Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. What Mechanisms Underlie Implicit Statistical Learning? Transitional Probabilities Versus Chunks in Language Learning.Pierre Perruchet - 2019 - Topics in Cognitive Science 11 (3):520-535.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Under What Conditions Can Recursion Be Learned? Effects of Starting Small in Artificial Grammar Learning of Center‐Embedded Structure.Fenna H. Poletiek, Christopher M. Conway, Michelle R. Ellefson, Jun Lai, Bruno R. Bocanegra & Morten H. Christiansen - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (8):2855-2889.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Acquiring Complex Communicative Systems: Statistical Learning of Language and Emotion.Ashley L. Ruba, Seth D. Pollak & Jenny R. Saffran - 2022 - Topics in Cognitive Science 14 (3):432-450.
    Topics in Cognitive Science, Volume 14, Issue 3, Page 432-450, July 2022.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Many Important Language Universals Are Not Reducible to Processing or Cognition.David P. Medeiros, Massimo Piattelli-Palmarini & Thomas G. Bever - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
    Christiansen & Chater ignore the many linguistic universals that cannot be reduced to processing or cognitive constraints, some of which we present. Their claim that grammar is merely acquired language processing skill cannot account for such universals. Their claim that all other universal properties are historically and culturally based is a nonsequitur about language evolution, lacking data.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Quasiregularity and Its Discontents: The Legacy of the Past Tense Debate.Mark S. Seidenberg & David C. Plaut - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (6):1190-1228.
    Rumelhart and McClelland's chapter about learning the past tense created a degree of controversy extraordinary even in the adversarial culture of modern science. It also stimulated a vast amount of research that advanced the understanding of the past tense, inflectional morphology in English and other languages, the nature of linguistic representations, relations between language and other phenomena such as reading and object recognition, the properties of artificial neural networks, and other topics. We examine the impact of the Rumelhart and McClelland (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • A Perceptual Account of Symbolic Reasoning.David Landy, Colin Allen & Carlos Zednik - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    People can be taught to manipulate symbols according to formal mathematical and logical rules. Cognitive scientists have traditionally viewed this capacity—the capacity for symbolic reasoning—as grounded in the ability to internally represent numbers, logical relationships, and mathematical rules in an abstract, amodal fashion. We present an alternative view, portraying symbolic reasoning as a special kind of embodied reasoning in which arithmetic and logical formulae, externally represented as notations, serve as targets for powerful perceptual and sensorimotor systems. Although symbolic reasoning often (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • The Structure of Semantic Competence: Compositionality as an Innate Constraint of The Faculty of Language.Guillermo Del Pinal - 2015 - Mind and Language 30 (4):375–413.
    This paper defends the view that the Faculty of Language is compositional, i.e., that it computes the meaning of complex expressions from the meanings of their immediate constituents and their structure. I fargue that compositionality and other competing constraints on the way in which the Faculty of Language computes the meanings of complex expressions should be understood as hypotheses about innate constraints of the Faculty of Language. I then argue that, unlike compositionality, most of the currently available non-compositional constraints predict (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Five Ways in Which Computational Modeling Can Help Advance Cognitive Science: Lessons From Artificial Grammar Learning.Willem Zuidema, Robert M. French, Raquel G. Alhama, Kevin Ellis, Timothy J. O'Donnell, Tim Sainburg & Timothy Q. Gentner - 2020 - Topics in Cognitive Science 12 (3):925-941.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Utility of Cognitive Plausibility in Language Acquisition Modeling: Evidence From Word Segmentation.Lawrence Phillips & Lisa Pearl - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (8):1824-1854.
    The informativity of a computational model of language acquisition is directly related to how closely it approximates the actual acquisition task, sometimes referred to as the model's cognitive plausibility. We suggest that though every computational model necessarily idealizes the modeled task, an informative language acquisition model can aim to be cognitively plausible in multiple ways. We discuss these cognitive plausibility checkpoints generally and then apply them to a case study in word segmentation, investigating a promising Bayesian segmentation strategy. We incorporate (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Poverty of the Stimulus Revisited.Robert C. Berwick, Paul Pietroski, Beracah Yankama & Noam Chomsky - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (7):1207-1242.
