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  1. Global Justice, Capabilities Approach and Commercial Surrogacy in India.Sheela Saravanan - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (3):295-307.
    Inequalities, ineffective governance, unclear surrogacy regulations and unethical practices make India an ideal environment for global injustice in the process of commercial surrogacy. This article aims to apply the ‘capabilities approach’ to find possibilities of global justice through human fellowship in the context of commercial surrogacy. I draw primarily on my research findings supplemented by other relevant empirical research and documentary films on surrogacy. The paper reveals inequalities and inadequate basic entitlements among surrogate mothers as a consequence of which they (...)
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  • A Closer Look at the Business Case for Diversity: The Tangled Web of Equity and Epistemic Benefits.Daniel Steel & Naseeb Bolduc - 2020 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 50 (5):418-443.
    This article examines the business case for diversity, according to which diversity should be promoted because diverse groups outperform nondiverse groups. Philosophers who defend BCD usually...
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  • Does Reproductive Justice Demand Insurance Coverage for IVF? Reflections on the Work of Anne Donchin.Carolyn McLeod - 2017 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 10 (2):133-143.
    This paper comes out of a panel honoring the work of Anne Donchin (1940-2014), which took place at the 2016 Congress of the International Network on Feminist Approaches to Bioethics (FAB) in Edinburgh. My general aim is to highlight the contributions Anne made to feminist bioethics, and to feminist reproductive ethics in particular. My more specific aim, however, is to have a kind of conversation with Anne, through her work, about whether reproductive justice could demand insurance coverage for in vitro (...)
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  • Fiduciary Duties and Commercial Surrogacy.A. Ryman Emma - 2017 - Dissertation, University of Western Ontario
    Since the 1980’s, surrogacy has become a popular reproductive alternative for individuals experiencing infertility. The ethical and legal analyses of surrogacy have been rich and varied. Some bioethicists have charged the commercial surrogacy industry with the exploitation of global southern women or with the impermissible commodification of children and women’s reproductive capacities. Others have praised the potential for economic empowerment and bodily autonomy that surrogacy may accord to women. However, throughout these explorations of the ethics of surrogacy, comparatively little attention (...)
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  • Our Life Depends on This Drug: Competence, Inequity, and Voluntary Consent in Clinical Trials on Supervised Injectable Opioid Assisted Treatment.Daniel Steel, Kirsten Marchand & Eugenia Oviedo-Joekes - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (12):32-40.
    Supervised injectable opioid assisted treament prescribes injectable opioids to individuals for whom other forms of addiction treatment have been ineffective. In this article, we examine arguments that opioid-dependent people should be assumed incompetent to voluntarily consent to clinical research on siOAT unless proven otherwise. We agree that concerns about competence and voluntary consent deserve careful attention in this context. But we oppose framing the issue solely as a matter of the competence of opioid-dependent people and emphasize that it should be (...)
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  • Exploitation, Structural Injustice, and the Cross-Border Trade in Human Ova.Monique Deveaux - 2016 - Journal of Global Ethics 12 (1):48-68.
    ABSTRACTGlobal demand for human ova in in vitro fertilization has led to its expansion in countries with falling average incomes and rising female unemployment. Paid egg donation in the context of national, regional, and global inequalities has the potential to exploit women who are socioeconomically vulnerable, and indeed there is ample evidence that it does. Structural injustices that render women in middle-income countries – and even some high-income countries – economically vulnerable contribute to a context of ‘omissive coercion’ that is (...)
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  • Context Matters! Why Termsof Transaction as Well as Autonomy Should Be Analyzed in the Context of Low-Income Countries.Sharon Bassan - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (5):48-50.
  • Transnational Surrogacy and the Justice Condition of Nonexploitation.Vida Panitch - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (5):46-48.
  • Gestational Surrogates in Rural India: A Lot to Offer and Even More to Lose.Gladys White - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (5):40-42.
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  • Too Blunt a Tool: A Case for Subsuming Analyses of Exploitation in Transnational Gestational Surrogacy Under a Justice or Human Rights Framework.G. K. D. Crozier - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (5):38-40.
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  • Engaging With a Peer-Proposed, Additional Exploitation Condition: Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Transnational Gestational Surrogacy: Does It Have to Be Exploitative?”.Jeffrey Kirby - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (5):W1 - W3.
    This article explores the controversial practice of transnational gestational surrogacy and poses a provocative question: Does it have to be exploitative? Various existing models of exploitation are considered and a novel exploitation-evaluation heuristic is introduced to assist in the analysis of the potentially exploitative dimensions/elements of complex health-related practices. On the basis of application of the heuristic, I conclude that transnational gestational surrogacy, as currently practiced in low-income country settings, is exploitative of surrogate women. Arising out of consideration of the (...)
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  • Commercial Contract Pregnancy in India, Judgment, and Resistance to Oppression.Katy Fulfer - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (4):846-861.
    Feminist scholars have done much to identify oppressive forces within transnational commercial contract pregnancy and its social context that may coerce women into becoming gestational laborers. Feminists have also been careful not to depict gestational laborers as merely passive victims of oppression, though there is disagreement about the degree to which contract pregnancy offers opportunities for agency. In this article I consider how women who sell gestational labor may be agents against their oppression. I make explicit connections between resistance and (...)
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