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  1. The Gift of an Interval: Michael Oakeshott's Idea of a University Education.Kevin Williams - 1989 - British Journal of Educational Studies 37 (4):384-397.
  • Training and Mastery of Techniques in Wittgenstein's Later Philosophy: A Response to Michael Luntley.Jeff Stickney - 2008 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (5):678-694.
    Responding to Michael Luntley's article, ‘Learning, Empowerment and Judgement’, the author shows he cannot successfully make the following three moves: dissolve the analytic distinction between learning by training and learning by reasoning, while advocating the latter; diminish the role of training in Wittgenstein's philosophy, nor attribute to him a rationalist model of learning; and turn to empirical research as a way of solving the philosophical problems he addresses through Wittgenstein. Drawing on José Medina's analysis of the fundamental role of training (...)
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  • The Idea of the University in the 21st Century: A British Perspective.Peter Scott - 1993 - British Journal of Educational Studies 41 (1):4 - 25.
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  • Teaching and Truthfulness.David E. Cooper - 2008 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 27 (2-3):79-87.
    Some tendencies in modern education—the stress on ‘performativity’, for instance, and ‘celebration of difference’—threaten the value traditionally placed on truthful teaching. In this paper, truthfulness is mainly understood, following Bernard Williams, as a disposition to ‘Accuracy’ and ‘Sincerity’—hence as a virtue. It is to be distinguished from truth, and current debates about the nature of truth are not relevant to the issue of the value of truthfulness. This issue devolves into the question of whether truthfulness is a distinctive virtue of (...)
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  • Education as Dialogue.Tasos Kazepides - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (9):913-925.
    The purpose of this paper is to show that genuine dialogue is a refined human achievement and probably the most valid criterion on the basis of which we can evaluate educational or social policy and practice. The paper explores the prerequisites of dialogue in the language games, the common certainties, the rules of logic and the variety of common virtues; defends dialogue as a normative concept and interprets the principles of dialogue as extensions of its prerequisite virtues. Finally, it examines (...)
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  • What is Critical About Critical Pedagogy? Conflicting Conceptions of Criticism in the Curriculum.Hanan A. Alexander - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (10):903-916.
    In this paper, I explore the problems of cultivating a critical attitude in pedagogy given problems with accounts grounded in critical social theory, rational liberalism and pragmatic esthetic theory. I offer instead an alternative account of criticism for education in open, pluralistic, liberal, democratic societies called 'pedagogy of difference' that is grounded in the diversity liberalism of Isaiah Berlin and the dialogical philosophy of Martin Buber. In our current condition in which there is no agreement as to the proper criteria (...)
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  • Schooling as a Journey in Humanization.Douglas Stewart - 2000 - Paideusis: Journal of the Canadian Philosophy of Education Society 13 (2):5-22.
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  • Assessing Virtue: Measurement in Moral Education at Home and Abroad.Hanan A. Alexander - 2016 - Ethics and Education 11 (3):310-325.
    How should we assess programs dedicated to education in virtue? One influential answer draws on quantitative research designs. By measuring the inputs and processes that produce the highest levels of virtue among participants according to some reasonable criterion, in this view, we can determine which programs engender the most desired results. Although many outcomes of character education can undoubtedly be assessed in this way, taken on its own, this approach may support favorable judgments about programs that indoctrinate rather than educate, (...)
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  • A Critique of Science Education as Sociopolitical Action From the Perspective of Liberal Education.Yannis Hadzigeorgiou - 2015 - Science & Education 24 (3):259-280.
    This paper outlines the rationale underpinning the conception of science education as sociopolitical action, and then presents a critique of such a conception from the perspective of liberal education. More specifically, the paper discusses the importance of the conception of science education as sociopolitical action and then raises questions about the content of school science, about the place and value of scientific inquiry, and about the opportunities students have for self-directed inquiry. The central idea behind the critique is that a (...)
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  • Neoliberal Education for Work Versus Liberal Education for Leisure.Kevin Gary - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (1):83-94.
    My concern in this essay is not so much with the invisible work or hidden labor produced by neoliberalism, but rather with what Joseph Pieper describes as an emerging culture of “total work”. More than the sheer number of hours of work, Pieper diagnoses a transformation in the way we view work. Work has become the exclusive point of reference for how we see and define ourselves. We are, Pieper feared, increasingly incapable of seeing beyond the working self. The human (...)
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  • Rawls, Sartre, and the Question of Camaraderie.René V. Arcilla - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (5):491-502.
