Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Generation of Referring Expressions: Assessing the Incremental Algorithm.Kees van Deemter, Albert Gatt, Ielka van der Sluis & Richard Power - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (5):799-836.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Generation of Referring Expressions: Assessing the Incremental Algorithm.Kees van Deemter, Albert Gatt, Ielka van der Sluis & Richard Power - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (5):799-836.
    A substantial amount of recent work in natural language generation has focused on the generation of ‘‘one-shot’’ referring expressions whose only aim is to identify a target referent. Dale and Reiter's Incremental Algorithm (IA) is often thought to be the best algorithm for maximizing the similarity to referring expressions produced by people. We test this hypothesis by eliciting referring expressions from human subjects and computing the similarity between the expressions elicited and the ones generated by algorithms. It turns out that (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Effects of Ambiguous Gestures and Language on the Time Course of Reference Resolution.Max M. Louwerse & Adrian Bangerter - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (8):1517-1529.
    Two eye-tracking experiments investigated how and when pointing gestures and location descriptions affect target identification. The experiments investigated the effect of gestures and referring expressions on the time course of fixations to the target, using videos of human gestures and human voice, and animated gestures and synthesized speech. Ambiguous, yet informative pointing gestures elicited attention and facilitated target identification, akin to verbal location descriptions. Moreover, target identification was superior when both pointing gestures and verbal location descriptions were used. These findings (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Bootstrapping the Mind: Analogical Processes and Symbol Systems.Dedre Gentner - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (5):752-775.
    Human cognition is striking in its brilliance and its adaptability. How do we get that way? How do we move from the nearly helpless state of infants to the cognitive proficiency that characterizes adults? In this paper I argue, first, that analogical ability is the key factor in our prodigious capacity, and, second, that possession of a symbol system is crucial to the full expression of analogical ability.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  • Implicature.Wayne Davis - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   45 citations  
  • Limits to the Rational Production of Discourse Connectives.Frances Yung, Jana Jungbluth & Vera Demberg - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Rational accounts of language use such as the uniform information density hypothesis, which asserts that speakers distribute information uniformly across their utterances, and the rational speech act model, which suggests that speakers optimize the formulation of their message by reasoning about what the comprehender would understand, have been hypothesized to account for a wide range of language use phenomena. We here specifically focus on the production of discourse connectives. While there is some prior work indicating that discourse connective production may (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Reductionism About Understanding Why.Insa Lawler - 2016 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 116 (2):229-236.
    Paulina Sliwa (2015) argues that knowing why p is necessary and sufficient for understanding why p. She tries to rebut recent attacks against the necessity and sufficiency claims, and explains the gradability of understanding why in terms of knowledge. I argue that her attempts do not succeed, but I indicate more promising ways to defend reductionism about understanding why throughout the discussion.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Referential Form and Memory for the Discourse History.Si On Yoon, Aaron S. Benjamin & Sarah Brown-Schmidt - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (4):e12964.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Word Order Predicts Cross‐Linguistic Differences in the Production of Redundant Color and Number Modifiers.Sarah A. Wu & Edward Gibson - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (1):e12934.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Real‐Time Investigation of Referential Domains in Unscripted Conversation: A Targeted Language Game Approach.Sarah Brown-Schmidt & Michael K. Tanenhaus - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (4):643-684.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  • This and That Revisited: A Social and Multimodal Approach to Spatial Demonstratives.David Peeters & Aslı Özyürek - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
  • Toward a Computational Psycholinguistics of Reference Production.Kees van Deemter, Albert Gatt, Roger P. G. van Gompel & Emiel Krahmer - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (2):166-183.
    This article introduces the topic ‘‘Production of Referring Expressions: Bridging the Gap between Computational and Empirical Approaches to Reference’’ of the journal Topics in Cognitive Science. We argue that computational and psycholinguistic approaches to reference production can benefit from closer interaction, and that this is likely to result in the construction of algorithms that differ markedly from the ones currently known in the computational literature. We focus particularly on determinism, the feature of existing algorithms that is perhaps most clearly at (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Explicit and Emergent Mechanisms of Information Status.Jennifer E. Arnold - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (4):737-760.
    It is well established that language production and comprehension are influenced by information status, for example, whether information is given, new, topical, or predictable, and many scholars suggest that an important component of information status is keeping track of what information is in common ground, and what is not. Information status affects both speakers' choices and how listeners interpret the speaker's meaning. Although there is a wealth of scholarly work on information status, there is no consensus on the mechanisms by (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • ’Naming’ as a Mapping Between N-Dimensional Geometries.John M. Carroll - 1986 - Semiotica 61 (3-4):219-242.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Information Integration in Modulation of Pragmatic Inferences During Online Language Comprehension.Rachel Ryskin, Chigusa Kurumada & Sarah Brown‐Schmidt - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (8).
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Overinformative Speakers Are Cooperative: Revisiting the Gricean Maxim of Quantity.Paula Rubio‐Fernandez - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (11).
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Graph‐Theoretic Properties of Networks Based on Word Association Norms: Implications for Models of Lexical Semantic Memory.Thomas M. Gruenenfelder, Gabriel Recchia, Tim Rubin & Michael N. Jones - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (6):1460-1495.