    A central goal of modern generative grammar has been to discover invariant properties of human languages that reflect “the innate schematism of mind that is applied to the data of experience” and that “might reasonably be attributed to the organism itself as its contribution to the task of the acquisition of knowledge” (Chomsky, 1971). Candidates for such invariances include the structure dependence of grammatical rules, and in particular, certain constraints on question formation. Various “poverty of stimulus” (POS) arguments suggest that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • Quantitative Standards for Absolute Linguistic Universals.Steven T. Piantadosi & Edward Gibson - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (4):736-756.
    Absolute linguistic universals are often justified by cross-linguistic analysis: If all observed languages exhibit a property, the property is taken to be a likely universal, perhaps specified in the cognitive or linguistic systems of language learners and users. In many cases, these patterns are then taken to motivate linguistic theory. Here, we show that cross-linguistic analysis will very rarely be able to statistically justify absolute, inviolable patterns in language. We formalize two statistical methods—frequentist and Bayesian—and show that in both it (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Power of Ignoring: Filtering Input for Argument Structure Acquisition.Laurel Perkins, Naomi H. Feldman & Jeffrey Lidz - 2022 - Cognitive Science 46 (1):e13080.
    Cognitive Science, Volume 46, Issue 1, January 2022.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Fractal Analysis Illuminates the Form of Connectionist Structural Gradualness.Whitney Tabor, Pyeong Whan Cho & Emily Szkudlarek - 2013 - Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (3):634-667.
    We examine two connectionist networks—a fractal learning neural network (FLNN) and a Simple Recurrent Network (SRN)—that are trained to process center-embedded symbol sequences. Previous work provides evidence that connectionist networks trained on infinite-state languages tend to form fractal encodings. Most such work focuses on simple counting recursion cases (e.g., anbn), which are not comparable to the complex recursive patterns seen in natural language syntax. Here, we consider exponential state growth cases (including mirror recursion), describe a new training scheme that seems (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Adding Sentence Types to a Model of Syntactic Category Acquisition.Stella Frank, Sharon Goldwater & Frank Keller - 2013 - Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (3):495-521.
    The acquisition of syntactic categories is a crucial step in the process of acquiring syntax. At this stage, before a full grammar is available, only surface cues are available to the learner. Previous computational models have demonstrated that local contexts are informative for syntactic categorization. However, local contexts are affected by sentence-level structure. In this paper, we add sentence type as an observed feature to a model of syntactic category acquisition, based on experimental evidence showing that pre-syntactic children are able (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • How Do Children Restrict Their Linguistic Generalizations? An (Un‐)Grammaticality Judgment Study.Ben Ambridge - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (3):508-543.
    A paradox at the heart of language acquisition research is that, to achieve adult-like competence, children must acquire the ability to generalize verbs into non-attested structures, while avoiding utterances that are deemed ungrammatical by native speakers. For example, children must learn that, to denote the reversal of an action, un- can be added to many verbs, but not all (e.g., roll/unroll; close/*unclose). This study compared theoretical accounts of how this is done. Children aged 5–6 (N = 18), 9–10 (N = (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Don't Trust Fodor's Guide in Monte Carlo: Learning Concepts by Hypothesis Testing Without Circularity.Michael Deigan - forthcoming - Mind and Language.
    Fodor argued that learning a concept by hypothesis testing would involve an impossible circularity. I show that Fodor's argument implicitly relies on the assumption that actually φ-ing entails an ability to φ. But this assumption is false in cases of φ-ing by luck, and just such luck is involved in testing hypotheses with the kinds of generative random sampling methods that many cognitive scientists take our minds to use. Concepts thus can be learned by hypothesis testing without circularity, and it (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Interpreting Silent Gesture: Cognitive Biases and Rational Inference in Emerging Language Systems.Marieke Schouwstra, Henriëtte Swart & Bill Thompson - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (7).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • What Complexity Differences Reveal About Domains in Language.Jeffrey Heinz & William Idsardi - 2013 - Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (1):111-131.
