relation between sound and meaning in language has reported substantial evidence for implicit associations between articulatory–acoustic characteristics of phonemes and emotions. In the present study, we specifically tested the relation between the acoustic properties of a text and its emotional tone as perceived by readers. To this end, we asked participants to assess the emotional tone of single stanzas extracted from a large variety of poems. The selected stanzas had either an extremely high, a neutral, or an (...)
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  • Phonation Types Matter in Sound Symbolism.Kimi Akita - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (5):e12982.
    Sound symbolism is a non‐arbitrary correspondence between sound and meaning. The majority of studies on sound symbolism have focused on consonants and vowels, and the sound‐symbolic properties of suprasegmentals, particularly phonation types, have been largely neglected. This study examines the size and shape symbolism of four phonation types: modal and creaky voices, falsetto, and whisper. Japanese speakers heard 12 novel words (e.g., /íbi/, /ápa/) pronounced with the four types of phonation and rated the size and roundedness/pointedness each of the 48 (...)
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