    In his classic text, A Theory of Justice, John Rawls argues that the structural principles of a society are just when they issue from a procedure that is fair. One crucial feature that makes the procedure fair is that the persons who will be subjected to these principles choose them after they have deliberated together in a condition marked by a certain balance of knowledge and ignorance. In particular, these people know enough to consider principles that are workable, yet converse (...)
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  • Fusing Philosophy and Fieldwork in a Study of Being a Person in the World: An Interim Commentary.David T. Hansen, Jason Thomas Wozniak & Ana Cecilia Galindo Diego - 2015 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (2):159-170.
    In this article, we describe a longitudinal inquiry into what it means to be a person in our contemporary world. Our method constitutes a dynamic, non-objectifying fusion of empirical and philosophical anthropology. Field-based anthropology examines actualities: how people lead their lives and talk about them. Philosophical anthropology addresses possibilities: who and what people could become in light of actualities while not being determined by them. We describe and illustrate our fieldwork in the classrooms of 16 teachers who work in New (...)
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  • Special Issue of Cosmos + Taxis: Oakeshott.Leslie Marsh - 2014 - Cosmos + Taxis 1 (3).
  • Trade-Offs, Backfires, and Curricular Diversification.Ian James Kidd - 2020 - Symposion. Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 7 (2):179-193.
    Ian James Kidd ABSTRACT: This paper presents two challenges faced by many initiatives that try to diversify undergraduate philosophy curricula, both intellectually and demographically. Trade-offs involve making difficult decisions to prioritise some values over others. Backfires involve unintended consequences contrary to the aims and values of diversity initiatives, including ….
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  • ‘The Politics of Faith and the Politics of Scepticism’: Michael Oakeshott, Education and Extremism.Ian Frowe - 2007 - British Journal of Educational Studies 55 (3):264-285.
    This paper considers a distinction between two types of politics developed by Michael Oakeshott in his book The Politics of Faith and the Politics of Scepticism and argues that the theoretical framework proposed supplies an illuminating and productive perspective for examining the notion of political extremism. These positions are linked to two other important aspects of his work, namely his account of 'enterprise' and 'civil' association and his differentiation between abstract philosophical entities and concrete political situations. There is also a (...)
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  • ‘The Politics of Faith and the Politics of Scepticism’: Michael Oakeshott, Education and Extremism.Ian Frowe - 2007 - British Journal of Educational Studies 55 (3):264 - 285.
    This paper considers a distinction between two types of politics developed by Michael Oakeshott in his book The Politics of Faith and the Politics of Scepticism (1996) and argues that the theoretical framework proposed supplies an illuminating and productive perspective for examining the notion of political extremism. These positions are linked to two other important aspects of his work, namely his account of 'enterprise' and 'civil' association and his differentiation between abstract philosophical entities and concrete political situations. There is also (...)
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  • Themed Issue on Oakeshott.Gene Callahan & Leslie Marsh - 2014 - Cosmos + Taxis 1 (3).
  • Teachers in Retreat: The Teacher as a Dialogical Self and the Risks of an Excessive Formalization of its Role.Anna Llongueras-Aparicio & Juan Antonio Casas-Pardo - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (10):1042-1050.
    The aim of this paper is to explore the identity of the teacher as a dialectical being that is in permanent construction, to identify some obstacles teachers might find in this process while operating in an institutional framework, and the effects these could have upon the teacher and the goals she pursues with her students. By ruling out the idea of identity as an autonomous self that can be constructed with no ties with its context, we propose that identity is (...)
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  • Beyond the Reflective Teacher.Terence H. McLaughlin - 1999 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 31 (1):9–25.
  • Professional Trust.Ian Frowe - 2005 - British Journal of Educational Studies 53 (1):34-53.
    This paper examines the concept of 'professional trust' and argues that trust is an essential component of what it means to be a 'professional'. The first part of the paper discusses the nature of trust in general and attempts to establish two main points: that we are all involved in relationships of trust and that all trust involves risk. The second section examines the idea of professional trust and draws on an analysis of knowledge provided by Michael Oakeshott that divides (...)
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  • Menaces of Liberal Education: M. Oakeshott.Dana Tabrea - 2012 - Meta: Research in Hermeneutics, Phenomenology, and Practical Philosophy 4 (1):73-87.
    In the present text I discuss Michael Oakeshott’s idea of liberal education and its main menace, authority. By identifying two ways of examining the issue of authority, I launch two different perspectives on this issue. The first one is abstract and it considers an early Oakeshottian essay and Gadamer’s rehabilitation of tradition, and allows me to formulate the following thesis: conversation precedes education. The second perspective is an application, and its concreteness allows me to employ the concept of authority in (...)
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  • The Gift of an Interval: Michael Oakeshott's Idea of a University Education.Kevin Williams - 1989 - British Journal of Educational Studies 37 (4):384-397.