    An important distinction between phonology and syntax has been overlooked. All phonological patterns belong to the regular region of the Chomsky Hierarchy, but not all syntactic patterns do. We argue that the hypothesis that humans employ distinct learning mechanisms for phonology and syntax currently offers the best explanation for this difference.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Skepticism and the Acquisition of “Knowledge”.Shaun Nichols & N. Ángel Pinillos - 2018 - Mind and Language 33 (4):397-414.
    Do you know you are not being massively deceived by an evil demon? That is a familiar skeptical challenge. Less familiar is this question: How do you have a conception of knowledge on which the evil demon constitutes a prima facie challenge? Recently several philosophers have suggested that our responses to skeptical scenarios can be explained in terms of heuristics and biases. We offer an alternative explanation, based in learning theory. We argue that, given the evidence available to the learner, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Rational Learners and Moral Rules.Shaun Nichols, Shikhar Kumar, Theresa Lopez, Alisabeth Ayars & Hoi-Yee Chan - 2016 - Mind and Language 31 (5):530-554.
    People draw subtle distinctions in the normative domain. But it remains unclear exactly what gives rise to such distinctions. On one prominent approach, emotion systems trigger non-utilitarian judgments. The main alternative, inspired by Chomskyan linguistics, suggests that moral distinctions derive from an innate moral grammar. In this article, we draw on Bayesian learning theory to develop a rational learning account. We argue that the ‘size principle’, which is implicated in word learning, can also explain how children would use scant and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • When Absence of Evidence Is Evidence of Absence: Rational Inferences From Absent Data.Anne S. Hsu, Andy Horng, Thomas L. Griffiths & Nick Chater - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S5):1155-1167.
    Identifying patterns in the world requires noticing not only unusual occurrences, but also unusual absences. We examined how people learn from absences, manipulating the extent to which an absence is expected. People can make two types of inferences from the absence of an event: either the event is possible but has not yet occurred, or the event never occurs. A rational analysis using Bayesian inference predicts that inferences from absent data should depend on how much the absence is expected to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Learning How to Generalize.Joseph L. Austerweil, Sophia Sanborn & Thomas L. Griffiths - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (8):e12777.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Bayesian Models of Cognition: What's Built in After All?Amy Perfors - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (2):127-138.
    This article explores some of the philosophical implications of the Bayesian modeling paradigm. In particular, it focuses on the ramifications of the fact that Bayesian models pre‐specify an inbuilt hypothesis space. To what extent does this pre‐specification correspond to simply ‘‘building the solution in''? I argue that any learner must have a built‐in hypothesis space in precisely the same sense that Bayesian models have one. This has implications for the nature of learning, Fodor's puzzle of concept acquisition, and the role (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Subtle Implicit Language Facts Emerge From the Functions of Constructions.Adele E. Goldberg - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • A Tutorial Introduction to Bayesian Models of Cognitive Development.Amy Perfors, Joshua B. Tenenbaum, Thomas L. Griffiths & Fei Xu - 2011 - Cognition 120 (3):302-321.
  • Bayesian Cognitive Science, Unification, and Explanation.Stephan Hartmann & Matteo Colombo - 2017 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 68 (2).
