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Gilles Deleuze and the Ruin of Representation

University of California Press (1999)

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  1. Representation and the Straightjacketing of Curriculum's Complicated Conversation: The Pedagogy of Pontypool's Minor Language.Jason James Wallin - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (4):366-385.
    Reconceptualist and post‐reconceptualist curriculum scholars have drawn upon the notion of a complicated curriculum conversation as a means to describe the imbricated, pluralist, and eclectic character of curriculum theorizing. Insofar as this curriculum conversation is accomplished via language however, it remains wed to a particular representational logic restricting what might be thought. This essay explores the question of what it means to theorize curriculum when the very idea of a complicated curriculum conversation begins to fall into cliché. Mobilizing the philosophical (...)
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  • Making Different Differences: Representation and Rights in Sexuality Activism.Kay Lalor - 2015 - Feminist Legal Studies 23 (1):7-25.
    This paper argues that current iterations of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex rights are limited by an overreliance on particular representations of sexuality, in which homosexuality is defined negatively through a binary of homosexual/heterosexual. The limits of these representations are explored in order to unpick the possibility of engaging in a form of sexuality politics that is grounded in difference rather than in sameness or opposition. The paper seeks to respond to Braidotti’s call for an “affirmative politics” that is (...)
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  • Book Review: Elizabeth Grosz. The Nick of Time: Politics, Evolution, and the Untimely and Time Travels: Feminism, Nature, Power. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2005. [REVIEW]Dorothea Olkowski - 2001 - Hypatia 21 (4):212-221.
  • Interval, Sexual Difference: Luce Irigaray and Henri Bergson.Rebecca Hill - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (1):119-131.
    : Henri Bergson's philosophy has attracted increasing feminist attention in recent years as a fruitful locus for re-theorizing temporality. Drawing on Luce Irigaray's well-known critical description of metaphysics as phallocentrism, Hill argues that Bergson's deduction of duration is predicated upon the disavowal of a sexed hierarchy. She concludes the article by proposing a way to move beyond Bergson's phallocentrism to articulate duration as a sensible and transcendental difference that articulates a nonhierarchical qualitative relation between the sexes.
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  • The End of Phenomenology: Bergson's Interval in Irigaray.Dorothea E. Olkowski - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (3):73-91.
    : Luce Irigaray is often cited as the principle feminist who adheres to phenomenology as a method of descriptive philosophy. A different approach to Irigaray might well open the way to not only an avoidance of phenomenology's sexist tendencies, but the recognition that the breach between Irigaray's ideas and those of phenomenology is complete. I argue that this occurs and that Irigaray's work directly implicates a Bergsonian critique of the limits of phenomenology.
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  • Aesthetics, Affect, and Educational Politics.Alex Means - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (10):1088-1102.
    This essay explores aesthetics, affect, and educational politics through the thought of Gilles Deleuze and Jacques Rancière. It contextualizes and contrasts the theoretical valences of their ethical and democratic projects through their shared critique of Kant. It then puts Rancière's notion of dissensus to work by exploring it in relation to a social movement and hunger strike organized for educational justice in Chicago's Little Village neighborhood. This serves as a context for understanding how educational provisions are linked to the aesthetic (...)
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  • “A Different Starting Point, a Different Metaphysics”: Reading Bergson and Barad Diffractively.Iris Van Der Tuin - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (1):22-42.
    This article provides an affirmative feminist reading of the philosophy of Henri Bergson by reading it through the work of Karen Barad. Adopting such a diffractive reading strategy enables feminist philosophy to move beyond discarding Bergson for his apparent phallocentrism. Feminist philosophy finds itself double bound when it critiques a philosophy for being phallocentric, because the setup of a master narrative comes into being with the critique. By negating a gender-blind or sexist philosophy, feminist philosophy only reaffirms its parameters, and (...)
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  • Changing Planes: Rhizosemiotic Play in Transnational Curriculum Inquiry.Noel Gough - 2007 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 26 (3):279-294.
