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  1. Affective Consciousness: Core Emotional Feelings in Animals and Humans.Jaak Panksepp - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):30-80.
    The position advanced in this paper is that the bedrock of emotional feelings is contained within the evolved emotional action apparatus of mammalian brains. This dual-aspect monism approach to brain–mind functions, which asserts that emotional feelings may reflect the neurodynamics of brain systems that generate instinctual emotional behaviors, saves us from various conceptual conundrums. In coarse form, primary process affective consciousness seems to be fundamentally an unconditional “gift of nature” rather than an acquired skill, even though those systems facilitate skill (...)
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  • Feeling and Representing: Computational Theory and the Modularity of Affect.Louis C. Charland - 1995 - Synthese 105 (3):273-301.
    In this paper I review some leading developments in the empirical theory of affect. I argue that (1) affect is a distinct perceptual representation governed system, and (2) that there are significant modular factors in affect. The paper concludes with the observation thatfeeler (affective perceptual system) may be a natural kind within cognitive science. The main purpose of the paper is to explore some hitherto unappreciated connections between the theory of affect and the computational theory of mind.
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  • The Heat of Emotion: Valence and the Demarcation Problem.Louis Charland - 2005 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (8-10):8-10.
    Philosophical discussions regarding the status of emotion as a scientific domain usually get framed in terms of the question whether emotion is a natural kind. That approach to the issues is wrongheaded for two reasons. First, it has led to an intractable philosophical impasse that ultimately misconstrues the character of the relevant debate in emotion science. Second, and most important, it entirely ignores valence, a central feature of emotion experience, and probably the most promising criterion for demarcating emotion from cognition (...)
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  • Perceptual Symbol Systems.Lawrence W. Barsalou - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):577-660.
    Prior to the twentieth century, theories of knowledge were inherently perceptual. Since then, developments in logic, statis- tics, and programming languages have inspired amodal theories that rest on principles fundamentally different from those underlying perception. In addition, perceptual approaches have become widely viewed as untenable because they are assumed to implement record- ing systems, not conceptual systems. A perceptual theory of knowledge is developed here in the context of current cognitive science and neuroscience. During perceptual experience, association areas in the (...)
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  • The Myth of Self-Deception.Steffen Borge - 2003 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 41 (1):1-28.
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  • Moods and Appraisals: How the Phenomenology and Science of Emotions Can Come Together.Andreas Elpidorou - 2013 - Human Studies (4):1-27.
    In this paper, I articulate Heidegger’s notion of Befindlichkeit and show that his phenomenological account of affective existence can be understood in terms of contemporary work on emotions. By examining Heidegger’s account alongside contemporary accounts of emotions, I not only demonstrate the ways in which key aspects of the former are present in the latter; I also explicate in detail the ways in which our understanding of Befindlichkeit and its relationship to moods and emotions can benefit from an empirically-informed study (...)
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  • Anxiety: Here and Beyond.Beyon Miloyan, Adam Bulley & Thomas Suddendorf - 2019 - Emotion Review 11 (1):39-49.
    The future harbours the potential for myriad threats to the fitness of organisms, and many species prepare accordingly based on indicators of hazards. Here, we distinguish between defensive responses on the basis of sensed cues and those based on autocues generated by mental simulations of the future in humans. Whereas sensed threat cues usually induce specific responses with reference to particular features of the environment or generalized responses to protect against diffuse threats, autocues generated by mental simulations of the future (...)
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  • Modularity, and the Psychoevolutionary Theory of Emotion.Paul E. Griffiths - 1990 - Biology and Philosophy 5 (2):175-196.
    It is unreasonable to assume that our pre-scientific emotion vocabulary embodies all and only those distinctions required for a scientific psychology of emotion. The psychoevolutionary approach to emotion yields an alternative classification of certain emotion phenomena. The new categories are based on a set of evolved adaptive responses, or affect-programs, which are found in all cultures. The triggering of these responses involves a modular system of stimulus appraisal, whose evoluations may conflict with those of higher-level cognitive processes. Whilst the structure (...)
