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  1. Naive Theories of Intelligence and the Role of Processing Fluency in Perceived Comprehension.David B. Miele & Daniel C. Molden - 2010 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 139 (3):535-557.
  • Memory Predictions Are Influenced by Perceptual Information: Evidence for Metacognitive Illusions.Matthew G. Rhodes & Alan D. Castel - 2008 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 137 (4):615-625.
  • The Secret Life of Fluency.Daniel M. Oppenheimer - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (6):237-241.
  • What's in a Typeface? Evidence of the Existence of Print Personalities in Arabic.Timothy R. Jordan, Alya S. AlShamsi, Hajar A. K. Yekani, Maryam AlJassmi, Nada Al Dosari, Ehab W. Hermena & Mercedes Sheen - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • Knowledge in and Out of Contrast.Mikkel Gerken & James R. Beebe - 2016 - Noûs 50 (1):133-164.
    We report and discuss the results of a series of experiments that address a contrast effect exhibited by folk judgments about knowledge ascriptions. The contrast effect, which was first reported by Schaffer and Knobe, is an important aspect of our folk epistemology. However, there are competing theoretical accounts of it. We shed light on the various accounts by providing novel empirical data and theoretical considerations. Our key findings are, firstly, that belief ascriptions exhibit a similar contrast effect and, secondly, that (...)
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  • Processing Fluency of the Forms and Sounds of Chinese Characters.Siyun Liu, Xujin Zhang, Yi Ren & Qiong Yu - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):191-203.
    The goal of this study is to investigate whether different types of structures and lexical tones of Chinese characters cause different processing fluency. In Experiment 1, participants’ explicit affective assessments of Chinese characters with different structures, frequencies, and lexical tones were analyzed. Results indicated that participants showed explicit preferences and dispreferences to different structures and lexical tones. In Experiment 2, participants’ implicit responses to different structures and lexical tones were investigated using a metaphor experimental paradigm. Results were consistent with the (...)
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  • Looking in the Wrong Direction Correlates With More Accurate Word Learning.Stanka A. Fitneva & Morten H. Christiansen - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (2):367-380.
    Previous research on lexical development has aimed to identify the factors that enable accurate initial word-referent mappings based on the assumption that the accuracy of initial word-referent associations is critical for word learning. The present study challenges this assumption. Adult English speakers learned an artificial language within a cross-situational learning paradigm. Visual fixation data were used to assess the direction of visual attention. Participants whose longest fixations in the initial trials fell more often on distracter images performed significantly better at (...)
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  • Developmental Changes in Cross‐Situational Word Learning: The Inverse Effect of Initial Accuracy.Stanka A. Fitneva & Morten H. Christiansen - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S1):141-161.
    Intuitively, the accuracy of initial word-referent mappings should be positively correlated with the outcome of learning. Yet recent evidence suggests an inverse effect of initial accuracy in adults, whereby greater accuracy of initial mappings is associated with poorer outcomes in a cross-situational learning task. Here, we examine the impact of initial accuracy on 4-year-olds, 10-year-olds, and adults. For half of the participants most word-referent mappings were initially correct and for the other half most mappings were initially incorrect. Initial accuracy was (...)
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  • Self-Generated Cognitive Fluency as an Alternative Route to Preference Formation.Merryn D. Constable, Andrew P. Bayliss, Steven P. Tipper & Ada Kritikos - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (1):47-52.
    People tend to prefer fluently processed over harder to process information. In this study we examine two issues concerning fluency and preference. First, previous research has pre-selected fluent and non-fluent materials. We did not take this approach yet show that the fluency of individuals’ idiosyncratic on-line interactions with a given stimulus can influence preference formation. Second, while processing fluency influences preference, the opposite also may be true: preferred stimuli could be processed more fluently than non-preferred. Participants performed a visual search (...)
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  • Analytic Thinking: Do You Feel Like It?Valerie Thompson & Kinga Morsanyi - 2012 - Mind and Society 11 (1):93-105.
    A major challenge for Dual Process Theories of reasoning is to predict the circumstances under which intuitive answers reached on the basis of Type 1 processing are kept or discarded in favour of analytic, Type 2 processing (Thompson 2009 ). We propose that a key determinant of the probability that Type 2 processes intervene is the affective response that accompanies Type 1 processing. This affective response arises from the fluency with which the initial answer is produced, such that fluently produced (...)
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