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  1. Why Zeno’s Paradoxes of Motion Are Actually About Immobility.Bathfield Maël - 2018 - Foundations of Science 23 (4):649-679.
    Zeno’s paradoxes of motion, allegedly denying motion, have been conceived to reinforce the Parmenidean vision of an immutable world. The aim of this article is to demonstrate that these famous logical paradoxes should be seen instead as paradoxes of immobility. From this new point of view, motion is therefore no longer logically problematic, while immobility is. This is convenient since it is easy to conceive that immobility can actually conceal motion, and thus the proposition “immobility is mere illusion of the (...)
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  • The Aleph Zero or Zero Dichotomy.Antonio Leon - 2006
    The Aleph Zero or Zero Dichotomy is a strong version of Zeno's Dichotomy II which being entirely derived from the topological successiveness of the w-order comes to the same Zeno's absurdity.
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  • Temporal Relations Vs. Logical Reduction: A Phenomenal Theory of Causality. [REVIEW]Alba Papa-Grimaldi - 2008 - Axiomathes 18 (3):339-358.
    Kant, in various parts of his treatment of causality, refers to determinism or the principle of sufficient reason as an inescapable principle. In fact, in the Second Analogy we find the elements to reconstruct a purely phenomenal determinism as a logical and tautological truth. I endeavour in this article to gather these elements into an organic theory of phenomenal causality and then show, in the third section, with a specific argument which I call the “paradox of phenomenal observation”, that this (...)
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  • The Presumption of Movement.Alba Papa-Grimaldi - 2007 - Axiomathes 17 (2):137-154.
    The conceptualisation of movement has always been problematical for Western thought, ever since Parmenides declared our incapacity to conceptualise the plurality of change because our self-identical thought can only know an identical being. Exploiting this peculiar feature and constraint on our thought, Zeno of Elea devised his famous paradoxes of movement in which he shows that the passage from a position to movement cannot be conceptualised. In this paper, I argue that this same constraint is at the root of our (...)
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