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  • Common Denominators in Research on Emotion Language: A Postscript.Anna Ogarkova & Philippe Borgeaud - 2009 - Social Science Information 48 (3):523-543.
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  • Dynamical Evolutionary Psychology: Individual Decision Rules and Emergent Social Norms.Douglas T. Kenrick, Norman P. Li & Jonathan Butner - 2003 - Psychological Review 110 (1):3-28.
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  • Beyond Valence: Toward a Model of Emotion-Specific Influences on Judgement and Choice.Jennifer S. Lerner & Dacher Keltner - 2000 - Cognition and Emotion 14 (4):473-493.
  • Towards a Theory of Mood Function.Muk Yan Wong - 2016 - Philosophical Psychology 29 (2):179-197.
    In light of Laura Sizer's and Robert Thayer's models of mood, I propose a functional theory to explain in what sense moods are adaptive. I argue that mood involves a mechanism which monitors our physical and mental energy levels in relation to the perceived energy demands of our environment, and generates corresponding cognitive biases in our reasoning style, attention, memory, thought, and creativity. The function of this mechanism is to engage us in the right task with the right amount of (...)
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  • Don't Give Up on Basic Emotions.Andrea Scarantino & Paul Griffiths - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (4):444-454.
    We argue that there are three coherent, nontrivial notions of basic-ness: conceptual basic-ness, biological basic-ness, and psychological basic-ness. There is considerable evidence for conceptually basic emotion categories (e.g., “anger,” “fear”). These categories do not designate biologically basic emotions, but some forms of anger, fear, and so on that are biologically basic in a sense we will specify. Finally, two notions of psychological basic-ness are distinguished, and the evidence for them is evaluated. The framework we offer acknowledges the force of some (...)
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  • Advancing Emotion Theory with Multivariate Pattern Classification.Philip A. Kragel & Kevin S. LaBar - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (2):160-174.
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  • Toward the Constitution of Emotional Feelings: Synergistic Lessons From Izard’s Differential Emotions Theory and Affective Neuroscience.Jaak Panksepp - 2015 - Emotion Review 7 (2):110-115.
  • Quantum Mechanics of 'Conscious Energy'.Syed Ismyl Mahmood Rizvi - 2018 - International Journal of Mind, Brain and Cognition 9 (1-2):132-160.
    This paper is aiming to investigate the physical substrate of conscious process. It will attempt to find out: How does conscious process establish relations between their external stimuli and internal stimuli in order to create reality? How does consciousness devoid of new sensory input result to its new quantum effects? And how does conscious process gain mass in brain? This paper will also try to locate the origins of consciousness at the level of neurons along with the quantum effects of (...)
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  • Consciousness as Recursive, Spatiotemporal Self Location.Frederic Peters - 2010 - Psychological Research.
    At the phenomenal level, consciousness can be described as a singular, unified field of recursive self-awareness, consistently coherent in a particualr way; that of a subject located both spatially and temporally in an egocentrically-extended domain, such that conscious self-awareness is explicitly characterized by I-ness, now-ness and here-ness. The psychological mechanism underwriting this spatiotemporal self-locatedness and its recursive processing style involves an evolutionary elaboration of the basic orientative reference frame which consistently structures ongoing spatiotemporal self-location computations as i-here-now. Cognition computes action-output (...)
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  • Evolutionary Explanations of Emotions.Randolph M. Nesse - 1990 - Human Nature 1 (3):261-289.
    Emotions can be explained as specialized states, shaped by natural selection, that increase fitness in specific situations. The physiological, psychological, and behavioral characteristics of a specific emotion can be analyzed as possible design features that increase the ability to cope with the threats and opportunities present in the corresponding situation. This approach to understanding the evolutionary functions of emotions is illustrated by the correspondence between (a) the subtypes of fear and the different kinds of threat; (b) the attributes of happiness (...)
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  • Neurobiology of the Structure of Personality: Dopamine, Facilitation of Incentive Motivation, and Extraversion.Richard A. Depue & Paul F. Collins - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):491-517.