    We compared the ability of three different contextual models of lexical semantic memory and of a simple associative model to predict the properties of semantic networks derived from word association norms. None of the semantic models were able to accurately predict all of the network properties. All three contextual models over-predicted clustering in the norms, whereas the associative model under-predicted clustering. Only a hybrid model that assumed that some of the responses were based on a contextual model and others on (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Historical Context in Conversation: Lexical Differentiation and Memory for the Discourse History.Si On Yoon, Aaron S. Benjamin & Sarah Brown-Schmidt - 2016 - Cognition 154:102-117.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Referring as a Collaborative Process.Herbert H. Clark & Deanna Wilkes-Gibbs - 1986 - Cognition 22 (1):1-39.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   156 citations  
  • From Concepts to Lexical Items.Manfred Bierwisch & Robert Schreuder - 1992 - Cognition 42 (1-3):23-60.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  • The Effect of Scene Variation on the Redundant Use of Color in Definite Reference.Ruud Koolen, Martijn Goudbeek & Emiel Krahmer - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (2):395-411.
    This study investigates to what extent the amount of variation in a visual scene causes speakers to mention the attribute color in their definite target descriptions, focusing on scenes in which this attribute is not needed for identification of the target. The results of our three experiments show that speakers are more likely to redundantly include a color attribute when the scene variation is high as compared with when this variation is low (even if this leads to overspecified descriptions). We (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Nameheads.John M. Carroll - 1983 - Cognitive Science 7 (2):121-153.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • When Do Speakers Take Into Account Common Ground?William S. Horton & Boaz Keysar - 1996 - Cognition 59 (1):91-117.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   60 citations  
  • There May Be a “Schizophrenic Language”.Nancy C. Andreasen - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):588-589.
  • Little Houses and Casas Pequeñas: Message Formulation and Syntactic Form in Unscripted Speech with Speakers of English and Spanish.Sarah Brown-Schmidt & Agnieszka E. Konopka - 2008 - Cognition 109 (2):274-280.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Is There a Schizophrenic Language?Steven Schwartz - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):579-588.
    Among the many peculiarities of schizophrenics perhaps the most obvious is their tendency to say odd things. Indeed, for most clinicians, the hallmark of schizophrenia is “thought disorder”. Decades of clinical observations, experimental research, and linguistic analyses have produced many hypotheses about what, precisely, is wrong with schizophrenic speech and language. These hypotheses range from assertions that schizophrenics have peculiar word association hierarchies to the notion that schizophrenics are suffering from an intermittent form of aphasia. In this article, several popular (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   93 citations  
  • Inconstancy of Schizophrenic Language and Symptoms.M. Bleuler - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):591-591.
  • Social Psychological Models of Interpersonal Communication.Robert M. Krauss & Susan R. Fussell - 1996 - In E. E. Higgins & A. Kruglanski (eds.), Social Psychology: Handbook of Basic Principles. Guilford. pp. 655--701.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Lexical Relevance and Semantic Disposition.B. Rieger - 1985 - In G. A. J. Hoppenbrouwers, Pieter A. M. Seuren & A. J. M. M. Weijters (eds.), Meaning and the Lexicon. Foris Publications. pp. 387--400.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Relational Correspondence Between Category Exemplars and Names.Kimberly A. Jameson & Nancy Alvarado - 2003 - Philosophical Psychology 16 (1):25 – 49.
    While recognizing the theoretical importance of context, current research has treated naming as though semantic meaning were invariant and the same mapping of category exemplars and names should exist across experimental contexts. An assumed symmetry or bidirectionality in naming behavior has been implicit in the interchangeable use of tasks that ask subjects to match names to stimuli and tasks that ask subjects to match stimuli to names. Examples from the literature are discussed together with several studies of color naming and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • If There Were Such People as Schizophrenics, What Language Would They Speak?Steven Schwartz - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):615-626.
  • Stages in the Disintegration of Thought and Language Competence in Schizophrenia.K. Zaimov - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):614-615.
  • What is Meant by Schizophrenic Speech?Walter Weintraub - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):613-614.
  • Language in Schizophrenia: A Social Psychological Perspective.D. R. Rutter - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):612-613.
  • Aphasia as a Model for Schizophrenic Speech.Fred Ovsiew & Daniel B. Hier - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):611-612.
  • Criteria for Evaluating Hypotheses Regarding Information Processing and Schizophrenia.Thomas F. Oltmanns - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):610-611.
  • Schizophrenic Information-Processing Deficit: What Type or Level of Processing is Disordered?Keith H. Nuechterlein - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):609-610.
  • The Language of Schizophrenic Language.Charles Neuringer - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):608-609.
  • What is Language?J. R. Martin - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):607-608.
  • Schizophrenic Language: An Ephemeron Hiding an Ephemeron.James C. Mancuso, Theodore R. Sarbin & William A. Heerdt - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):605-607.
  • Schizophasia.André Roch Lecours - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):605-605.
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Language Competence and Schizophrenic Language.Julius Laffal - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):604-605.
  • Language Disorder and Hemispheric Asymmetries in Schizophrenia.R. G. Knight - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):603-604.
  • Evaluating Pigeonholing as an Explanatory Construct for Schizophrenics' Cognitive Deficiencies.Raymond A. Knight & Judith E. Sims-Knight - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):601-603.
  • Schizophasia is Distinct but Not Aphasic.Andrew Kertesz - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):601-601.
  • Verbal Encoding and Language Abnormality in Schizophrenia.Stanley R. Kay - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):599-600.
  • Failure to Establish Appropriate Response Sets: An Explanation for a Range of Schizophrenic Phenomena?David R. Hemsley - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):599-599.
  • Advances in Schizophrenia Research: Neuropathologic Findings.John K. Darby - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):598-599.
  • Schizophrenia: First You See It; Then You Don't.Rue L. Cromwell & Lawrence G. Space - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):597-598.
  • Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Double Taxonomic Swamp.Kenneth Mark Colby - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):596-597.