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Beyond: The Philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas

Northwestern University Press (1997)

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  1. Otherwise Than Hospitality: A Disputation on the Relation of Ethics to Law and Politics.Gilbert Leung & Matthew Stone - 2009 - Law and Critique 20 (2):193-206.
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  • Corporate Legal Responsibility: A Levinasian Perspective.Conceição Soares - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (3):545-553.
    In this article I will look into Corporate Legal Responsibility taking into account Levinas’s notion of infinite responsibility, as well as his understanding of ethical language. My account of Levinas’s philosophy will show that it challenges – breaking down – deeply entrenched distinctions in the dominant strands of moral philosophy, within which the theory of individual responsibility is embedded, such as between:(1) duty to others on the one hand and supererogation on the other; (2) perfect duty to others on the (...)
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  • The Impossibility of Corporate Ethics: For a Levinasian Approach to Managerial Ethics.David Bevan & Hervé Corvellec - 2007 - Business Ethics 16 (3):208–219.
    The moral philosophy of Levinas offers a stark prospectus of impossibility for corporate ethics. It differs from most traditional ethical theories in that, for Levinas, the ethical develops in a personal meeting of one with the Other, rather than residing in some internal deliberation of the moral subject. Levinasian ethics emphasizes an infinite personal responsibility arising for each of us in the face of the Other and in the presence of the Third. It stresses the imperious demand we experience to (...)
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  • El existir neutro como “fenómeno saturado”: describiendo la contra-experiencia del exceso con Emmanuel Levinas y Jean-Luc Marion.Jaime Llorente Cardo - 2015 - Tópicos: Revista de Filosofía 49:123-162.
    El propósito del presente estudio es mostrar que el il y a o existir neutro que constituye uno de los temas recurrentes abordados por Levinas en sus primeras obras de finales de los años cuarenta, pertenece plenamente a la categoría descrita por la fenomenología del don de Jean-Luc Marion bajo la denominación de “fenómeno saturado” o “paradoja”. En orden a poner de relieve tal pertenencia, se examinan las cuatro figuras o atributos que definen el exceso de donación intuitiva propio de (...)
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  • Editorial Introduction.Campbell Jones - 2007 - Business Ethics 16 (3):196-202.
    This special issue presents the results of a three‐day conference that was held between 27 and 29 October 2005 at the Centre for Philosophy and Political Economy at the University of Leicester. The papers in this issue approach the work of Emmanuel Levinas and respond to him in different ways. Some introduce his work, some apply it in various contexts, some propose to extend it, while others question it. The issue also includes, in English for the first time, a translation (...)
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  • Levinas and an Ethics for Science Education.David W. Blades - 2006 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (5):647–664.
    Despite claims that STS science education promotes ethical responsibility, this approach is not supported by a clear philosophy of ethics. This paper argues that the work of Emmanuel Levinas provides an ethics suitable for an STS science education. His concept of the face of the Other redefines education as learning from the other, rather than about the other. Extrapolating the face of the Other to the non‐human world suggests an ethics for science education where the goal of pedagogy is peace (...)
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  • Transparency and Opacity: Levinasian Reflections on Accountability in Australian Schooling.Sam Sellar - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (2):1-15.
    This article draws on the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas to consider, from an ethical perspective, the current transparency and accountability agenda in Australian schooling. It focuses on the case of the My School website and the argument that transparent publication of comparative performance data via the website provides a basis for making things better in schooling. The article argues that while technologies of accountability may have potential benefits, they cannot provide a basis for this ethical project. Instead, the ethical experience (...)
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  • Repentance and Forgiveness: The Undoing of Time.Edith Wyschogrod - 2007 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1-3):157-168.
    Mass death resulting from war, starvation, and disease as well as the vicissitudes of extreme poverty and enforced sexual servitude are recognizably pandemic ills of the contemporary world. In light of their magnitude, are repentance, regret for the harms inflicted upon others or oneself, and forgiveness, proferring the erasure of the guilt of those who have inflicted these harms, rendered nugatory? Jacques Derrida claims that forgiveness is intrinsically rather than circumstantially or historically impossible. Forgiveness, trapped in a paradox, is possible (...)
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  • The Created Ego in Levinas' Totality and Infinity.April D. Capili - 2011 - Sophia 50 (4):677-692.
