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  1. Boundaries in Space and Time: Iconic Biases Across Modalities.Jeremy Kuhn, Carlo Geraci, Philippe Schlenker & Brent Strickland - 2021 - Cognition 210:104596.
    The idea that the form of a word reflects information about its meaning has its roots in Platonic philosophy, and has been experimentally investigated for concrete, sensory-based properties since the early 20th century. Here, we provide evidence for an abstract property of ‘boundedness’ that introduces a systematic, iconic bias on the phonological expectations of a novel lexicon. We show that this abstract property is general across events and objects. In Experiment 1, we show that subjects are systematically more likely to (...)
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  • English and Chinese Children’s Motion Event Similarity Judgments.Yinglin Ji & Jill Hohenstein - 2018 - Cognitive Linguistics 29 (1):45-76.
    This study explores the relationship between language and thought in similarity judgments by testing how monolingual children who speak languages with partial typological differences in motion description respond to visual motion event stimuli. Participants were either Chinese- or English-speaking, 3-year-olds, 8-year-olds and adults who judged the similarity between caused motion scenes in a match-to-sample task. The results suggest, first of all, that the two younger groups of 3-year-olds are predominantly path-oriented, irrespective of language, as evidenced by their significantly longer fixation (...)
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  • Asymmetric Coding of Categorical Spatial Relations in Both Language and Vision.J. C. Roth & S. L. Franconeri - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  • One Label or Two? Linguistic Influences on the Similarity Judgment of Objects Between English and Japanese Speakers.Takahiko Masuda, Keiko Ishii, Koji Miwa, Marghalara Rashid, Hajin Lee & Rania Mahdi - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • Inner Speech Deficits in People with Aphasia.Peter Langland-Hassan, Frank R. Faries, Michael J. Richardson & Aimee Dietz - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6:1-10.
    Despite the ubiquity of inner speech in our mental lives, methods for objectively assessing inner speech capacities remain underdeveloped. The most common means of assessing inner speech is to present participants with tasks requiring them to silently judge whether two words rhyme. We developed a version of this task to assess the inner speech of a population of patients with aphasia and corresponding language production deficits. As expected, patients’ performance on the silent rhyming task was severely impaired relative to controls. (...)
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  • Keeping the Result in Sight and Mind: General Cognitive Principles and Language‐Specific Influences in the Perception and Memory of Resultative Events.Maria Sakarias & Monique Flecken - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (1):e12708.
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  • Does Grammatical Aspect Affect Motion Event Cognition? A Cross-Linguistic Comparison of English and Swedish Speakers.Panos Athanasopoulos & Emanuel Bylund - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (2):286-309.
    In this article, we explore whether cross-linguistic differences in grammatical aspect encoding may give rise to differences in memory and cognition. We compared native speakers of two languages that encode aspect differently (English and Swedish) in four tasks that examined verbal descriptions of stimuli, online triads matching, and memory-based triads matching with and without verbal interference. Results showed between-group differences in verbal descriptions and in memory-based triads matching. However, no differences were found in online triads matching and in memory-based triads (...)
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  • On the Road to Somewhere: Brain Potentials Reflect Language Effects on Motion Event Perception.Monique Flecken, Panos Athanasopoulos, Jan Rouke Kuipers & Guillaume Thierry - 2015 - Cognition 141:41-51.
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  • Motion Through Syntactic Frames.Michele I. Feist - 2010 - Cognition 115 (1):192-196.
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  • Relative Contribution of Perception/Cognition and Language on Spatial Categorization.Soonja Choi & Kate Hattrup - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (1):102-129.
    This study investigated the relative contribution of perception/cognition and language-specific semantics in nonverbal categorization of spatial relations. English and Korean speakers completed a video-based similarity judgment task involving containment, support, tight fit, and loose fit. Both perception/cognition and language served as resources for categorization, and allocation between the two depended on the target relation and the features contrasted in the choices. Whereas perceptual/cognitive salience for containment and tight-fit features guided categorization in many contexts, language-specific semantics influenced categorization where the two (...)
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  • Competing Perspectives on Frames of Reference in Language and Thought.Peggy Li & Linda Abarbanell - 2018 - Cognition 170:9-24.
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  • Encoding of Event Roles From Visual Scenes is Rapid, Spontaneous, and Interacts with Higher-Level Visual Processing.Alon Hafri, John C. Trueswell & Brent Strickland - 2018 - Cognition 175:36-52.
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  • Interaction Between Language and Vision: It’s Momentary, Abstract, and It Develops.Banchiamlack Dessalegn & Barbara Landau - 2013 - Cognition 127 (3):331-344.
  • The Relation Between Event Apprehension and Utterance Formulation in Children: Evidence From Linguistic Omissions.Ann Bunger, John C. Trueswell & Anna Papafragou - 2012 - Cognition 122 (2):135-149.
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  • Episodic Memory Isn't Essentially Autonoetic.Peter Carruthers - 2018 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 41.
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  • The Nature of Unsymbolized Thinking.Agustín Vicente & Fernando Martínez-Manrique - 2016 - Philosophical Explorations 19 (2):173-187.
    Using the method of Descriptive Experience Sampling, some subjects report experiences of thinking that do not involve words or any other symbols [Hurlburt, R. T., and C. L. Heavey. 2006. Exploring Inner Experience. Amsterdam: John Benjamins; Hurlburt, R. T., and S. A. Akhter. 2008. “Unsymbolized Thinking.” Consciousness and Cognition 17 : 1364–1374]. Even though the possibility of this unsymbolized thinking has consequences for the debate on the phenomenological status of cognitive states, the phenomenon is still insufficiently examined. This paper analyzes (...)
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  • English Speakers Attend More Strongly Than Spanish Speakers to Manner of Motion When Classifying Novel Objects and Events.Alan W. Kersten, Christian A. Meissner, Julia Lechuga, Bennett L. Schwartz, Justin S. Albrechtsen & Adam Iglesias - 2010 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 139 (4):638-653.
  • The Influence of Language in Conceptualization: Three Views.Agustin Vicente & Fernando Martinez-Manrique - 2013 - ProtoSociology 20:89-106.
    Different languages carve the world in different categories. They also encode events in different ways, conventionalize different metaphorical mappings, and differ in their rule-based metonymies and patterns of meaning extensions. A long-standing, and controversial, question is whether this variability in the languages generates a corresponding variability in the conceptual structure of the speakers of those languages. Here we will present and discuss three interesting general proposals by focusing on representative authors of such proposals. The proposals are the following: first, that (...)
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