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  1. Living the Theologico-Political Problem: Leo Strauss on the Common Ground of Philosophy and Theology.Mark J. Lutz - 2018 - The European Legacy 24 (2):123-145.
    ABSTRACTLeo Strauss argues that the “theologico-political” problem arose from the competing claims of rationalist philosophy and theology. Although he urges others to take sides in this debate, most theorists see it as insoluble, since it is rooted in competing traditions and different, non-demonstrable, epistemic principles. Strauss, however, argues that there is a common ground capable of sustaining a contest between the two: their appeal to the pre-philosophic understanding of justice as moral virtue. The contest between the Bible and Socratic-Platonic philosophy (...)
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  • On the Tragedy of the Modern Condition: The ‘Theologico-Political Problem’ in Carl Schmitt, Leo Strauss, and Hannah Arendt.Facundo Vega - 2017 - The European Legacy 22 (6):697-728.
    This article addresses Eric L. Santner’s claim that “there is more political theology in everyday life than we might have ever thought” by analyzing the “theologico-political problem” in the work of three prominent twentieth-century political thinkers—Carl Schmitt, Leo Strauss, and Hannah Arendt. Schmitt, Strauss, and Arendt share a preoccupation with the crisis of modern political liberalism and confront the theologico-political problem in a similar spirit: although their responses differ dramatically, their individual accounts dwell on the absence of incontestable principles in (...)
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  • Leo Strauss: de Nietzsche a Platón.Oscar Mauricio Donato & Luciano Nosetto - 2014 - Bogota: Universidad Libre.
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  • The Straussian Paradigm Turned Upside-Down: A Model for Studying Political Philosophy.J. Mikael Olsson - 2013 - Minerva - An Internet Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):49-73.
    Much of Leo Strauss's scholarship focused on the possibilities of moral knowledge and the quality of rulers, and these interests guide his readings in the history of political philosophy. I suggest that this is a fruitful way of studying political thought. It will, however, be argued that Strauss's belief in objective morality should be discarded. Thus, our judgments on past thinkers may have to be reversed or modified. Strauss's belief that only objective values can lend a firm support to democracy (...)
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  • Platón en la relación intelectual de Eric Voegelin y Leo Strauss.Bernat Torres Morales & Josep Monserrat Molas - 2011 - Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 28:275-302.
    This essay examines the relationship between Eric Voegelin and Leo Strauss in order to show the central themes necessary to elucidate their philosophical positions. The essay reveals the centrality of the figure of Plato as a point of departure to understand the agreement and the disagreement concerning fundamental questions (such as the way of reading ancient texts, the importance of the historical perspective or the importance of the study of the past in order to orient the modern science) which revolves (...)
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  • La intolerante tolerancia. Notas a la crítica Straussiana al liberalismo.Nicolás Patrici - 2011 - Astrolabio: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 11:359-377.
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  • Jerusalem in Athens: On the Biblical Epigraphs to Leo Strauss's Natural Right and History.Paul O'Mahoney - 2012 - Heythrop Journal 53 (3):418-431.
    The Old Testament epigraphs used by Leo Strauss for his study Natural Right and History tend invariably to vex his readers. In the book itself and in other of his writings, Strauss explicitly states that the Old Testament tradition does not know ‘nature’ in the philosophical sense, and hence the concept of ‘natural right’ is unknown or alien to that tradition. Another, more obvious problem they present has been seemingly universally passed over by commentators: neither epigraph tells the reader anything (...)
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