    There are two seemingly opposed descriptions of the subject in Totality and Infinity : the separate and autonomous I and the self that is ready to respond to the Other’s suffering and need. This paper points out that there is in fact another way Levinas speaks of the subject, which reinforces and reconciles the other two accounts. Throughout his first major work, Levinas explains how the ego is allowed to emerge as such by the Other who constantly confronts it. At (...)
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  • The Political Significance of the Face: Deleuze's Critique of Levinas.Gavin Rae - 2016 - Critical Horizons 17 (3-4):279-303.
    While Levinas famously claims that ethics precedes ontology and emanates from the concrete experience of the other's face, it is often forgotten that Deleuze also discusses the face in numerous writings. The purpose of this paper is to briefly outline Levinas's arguments regarding the constitution of the face to chart its ethical importance, before engaging with Deleuze's critique of Levinas's position. I show that, by distinguishing between two systems of signification – the head-body system and the face system – Deleuze (...)
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  • Prospects for A Levinasian Epistemic Infinitism.J. Aaron Simmons & Scott F. Aikin - 2012 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 20 (3):437-460.
    Abstract Epistemic infinitism is certainly not a majority view in contemporary epistemology. While there are some examples of infinitism in the history of philosophy, more work needs to be done mining this history in order to provide a richer understanding of how infinitism might be formulated internal to different philosophical frameworks. Accordingly, we argue that the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas can be read as operating according to an ?impure? model of epistemic infinitism. The infinite obligation inaugurated by the ?face to (...)
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  • Care, Domination, and Representation.Rochelle Green, Bonnie Mann & Amy Story - 2006 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 21 (2-3):177-195.
    Some photographs, more than mere representations, are ethical commands, calling us to respond to human suffering. Photos of Abu Graib, like iconic photos of Vietnam, called us to a posture of care, and confronted us with ourselves, with our national domination, and with how we represent ourselves to the world. This article, drawing on Kittay (1999), Butler (2004), and Levinas (1961, 1974, 1985), attempts to untangle the relation among care, domination, and representation. Implications for philosophers and journalists are suggested.
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  • Levinas, Justice and Health Care.P. Nortvedt - 2003 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (1):25-34.
    In this paper I argue that the metaphysical ethics of Emmanuel Levinas captures some essential moral intuitions that are central to health care. However, there is an ongoing discussion about the relevance of ethical metaphysics for normative ethics and in particular on the question of the relationship between justice and individualized care. In this paper I take part in this debate and I argue that Levinas' idea of an ethics of the Other that guides politics and justice can shed important (...)
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  • Aesthetics of Surrender: Levinas and the Disruption of Agency in Moral Education.Ann Chinnery - 2003 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 22 (1):5-17.
    Education has long been charged with the taskof forming and shaping subjectivity andidentity. However, the prevailing view ofeducation as a project of producing rationalautonomous subjects has been challenged bypostmodern and poststructuralist critiques ofsubstantial subjectivity. In a similar vein,Emmanuel Levinas inverts the traditionalconception of subjectivity, claiming that weare constituted as subjects only in respondingto the other. In other words, subjectivity isderivative of an existentially priorresponsibility to and for the other. Hisconception of ethical responsibility is thusalso a radical departure from the prevailingview (...)
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  • A Religious Education Otherwise? An Examination and Proposed Interruption of Current British Practice.Anna Strhan - 2010 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 44 (1):23-44.
    This paper examines the recent shift towards the dominance of the study of philosophy of religion, ethics and critical thinking within religious education in Britain. It explores the impact of the critical realist model, advocated by Andrew Wright and Philip Barnes, in response to prior models of phenomenological religious education, in order to expose the ways in which both approaches can lead to a distorted understanding of the nature of religion. Although the writing of Emmanuel Levinas has been used in (...)
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  • Repentance and Forgiveness: The Undoing of Time. [REVIEW]Edith Wyschogrod - 2006 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1/3):157 - 168.
    Mass death resulting from war, starvation, and disease as well as the vicissitudes of extreme poverty and enforced sexual servitude are recognizably pandemic ills of the contemporary world. In light of their magnitude, are repentance, regret for the harms inflicted upon others or oneself, and forgiveness, proferring the erasure of the guilt of those who have inflicted these harms, rendered nugatory? Jacques Derrida claims that forgiveness is intrinsically rather than circumstantially or historically impossible. Forgiveness, trapped in a paradox, is possible (...)