    This essay juxtaposes concepts created by Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari with worlds imagined by Ursula Le Guin in a performance of ‘rhizosemiotic play’ that explores some possible ways of generating and sustaining what William Pinar calls ‘complicated conversation’ within the regime of signs that constitutes an increasingly internationalized curriculum field. Deleuze and Guattari analyze thinking as flows or movements across space. They argue, for example, that every mode of intellectual inquiry needs to account for the plane of immanence upon (...)
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  • Gilles Deleuze and Michel Henry: Critical Contrasts in the Deduction of Life as Transcendental.James Williams - 2008 - Sophia 47 (3):265-279.
    To address the theological turn in phenomenology, this paper sets out critical arguments opposing the theist phenomenology of Michel Henry and Gilles Deleuze’s philosophy of the event. Henry’s phenomenology has been overlooked in recent commentaries compared with, for example, Jean-Luc Marion’s work. It will be shown here that Henry’s philosophy presents a detailed novel turn in phenomenology structured according to critical moves against positions developed from Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty. This demonstration is done through a strong contrast with Deleuze and (...)
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  • Dismantling the Face: Pluralism and the Politics of Recognition.Simone Bignall - 2012 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 6 (3):389-410.
    Plural expressions of ‘belonging’ in postcolonial and multicultural societies give particular emphasis to a politics of cultural recognition. Within nations, diverse communities call for acknowledgement of their aspirations, for fair representation in public life and for protection of the distinctive cultural practices and beliefs that define and help to sustain minoritarian identities. Recognition is also important for group self-concept and cohesion, and so plays a vital role in the creation of stable platforms for political resistance. This essay explores Deleuze and (...)
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  • Becoming-Rhythm: A Rhizomatics of the Girl.Leisha Jones - 2011 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 5 (3):383-399.
    I appropriate Deleuze and Guattari's concept of the refrain for a feminist analysis of the girl because it offers more insight into the ways girls construct themselves as performative networks than the death-by-culture or at-risk model preferred by such feminists as Jean Kilbourne, Carol Gilligan, and even Susan Bordo. I proffer that it costs women everything to practise a politics of difference that is by definition reactionary, a reaction to the cultural refusal of leaky gendered bodies that must be overcome. (...)
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  • Critical Forces: True Critique or Mere Criticism of Deleuze Contra Hegel?Kane X. Faucher - 2010 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 4 (3):329-355.
    The principal concern of this paper is to track the first wave of criticism directed against Deleuze's relation to Hegelianism as it has appeared in the English-speaking world. To this end, we assess the criticisms offered by Stephen Houlgate, Judith Butler, and Catherine Malabou, each of whom, in their respective ways, accuse Deleuze of misreading Hegel, claiming that his rejection of Hegelianism merely reinforces a secret or unacknowledged Hegelianism inherent in his own critique. Despite the brisk treatment Houlgate grants Deleuze, (...)
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  • Passions and Actions: Deleuze's Cinematographic Cogito.Richard Rushton - 2008 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 2 (2):121-139.
    When writing about cinema does Deleuze have a conception of cinema spectatorship? In New Philosophy for New Media, Mark Hansen argues that Deleuze does have a conception of cinema spectatorship but that the subjectivity central to that spectatorship is weak and impoverished. This article argues against Hansen's reductive interpretation of Deleuze. In doing so, it relies on the three syntheses of time developed in Difference and Repetition alongside an elaboration of Deleuze's notion of a ‘cinematographic Cogito’. In this way, the (...)
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  • Gilles Deleuze.Daniel Smith - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Gilles Deleuze (January 18, 1925–November 4, 1995) was one of the most influential and prolific French philosophers of the second half of the twentieth century. Deleuze conceived of philosophy as the production of concepts, and he characterized himself as a “pure metaphysician.” In his magnum opus Difference and Repetition , he tries to develop a metaphysics adequate to contemporary mathematics and science—a metaphysics in which the concept of multiplicity replaces that of substance, event replaces essence and virtuality replaces possibility. Deleuze (...)
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