Citations of work:

Charles Sanders Peirce, Kenneth Laine Ketner & Hilary Putnam (1994). Reasoning and the Logic of Things.

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  1.  2
    Peirce and Aesthetic Education.Juliana Acosta López de Mesa - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 52 (2):246-261.
  2.  6
    Framework for Ontology-Driven Decision Making.Kenneth Baclawski, Eric S. Chan, Dieter Gawlick, Adel Ghoneimy, Kenny Gross, Zhen Hua Liu & Xing Zhang - 2017 - Applied Ontology 12 (3-4):245-273.
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  3.  24
    Rethinking Knowledge.Carlo Cellucci - 2015 - Metaphilosophy 46 (2):213-234.
    The view that the subject matter of epistemology is the concept of knowledge is faced with the problem that all attempts so far to define that concept are subject to counterexamples. As an alternative, this article argues that the subject matter of epistemology is knowledge itself rather than the concept of knowledge. Moreover, knowledge is not merely a state of mind but rather a certain kind of response to the environment that is essential for survival. In this perspective, the article (...)
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  4.  16
    Deleuze Challenges Kolmogorov on a Calculus of Problems.Jean-Claude Dumoncel - 2013 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 7 (2):169-193.
    In 1932 Kolmogorov created a calculus of problems. This calculus became known to Deleuze through a 1945 paper by Paulette Destouches-Février. In it, he ultimately recognised a deepening of mathematical intuitionism. However, from the beginning, he proceeded to show its limits through a return to the Leibnizian project of Calculemus taken in its metaphysical stance. In the carrying out of this project, which is illustrated through a paradigm borrowed from Spinoza, the formal parallelism between problems, Leibnizian themes and Peircean rhemes (...)
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  5.  3
    Inquiry, Vision and Objects: Foraging for Coherence Within Neuroscience.Jay Schulkin - 2013 - Human Affairs 23 (4):616-632.
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  6. On the Ternary Relation and Conditionality.Jc Beall, Ross Brady, J. Michael Dunn, A. P. Hazen, Edwin Mares, Robert K. Meyer, Graham Priest, Greg Restall, David Ripley, John Slaney & Richard Sylvan - 2012 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 41 (3):595 - 612.
    One of the most dominant approaches to semantics for relevant (and many paraconsistent) logics is the Routley-Meyer semantics involving a ternary relation on points. To some (many?), this ternary relation has seemed like a technical trick devoid of an intuitively appealing philosophical story that connects it up with conditionality in general. In this paper, we respond to this worry by providing three different philosophical accounts of the ternary relation that correspond to three conceptions of conditionality. We close by briefly discussing (...)
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  7. On the Distinction Between Peirce’s Abduction and Lipton’s Inference to the Best Explanation.Daniel G. Campos - 2011 - Synthese 180 (3):419-442.
    I argue against the tendency in the philosophy of science literature to link abduction to the inference to the best explanation (IBE), and in particular, to claim that Peireean abduction is a conceptual predecessor to IBE. This is not to discount either abduction or IBE. Rather the purpose of this paper is to clarify the relation between Peireean abduction and IBE in accounting for ampliative inference in science. This paper aims at a proper classification—not justification—of types of scientific reasoning. In (...)
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  8.  27
    Peirce’s Philosophy of Mathematical Education: Fostering Reasoning Abilities for Mathematical Inquiry.Daniel G. Campos - 2010 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (5):421-439.
  9.  7
    The Song of the Earth: A Pragmatic Rejoinder.Andrew Stables - 2010 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (7):796-807.
    In The Song of the Earth, Jonathan Bate promotes ‘ecopoesis’, contrasting it with ‘ecopolitical’ poetry (and by implication, other forms of writing and expression). Like others recently, including Simon James and Michael Bonnett, he appropriates the notion of ‘dwelling’ from Heidegger to add force to this distinction. Bate's argument is effectively that we have more chance of protecting the environment if we engage in ecopoetic activity, involving a sense of immediate response to nature, than if we do not. This has (...)
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  10.  14
    Beyond Peirce: The New Science of Semiotics and the Semiotics of Law. [REVIEW]Charls Pearson - 2008 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 21 (3):247-296.
    This paper shows how Peirce's semeiotic could be turned into a powerful science. The New Science of Semiotics provides not only a new paradigm and an empirical justification for all these applications, but also a rational and systematic procedure for carrying them out as well. Thus the New Science of Semiotics transforms the philosophy of law into the science of legal scholarship, the discipline that I call jurisology.
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  11.  9
    'New Continents': The Logical System of Josiah Royce.Scott Pratt - 2007 - History and Philosophy of Logic 28 (2):133-150.
    Josiah Royce (1855?1916) was, in addition to being the pre-eminent metaphysician at the turn of the 19th century in the USA, regarded as ?a logician of the first rank?. At the time of his death in 1916, he had begun a substantial and potentially revolutionary project in logic in which he sought to show the connection between logic and ethics, aesthetics, and metaphysics. His system was developed in light of the work of Bertrand Russell and A. B. Kempe and aimed (...)