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  • Levinas and the Philosophy of Religion.Stephen Minister & Jackson Murtha - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (11):1023-1033.
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  • Why is Ethics First Philosophy? Levinas in Phenomenological Context.Steven Crowell - 2012 - European Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):564-588.
    This paper explores, from a phenomenological perspective, the conditions necessary for the possession of intentional content, i.e., for being intentionally directed toward the world. It argues that Levinas's concept of ethics as first philosophy makes an important contribution to this task. Intentional directedness, as understood here, is normatively structured. Levinas's ‘ethics’ can be understood as a phenomenological account of how our experience of the other subject as another subject takes place in the recognition of the normative force of a command. (...)
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  • Body as Subjectivity to Ethical Signification of the Body: Revisiting Levinas’s Early Conception of the Subject.Jojo Joseph Varakukalayil - 2015 - Sophia 54 (3):281-295.
    In Levinas’s early works, the ‘body as subjectivity’ is the focus of research bearing significant implications for his later philosophy of the body. How this is achieved becomes the thrust of this article. We analyze how the existent, through hypostasis, emerges hic et nunc, and explores further its effort to exist is effected in its relation to existence. In delineating this, we argue that the existent does not emerge from the il y a as an idealistic subject, but rather is (...)
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  • Fundraising Discourse and the Commodification of the Other.Per-Anders Forstorp - 2007 - Business Ethics 16 (3):286–301.
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  • Editorial Introduction.Campbell Jones - 2007 - Business Ethics 16 (3):196–202.
    This special issue contains papers first presented at a conference that was held 14–16 May 2008 at the Centre for Philosophy and Political Economy at the University of Leicester. Each of the papers takes up ideas from the works of Jacques Derrida and seeks to apply these to questions of business, ethics and business ethics. The papers take up quite different parts of Derrida's works, from his work on the animal, narrative and story, the violence of codification and the limits (...)
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  • Proximity and Rationalisation: The Limits of a Levinasian Ethics in the Context of Corporate Governance and Regulation.Samuel Mansell - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (3):565-577.
    In this article, I explore how the ideas of French philosopher Emmanuel Levinas offer insights into a debate often held today in the field of corporate governance, concerning the relative merits of statutory and voluntary approaches to the regulation of business. The philosophical position outlined by Levinas questions whether any rule-based systematisation of ethical responsibility, either statutory or voluntary, can ever equate to a genuine responsibility for the other person. I reflect on how various authors have adapted Levinas’s philosophy to (...)
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  • The Quasi-Face of the Cell Phone: Rethinking Alterity and Screens.Galit Wellner - 2014 - Human Studies 37 (3):299-316.
    Why does a cell phone have a screen? From televisions and cell phones to refrigerators, many contemporary technologies come with a screen. The article aims at answering this question by employing Emmanuel Levinas’ notions of the Other and the face. This article also engages with Don Ihde’s conceptualization of alterity relations, in which the technological acts as quasi-other with which we maintain relations. If technology is a quasi-other, then, I claim, the screen is the quasi-face. By exploring Levinas’ ontology, specifically (...)
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  • Primordial Moral Awareness: Levinas, Conscience, and the Unavoidable Call to Responsibility.Daniel J. Fleming - 2015 - Heythrop Journal 56 (4):604-618.
    The phenomenon of conscience as articulated in Roman Catholic moral theology has at least three dimensions: a fundamental and universal call to moral goodness; the search for moral truth; and a commitment to act in a particular way. Recent moral theology has tended to focus on the latter two dimensions, but there has been a strong call from Thomas Ryan for attention to the first dimension of conscience, especially its constitution in ‘horizontal relationality’. In this article I respond to Ryan's (...)
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  • The Fact of Reason and the Face of the Other: Autonomy, Constraint, and Rational Agency in Kant and Levinas.Darin Crawford Gates - 2002 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 40 (4):493-522.
  • Fundraising Discourse and the Commodification of the Other.Per-Anders Forstorp - 2007 - Business Ethics: A European Review 16 (3):286-301.
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