    It is often claimed that the greatest value of the Bayesian framework in cognitive science consists in its unifying power. Several Bayesian cognitive scientists assume that unification is obviously linked to explanatory power. But this link is not obvious, as unification in science is a heterogeneous notion, which may have little to do with explanation. While a crucial feature of most adequate explanations in cognitive science is that they reveal aspects of the causal mechanism that produces the phenomenon to be (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  • Discovery of a Recursive Principle: An Artificial Grammar Investigation of Human Learning of a Counting Recursion Language.Pyeong Whan Cho, Emily Szkudlarek & Whitney Tabor - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Bayesian Boom: Good Thing or Bad?Ulrike Hahn - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
  • A World Unto Itself: Human Communication as Active Inference.Jared Vasil, Paul B. Badcock, Axel Constant, Karl Friston & Maxwell J. D. Ramstead - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
  • Modeling Statistical Insensitivity: Sources of Suboptimal Behavior.Annie Gagliardi, Naomi H. Feldman & Jeffrey Lidz - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (1):188-217.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Empiricism, Syntax, and Ontogeny.Gabe Dupre - 2021 - Philosophical Psychology 34 (7):1011-1046.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Neural Plasticity and Concepts Ontogeny.Alessio Plebe & Marco Mazzone - 2016 - Synthese 193 (12):3889-3929.
    Neural plasticity has been invoked as a powerful argument against nativism. However, there is a line of argument, which is well exemplified by Pinker and more recently by Laurence and Margolis The conceptual mind: new directions in the study of concepts, MIT, Cambridge, 2015) with respect to concept nativism, according to which even extreme cases of plasticity show important innate constraints, so that one should rather speak of “constrained plasticity”. According to this view, cortical areas are not really equipotential, they (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Novel Methodology to Examine Cognitive and Experiential Factors in Language Development: Combining Eye-Tracking and LENA Technology.Rosalie Odean, Alina Nazareth & Shannon M. Pruden - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Bayesian Learning and the Psychology of Rule Induction.Ansgar D. Endress - 2013 - Cognition 127 (2):159-176.
  • How Children Perceive Fractals: Hierarchical Self-Similarity and Cognitive Development.Maurício Dias Martins, Sabine Laaha, Eva Maria Freiberger, Soonja Choi & W. Tecumseh Fitch - 2014 - Cognition 133 (1):10-24.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Compression and Communication in the Cultural Evolution of Linguistic Structure.Simon Kirby, Monica Tamariz, Hannah Cornish & Kenny Smith - 2015 - Cognition 141:87-102.
  • Meaningful Questions: The Acquisition of Auxiliary Inversion in a Connectionist Model of Sentence Production.Hartmut Fitz & Franklin Chang - 2017 - Cognition 166:225-250.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Harmonic Biases in Child Learners: In Support of Language Universals.Jennifer Culbertson & Elissa L. Newport - 2015 - Cognition 139:71-82.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • Bootstrapping Language Acquisition.Omri Abend, Tom Kwiatkowski, Nathaniel J. Smith, Sharon Goldwater & Mark Steedman - 2017 - Cognition 164:116-143.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Input Complexity Affects Long-Term Retention of Statistically Learned Regularities in an Artificial Language Learning Task.Ethan Jost, Katherine Brill-Schuetz, Kara Morgan-Short & Morten H. Christiansen - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 13.
  • Cultural Transmission in Cycles: The Production and Maintenance of Cumulative Culture.Thomas Abel - 2015 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 15 (5):443-492.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Imaginary Fundamentalists: The Unshocking Truth About Bayesian Cognitive Science.Nick Chater, Noah Goodman, Thomas L. Griffiths, Charles Kemp, Mike Oaksford & Joshua B. Tenenbaum - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (4):194-196.
    If Bayesian Fundamentalism existed, Jones & Love's (J&L's) arguments would provide a necessary corrective. But it does not. Bayesian cognitive science is deeply concerned with characterizing algorithms and representations, and, ultimately, implementations in neural circuits; it pays close attention to environmental structure and the constraints of behavioral data, when available; and it rigorously compares multiple models, both within and across papers. J&L's recommendation of Bayesian Enlightenment corresponds to past, present, and, we hope, future practice in Bayesian cognitive science.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Structures, Not Strings: Linguistics as Part of the Cognitive Sciences.Martin B. H. Everaert, Marinus A. C. Huybregts, Noam Chomsky, Robert C. Berwick & Johan J. Bolhuis - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (12):729-743.