  • The Idea of the University in the 21st Century: A British Perspective.Peter Scott - 1993 - British Journal of Educational Studies 41 (1):4-25.
  • Revisiting the Liberal and Vocational Dimensions of University Education.David Carr - 2009 - British Journal of Educational Studies 57 (1):1-17.
    The purposes of higher education in general and of university education in particular have long been subject to controversy. Whereas for some, the main role of universities is to provide professional and vocational education and training and their benefits are to be measured in terms of social or economic utility, their value for others is to be seen more in terms of the liberal development and promotion of certain intrinsically worthwhile qualities of mind and intellect. In this context, indeed, much (...)
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  • Why the Aims of Education Cannot Be Settled.Atli Harðarson - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (2):223-235.
    The dominant model of curriculum design in the last century assumed that school education could be organized around aims, defined primarily in terms of students' behaviour. The credentials of this model were questioned by, among others, Lawrence Stenhouse, who pointed out that education serves purposes that cannot be stated in terms of behavioural objectives. In this article, I offer support for Stenhouse's conclusion and go beyond it, showing that if education aims at critical understanding of its own value, then it (...)
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  • Is There A Universal Right To Higher Education?Tristan McCowan - 2012 - British Journal of Educational Studies 60 (2):111-128.
    Opposition to university fees is often framed as a defence of higher education as a 'right' rather than a 'privilege'. However, the basis and nature of this right is unclear. This article presents a conceptual exploration of the question, drawing on an initial analysis of international law. An argument is put forward for a right to higher education seen as one of a number of possible forms of post-school education, restricted only by a requirement for a minimum level of academic (...)
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  • Feyerabend on Science and Education.Ian James Kidd - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (3):407-422.
    This article offers a sympathetic interpretation of Paul Feyerabend's remarks on science and education. I present a formative episode in the development of his educational ideas—the ‘Berkeley experience'—and describe how it affected his views on the place of science within modern education. It emerges that Feyerabend arrived at a conception of education closely related to that of Michael Oakeshott and Martin Heidegger—that of education as ‘releasement’. Each of those three figures argued that the purpose of education was not to induct (...)
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  • The Educative Importance of Ethos.Terence McLaughlin - 2005 - British Journal of Educational Studies 53 (3):306-325.
    This article explores the educative importance of ethos from a broadly philosophical perspective. It is argued that, for a range of reasons, the notion of ethos in the context of education needs to be brought into clearer focus. An analysis is offered of the concept of ethos, with particular reference to the context of classrooms and schools. The educative importance of ethos is explored, with reference to a range of difficulties and challenges which it presents.
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  • What is Common About Common Schooling? Rational Autonomy and Moral Agency in Liberal Democratic Education.Hanan Alexander - 2007 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (4):609–624.
  • Oakeshott on the Character of Religious Experience: Need There Be a Conflict Between Science and Religion?Timothy Fuller - 2009 - Zygon 44 (1):153-167.
    Michael Oakeshott reflected on the character of religious experience in various writings throughout his life. In Experience and Its Modes (1933) he analyzed science as a distinctive "mode," or account of experience as a whole, identifying those assumptions necessary for science to achieve its coherent account of experience in contrast to other modes of experience whose quests for coherence depend on different assumptions. Religious experience, he thought, was integral to the practical mode. The latter experiences the world as interminable tension (...)
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  • Political Education in/as the Practice of Freedom: A Paradoxical Defence From the Perspective of Michael Oakeshott.Stephen M. Engel - 2007 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (3):325–349.
    Creating education systems that promote democratic sustainability has been the concern of political thinkers as diverse as J. S. Mill, Dewey, Benjamin Barber and Derek Bok. The classic dichotomisation of democratic theory between deliberative democrats and Schumpeterian democrats suggests that education in the service of democracy can be constructive—that is, provide a student with the skills necessary to elect her leaders without changing her nature—or reconstructive—that is, fundamentally and radically reshape the student to produce a citizen whose goals are transformed (...)
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  • Must New Worlds Also Be Good?Robert Grant - 1995 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 38 (1-2):123 – 141.
    The activities analysed by Spinosa et al., viz entrepreneurship, citizen action, and cultural leadership, are all central to the American experience. They have a common phenomenological structure and a common purpose, which is to ?disclose new worlds?, i.e. so to reconfigure the collective perceptions as to bring about ?large?scale cultural and historical changes?. Each, more or less unselfconsciously, is an exercise of skill, an expression of freedom, and a building of solidarity through the recovery or discovery of human meanings. I (...)
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  • The Common School.Richard Pring - 2007 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (4):503–522.