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  12.  58
    Contemplating an Evolutionary Approach to Entrepreneurship.Colin Jones - 2006 - World Futures 62 (8):576 – 594.
    This artical explores that application of evolutionary approaches to the study of entrepreneurship. It is argued an evolutionary theory of entrepreneurship must give as much concern to the foundations of evolutionary thought as it does the nature of entrepreneurship. The central point being that we must move beyond a debate or preference of the natural selection and adaptationist viewpoints. Only then can the interrelationships between individuals, firms, populations and the environments within which they interact be better appreciated.
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  13.  17
    Educating Hopes.Patrick Shade - 2006 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 25 (3):191-225.
    Acknowledging the negative impact poverty and violence can have on the educational process, I explore ways in which a pragmatic interpretation of hope can guide us in formulating preventive and responsive measures that are not intrusive on the normal curriculum. I draw on key pragmatic ideas presented by John Dewey to emphasize habits central to a pragmatic theory of hope. Equally important is the notion of a community of hope that fosters the development of hope's habits. A hopeful pedagogy enables (...)
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  14.  75
    Systems Thinking for Knowledge.Steven A. Cavaleri - 2005 - World Futures 61 (5):378 – 396.
    The capacity to engage in systems thinking is often viewed as being a product of being able to understand complex systems due to one's facility in mastering systems theories, methods, and being able to adeptly reason. Relatively little attention is paid in the systems literature to the processes of learning from experience and creating knowledge as a direct consequence of individuals engaging systems thinking itself over time. In fact, the potential efficacy of systems thinking to improve performance normally seen as (...)
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  15.  26
    Peirce's Design for Thinking: An Embedded Philosophy of Education.Phyllis Chiasson - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (2):207–226.
    Although we all learn differently, we all need to be able to engage certain fundamental reasoning skills if we are to manoeuvre successfully through life—however we define success. Peirce's philosophy provides us with a framework for helping students develop and hone the ability for making deliberate and well‐considered choices. For, embedded within Peirce's complete body of work is a design for thinking that provides a sturdy foundation for the development of three important learning capabilities. These capabilities are 1) the ability (...)
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  16.  14
    Peirce on Education: Nurturing the First Rule of Reason.Torill Strand - 2005 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 24 (3-4):309-316.
  17.  32
    Rebuilding Babylon: The Pluralism of Lydia Maria Child.Scott L. Pratt - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (2):92-104.
    : One of the most influential branches of nineteenth-century American feminism was a resistance movement committed to the idea that the key to social reform was the recognition and maintenance of human differences. This approach, which became central to American pragmatism, had its roots in a tradition of American women writers including Lydia Maria Child. This paper examines Child's work and focuses on her conception of pluralism and its role in sustaining diverse communities.
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  18.  5
    Rebuilding Babylon: The Pluralism of Lydia Maria Child.Scott L. Pratt - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (2):92-104.
    One of the most influential branches of nineteenth-century American feminism was a resistance movement committed to the idea that the key to social reform was the recognition and maintenance of human differences. This approach, which became central to American pragmatism, had its roots in a tradition of American women writers including Lydia Maria Child. This paper examines Child's work and focuses on her conception of pluralism and its role in sustaining diverse communities.
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  19.  28
    This is Simply What I Do.Catherine Legg - 2003 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (1):58–80.
    Wittgenstein's discussion of rule-following is widely regarded to have identified what Kripke called "the most radical and original sceptical problem that philosophy has seen to date". But does it? This paper examines the problem in the light of Charles Peirce's distinctive "scientific hierarchy". Peirce identifies a phenomenological inquiry which is prior to both logic and metaphysics, whose role is to identify the most fundamental philosophical categories. His third category, particularly salient in this context, pertains to general predication. Rule-following scepticism, the (...)
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  20.  51
    Hegel and Peircean Abduction.Paul Redding - 2003 - European Journal of Philosophy 11 (3):295–313.
  21.  47
    Pursuing Peirce.Joseph Brent - 1996 - Synthese 106 (3):301 - 322.
    Charles S. Peirce, polymath, philosopher, logician, lived a life of often wild extremes and, when he died in 1914, had earned a vile reputation as a debauched genius. Yet he created a unified, profound and brilliant work, both published and unpublished, a fact difficult to explain. In my 1993 biography, I proposed three hypotheses to account for his Jekyll-Hyde character: his obsession with the puzzle of meaning, two neurological pathologies, trigeminal neuralgia and left-handedness, and the powerful influence of his father. (...)
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  22.  23
    Review Essay.T. L. Short - 1996 - Synthese 106 (3):409-430.
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  23.  27
    Biological Realism and Social Constructivism.John Sabini & Jay Schulkin - 1994 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 24 (3):207–217.
    In this paper we attempt to reconcile two important, current intellectual traditions: Darwinism and social constructionism. We believe that these two schools have important points of contact that have been obscured because each school has feared that the other wanted to put it out of business. We try to show that both traditions have much to of offer psychology, a discipline that has often been too individualistic, too concerned with the private and the subjective. The spirit of American pragmatism can (...)
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  24.  29
    Mimicking Foundationalism: On Sentiment and Self‐Control.Christopher Hookway - 1993 - European Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):156-174.