    Extraversion has two central characteristics: (1) interpersonalengagement, which consists of affiliation (enjoying and valuing close interpersonal bonds, being warm and affectionate) and agency (being socially dominant, enjoying leadership roles, being assertive, being exhibitionistic, and having a sense of potency in accomplishing goals) and (2) impulsivity, which emerges from the interaction of extraversion and a second, independent trait (constraint). Agency is a more general motivational disposition that includes dominance, ambition, mastery, efficacy, and achievement. Positive affect (a combination of positive feelings and (...)
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  • On Mapping Anxiety.Jeffrey A. Gray - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):506-534.
  • Leaping Up the Phylogenetic Scale in Explaining Anxiety: Perils and Possibilities.Marvin Zuckerman - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):505-506.
  • The Septo-Hippocampal System and Behavior: Difficulties in Finding the Exit.Michael L. Woodruff - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):504-504.
  • Substrates of Anxiety: But If the Starting Point is Wrong?Holger Ursin - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):503-504.
  • Inferring Anxiety and Antianxiety Effects in Animals.Philippe Soubrié - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):502-503.
  • Does Hippocampal Theta Tell Us Anything About the Neuropsychology of Anxiety?Terry E. Robinson & Barbara A. Therrien - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):500-502.
  • Hypotheses of Neuroleptic Action: Levels of Progress.Roy A. Wise - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):78-87.
  • The Dynamics of Action and the Neuropsychology of Anxiety.William Revelle - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):499-499.
  • A Discriminating Case Against Anhedonia.T. N. Tombaugh - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):77-78.
  • The Relationship Between Memory and Anxiety.J. N. P. Rawlins - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):498-499.
  • Neuroleptic-Induced Anhedonia: Some Psychopharmacological Implications.Philippe Soubrie - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):76-77.
  • Attention, Dopamine, and Schizophrenia.Paul R. Solomon & Andrew Crider - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):75-76.
  • The Anatomy of Anxiety?Karl H. Pribram & Diane McGuinness - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):496-498.
  • The Reward-Effort Model: An Economic Framework for Examining the Mechanism of Neuroleptic Action.Harry M. Sinnamon - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):73-75.
  • Anxiety Viewed From the Upper Brain Stem: Though Panic and Fear Yield Trepidation, Should Both Be Called Anxiety?Jaak Panksepp - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):495-496.
  • Neurolepsis: Anhedonia or Blunting of Emotional Reactivity?Richard H. Rech - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):72-73.
  • The Pleasure in Brain Substrates of Foraging.Jaak Panksepp - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):71-72.
  • Functions of the Septo-Hippocampal System.David S. Olton - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):494-495.
  • The Anhedonia Hypothesis of Neuroleptic Drug Action: Basic and Clinical Considerations.Charles B. Nemeroff & Daniel Luttinger - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):70-71.
  • On Novelty, Places, and the Septo-Hippocampal System.Lynn Nadel & Richard Morris - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):493-494.
  • Problems of Concept and Vocabulary in the Anhedonia Hypothesis.Darryl Neill - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):70-70.
  • On the Generality of the Anhedonia Hypothesis.N. W. Milgram - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):69-69.
  • Gray's Neuropsychology of Anxiety: An Enquiry Into the Functions of Septohippocampal Theories.Neil McNaughton - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):492-493.
  • The Anhedonia Hypothesis: Termites in the Basement.Roger L. Mellgren - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):67-68.
  • Noradrenaline: Attention or Anxiety?Stephen T. Mason - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):491-492.
  • Wise's Neural Model Implicating the Reticular Formation: Some Queries.Robert B. Malmo & Helen P. Malmo - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):66-67.
  • The Anhedonia Vs the Eclectic Hypothesis.William Lyons - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):65-66.
  • Some Questions of Strategy in Neuropsychological Research on Anxiety.William Lyons - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):490-491.
  • Dopaminergic and Serotonergic Influence on D-Amphetamine Self-Administration: Alterations of Reward Perception.William H. Lyness - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):65-65.
  • Conditioned Suppression and Behavioural Inhibition.Julian C. Leslie - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):489-490.
  • Understanding Neuroleptics: From “Anhedonia” to “Neuroleptothesia”.Jeffrey Liebman - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):64-65.